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Summary

  1. Theresa May to publish her new Brexit plan to Parliament on 21 January
  2. Full debate and key vote on that plan on 29 January
  3. PM holding talks with MPs and urges people to "work constructively together"
  4. Jeremy Corbyn refuses to take part unless the PM rules out a no-deal Brexit
  5. Mrs May has held meetings with the Lib Dems, SNP and Plaid Cymru
  6. Government paper suggests new EU referendum would take "in excess of a year"

Live Reporting

By Paul Gribben, Dulcie Lee and Becky Morton

All times stated are UK

  1. DUP in Westminster for talks

    DUP deputy leader Nigel Dodds and DUP Leader Arlene Foster in Whitehall, London, after the Prime Minister announced that she would invite party leaders in the Commons and other MPs in for discussions to get a Parliamentary consensus on the way forward over Brexit.
    Image caption: DUP deputy leader Nigel Dodds and leader Arlene Foster in Westminster for talks on Thursday

    The top two from the Democratic Unionist Party - which supported the government in the no-confidence vote despite opposing the PM's Brexit deal - are meeting Theresa May in Whitehall.

    Mrs May is continuing cross-party talks about how to move forward with Brexit.

    Tory MP and ex-Northern Irish Secretary Theresa Villiers is also in Westminster.

    Conservative Theresa Villiers - who voted down Mrs May's Brexit deal but in support of her government
    Image caption: Conservative Theresa Villiers - who voted down Mrs May's Brexit deal but in support of her government
  2. A-level politics students on Brexit: 'A circus freak show'

    BBC News Channel

    Video content

    Video caption: Brexit: A-level students share views

    A-level politics students from Birchwood High School in Bishop's Stortford had their mock exam rescheduled so they could appear on the BBC News Channel to discuss Brexit.

    One of the students - who are aged 17 and 18 - said: "I just view it as a circus freak show... A second referendum would just extend the whole debate even longer."

  3. MPs to discuss new Brexit motion on 29 January

    Andrea Leadsom

    Andrea Leadsom says she can confirm a "statement and a motion" on the government's next steps on Brexit will be tabled on Monday of next week.

    She says a full day of debate on the motion will then take place on Tuesday, 29 January, subject to the agreement of the House.

  4. Sinn Féin: Tories 'actively hostile' to Ireland

    Mary Lou McDonald

    Sinn Féin leader Mary Lou McDonald has accused the UK government of a "blatant disregard" for Irish interests and upholding of the Good Friday Agreement.

    Mrs McDonald dismissed a claim by former Brexit secretary David Davis that the government had "a blind spot" when it came to Brexit and Ireland - saying instead it was a case "of active hostility".

    "The hostility has been absolutely manifest for some time now," Mrs McDonald told BBC Radio Ulster's Good Morning Ulster programme.

    "I would regard the Boris Johnson, Jacob Rees-Mogg view of the world to be utterly, not blind to Irish interests, but actively hostile to them."

  5. EU Parliament's chief Brexit negotiator tweets

    Guy Verhofstadt shares an article from Belgian government minister Maggie De Block, who has promised to safeguard the rights of UK citizens in Belgium in the event of a no-deal Brexit - if the British government promises to do the same for Belgian ex-pats.

    The European Commission, in its contingency plan for a no-deal Brexit, has already urged the 27 EU countries to "take a generous approach to the rights of UK citizens in the EU, provided that this approach is reciprocated by the UK".

    View more on twitter
  6. Lucas: May refused to rule out no-deal

    Caroline Lucas, in Whitehall, London, after the Prime Minister announced that she would invite party leaders in the Commons and other MPs in for discussions to get a Parliamentary consensus on the way forward over Brexit.
    Image caption: Ms Lucas met the PM, after Mrs May invited other MPs for talks on the next steps for Brexit

    Green Party MP Caroline Lucas met with Theresa May at the Cabinet Office this morning.

    Ms Lucas said the PM refused to rule out a no-deal Brexit.

    "I repeatedly urged her again and again to take 'no deal' off the table because I think it completely skews the talks because you know that cliff edge is there," she said.

    And Mrs May was resisting the option of extending Article 50, Ms Lucas added.

  7. Barnier: 'Everyone loses' in Brexit

    Michel Barnier (C), European Chief Negotiator for the United Kingdom Exiting the European Union, lanked by the President of the European Affairs Commission Regina Bastos (2-R) attends a hearing at the European Affairs Commission of the Portuguese parliament in Lisbon, Portugal
    Image caption: Michel Barnier in Portugal on Thursday

    The EU's chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier is in Lisbon, Portugal, where he is attending a meeting of the Parliament's European Affairs Commission.

    According to Reuters, he told the officials that Britain and the EU can adopt "contingency measures" in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

    "But that will be very difficult and will not be done in a climate of confidence," he added. "The best guarantee is reaching an agreement."

