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Summary

  1. Sunday marks 100 years since the end of World War One, on 11 November 1918
  2. The Queen and senior royals attended London's Cenotaph for the national remembrance service
  3. The Prince of Wales and the prime minister were among those laying wreaths - along with the German president
  4. People's Parade saw 10,000 members of the public file past the Cenotaph
  5. World leaders gathered in Paris, as commemorations took place across the Commonwealth
  6. Services also took place across the UK - and about 1,000 beacons were lit

Live Reporting

By Sophie Morris, Jo Couzens, Alex Kleiderman, Jennifer Scott and Francesca Gillett

All times stated are UK

  1. Sun sets on Armistice Day

    A day of remembrance is drawing to a close, marking 100 years since the end of World War One.

    At 11:00 GMT, people up and down the country fell silent to mark the time World War One officially came to an end.

    Veterans pass the Cenotaph

    Members of the Royal Family and politicians laid wreaths at the Cenotaph in London before thousands of people paraded past the monument to honour all those who have lost their lives in conflict.

    In France, where many of the battles of the Western Front were fought, world leaders gathered in Paris at a ceremony hosted by French President Emmanuel Macron.

    The Queen and Dean of Westminster

    Remembrance services were also held at Llandaff Cathedral in Cardiff, Glasgow Cathedral, St Giles' Cathedral in Edinburgh, and St Anne's Cathedral in Belfast as nations and communities joined together to honour those who lost their lives in conflict.

    And a final service was held with the Queen and members of the Royal Family at Westminster Abbey.

    It ended with more than 1,000 beacons being lit across the UK, symbolising the end of the darkness of war and a return to the lightness of peace.

    Thank you for following our coverage today.

    At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them
  2. Beacons lit across the UK

    More than 1,000 beacons are to be lit across the UK to end commemorations for Armistice Day and to mark 100 years since the end of World War One.

    The beacons will signify the light of peace that emerged from the darkness of four years of war.

    The first beacon was lit at Westminster Abbey in London.

    Beacon outside of Westminster Abbey
    Image caption: Beacon outside of Westminster Abbey
  3. Pride and awe at the People's Procession

    "I want to honour the memory of my grandfather - what he did for our freedom," says Emma Silk, grand-daughter of Harold Victor Silk, who lost his left arm in battle the day before Armistice Day.

    Emma was one of 10,000 people given the chance to take part in the People's Procession - a parade through London's streets on the 11th of the 11th, usually the reserve of the military.

    Exactly 100 years to the day, World War One ended and cheering crowds gathered in Parliament Square and Trafalgar Square where they clambered on to the backs of the stone lions and lit a bonfire at the foot of Nelson's Column.

    Today, the mood of jubilation in victory has been replaced with a quiet pride and an awe at what our ancestors sacrificed and lost for our freedom.

    Read more about the procession from our reporter Marie Jackson.

    Emma Silk, grand-daughter of Harold Victor Silk, who lost his left arm in battle the day before Armistice Day
    Image caption: Emma Silk, grand-daughter of Harold Victor Silk, who lost his left arm in battle the day before Armistice Day
  4. National anthem closes service

    After a blessing from the dean and a rendition of "God Save the Queen" by the congregation, the Royal Family leave the service and it comes to a close.

    Royal Family
  5. German president and Prince Charles read from St John

    The President of Germany, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, reads from St John - but speaks the passage in German.

    Frank-Walter Steinmeier

    He is followed by the Prince of Wales, who also reads from St John, in English.

    Prince Charles
  6. 'The reward of victory is responsibility'

    Actor Simon Russell Beale - who played Winston Churchill in a TV documentary called Dunkirk - reads an extract from Churchill's The Unfinished Task.

    He reads: "The penalty of defeat is ruin. The reward of victory is responsibility. It is an awful recompense.

    "The nations who have drawn the sword in the cause of right and justice, who have persevered together through all the vicissitudes of this fearful journey, whom no danger could appall nor hardship weary, have now become responsible under providence for the immediate future of the world.

    "They can no more divest themselves of this responsibility than they could in the first instance have stood out of the war."

    Actor Simon Russell Beale
    Image caption: Actor Simon Russell Beale
  7. Putting names and faces to the human cost of the war

    At the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh the names of 134,712 men and women who died serving Scotland during World War One are being projected on to the building.

    They include servicemen, munitions workers and nurses.

    Presiding officer Ken Macintosh said: "The fact it will take seven hours to project the names of all those who died reflects the sheer scale of the loss and devastation the war had on communities right across Scotland."

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  8. Archbishop of Canterbury speaks of horror of war

    The Archbishop of Canterbury is the next to address the service.

    The Most Rev Justin Welby says: "The battlefields of the world on 11 November 1918 were images of destruction and despair.

    "Millions had sacrificed their lives. Many more millions bore the psychological and physical scars.

    "Empires had been destroyed. The old order of things had ceased to be."

    He says the call for it to be the war to end all wars was soon broken by "tyranny and ancient hatred that had not been reconciled" in the form of World War Two.

    But, he continues: "The final verdict on evil is defeat.

    "The final call from human beings from the God we worship here today is hope, life and liberation.

    "We look forward in a very different world and society, however great the challenges."

    The Most Rev Justin Welby
    Image caption: The Most Rev Justin Welby
  9. PM reads Bible passage

    Theresa May is the next to give a reading to the congregation - Isaiah 58: 6-12.

    The PM says: "Is not this the fast that I have chosen? To loose the bands of wickedness, to undo the heavy burdens, and to let the oppressed go free, and that ye break every yoke?

    "Is it not to deal thy bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the poor that are cast out to thy house? When thou seest the naked, that thou cover him; and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh?

    "Then shall thy light break forth as the morning, and thine health shall spring forth speedily: and thy righteousness shall go before thee; the glory of the Lord shall be thy reward."

    Theresa May reading at the Westminster Abbey service
    Image caption: Theresa May reading at the Westminster Abbey service
  10. Message of friendship from Dean of Westminister

    Dean of Westminster Dr John Hall prays for a time when conflict is "transformed into friendship and collaboration".

    Speaking to the congregation at Westminster Abbey, he says: "As we mark today the centenary of the Armistice that brought to an end the First World War, we remember with sorrow the sacrifice of lives on all sides of the conflict and the suffering of the devastated and bereaved.

    "We reflect on how people were led into the war and how the war came to an end and on the uneasy peace that followed with its continuing suffering and the disruption of families and ways of life.

    "Above all, in our remembrance and reflection, we hope for a time when aggression between peoples and nations is transformed into friendship and collaboration, when all may live side by side in mutual encouragement and harmony and the weapons of war are transformed into the instruments of peace."

  11. 'We were slow to believe it could really be true'

    Actor John Simm reads an entry from a diary by Private (later Corporal) John Jackson.

    "The news must have been welcome at home and in most countries of world," he reads.

    "But no non-combatants could have any idea what the message meant to the men in the trenches.

    "I think we were slow to believe it could really be true after the long years of fighting."

    John Simm in Westminster Abbey
    Image caption: John Simm in Westminster Abbey
  12. Queen lays flowers with German president

    The Queen was joined by the President of Germany, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, to lay flowers on the grave of the unknown warrior in Westminster Abbey.

    Among the bouquets was rosemary, for remembrance, heather, for admiration, and ivy, for eternal life.

    The Queen and President Frank-Walter Steinmeier
    Image caption: The Queen