    He said again that it's up to the UK to decide the next steps, and added: "Brexit is a situation where everyone loses."

  8. Tony Blair on what he would do now if still PM

    The former prime minister was speaking to Radio 4's Today programme about Brexit...

    Video content

    Video caption: The former prime minister says the date for leaving the EU has to be delayed
  9. Hard Brexit a 'disaster' for UK, says JP Morgan boss

    JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon And Detroit Mayor Duggan Discuss The Bank's Investment In Detroit

    JP Morgan chief executive Jamie Dimon has warned against a "hard Brexit" by the UK from the European Union.

    "I think a hard Brexit will be a disaster for Great Britain," Mr Dimon said at an event in New York.

    However, he added: "We don't think it's going to happen, because it's bad for Europe too."

  10. French PM: We're launching Brexit no-deal plan

    France's prime minister Edouard Philippe says the country is launching its Brexit no-deal plan with a series of decrees to be announced over coming weeks.

    He said a no-deal Brexit had “become less and less improbable”.

    The BBC's Paris producer tweets...

    View more on twitter
  11. No-deal Brexit warning for UK drivers

    Simon Read

    Business Reporter

    Cars

    If UK motorists plan to drive abroad after 29 March, they need to act soon or risk breaking the law.

    That's because a no-deal Brexit would leave drivers needing to have proof of insurance known as a Green Card.

    EU regulations will hit businesses and individuals. They will also apply to anyone driving across the Northern Ireland/Irish Republic border.

    You need to order the card a month before you plan to travel, the Association of British Insurers has warned.

    Read more here.

  12. Ministers and senior Tories arrive for more talks

    Ministers and senior Tories have been arriving at Downing Street to continue talks with parliamentarians and MPs from other parties about how to move forward with Brexit.

    British Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Michael Gove arrives at No. 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, 17 January 2019. British Prime Minister Theresa May is holding talks with the cabinet and party leaders over Brexit
    Image caption: Environment Secretary Michael Gove arrives at Downing Street on Thursday morning
    British Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union Stephen Barclay arrives at No. 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, 17 January 2019. British Prime Minister Theresa May is holding talks with the cabinet and party leaders over Brexit.
    Image caption: Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay
    Owen Paterson, Iain Duncan Smith, David Davis, Mark Francois and Steve Baker in Whitehall, London, after the Prime Minister announced that she would invite party leaders in the Commons
    Image caption: Tory colleagues Owen Paterson, Iain Duncan Smith, David Davis, Mark Francois and Steve Baker in Whitehall on Thursday morning
    Sir Graham Brady, Chairman of the 1922 Committee of Tory backbenchers, arrives at the Cabinet Office in Whitehall, London, after the Prime Minister announced that she would invite party leaders in the Commons and other MPs in for discussions to get a Parliamentary consensus on the way forward over Brexit
    Image caption: Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Committee of Tory backbenchers, arrives at the Cabinet Office
    Cheryl Gillan, MP for Chesham and Amersham and a vice-chair of the 1922 Committee arrives
    Image caption: Cheryl Gillan, MP for Chesham and Amersham and a vice-chair of the 1922 Committee
  13. Tories reaching out to Labour

    Labour has, so far, stuck to its plan to refuse talks with the government until Mrs May takes a no-deal Brexit off the table.

    Will that change?

    BBC political correspondent Nick Eardley says Labour's shadow Brexit secretary has been approached for a meeting with his opposite number.

    View more on twitter
  14. Opposition MPs tweet

    Scottish National Party MP Drew Hendry responds to Scottish Secretary David Mundell, who claimed "everything is on the table" for cross-party talks on Brexit.

    View more on twitter

    Labour MP Mike Gapes supports Tony Blair's suggestion that another referendum may be the only way to bring closure to the Brexit debate.

    View more on twitter

    Meanwhile, Labour's Lilian Greenwood says her focus today is not Brexit - but on a Westminster debate about rail investment.

    View more on twitter
  15. Barriers to extending Article 50?

    Tony Connelly - the Europe editor of Irish broadcaster RTE - has suggested Article 50 could only be extended if the House of Commons accepted the Irish backstop proposal - a red line for the majority of Brexiteer MPs.

    Another complication, he says, would be the European Parliament elections coming up in May.

    View more on twitter
  16. Leaving the EU is 'number one', says Brexiteer

    On his way to a meeting with the prime minister this morning, Tory Brexiteer Nigel Evans - who voted against Mrs May's deal - said: "We are leaving the EU. That's number one."

    He added: "The Prime Minister is listening to the 17.4 million people and the red line that's most important is that we are leaving the EU. Some MPs need to accept that.

    "We need to do trade deals throughout the world. We want to do them with the EU, but we should do them with the rest of the world as well."

    Nigel Evans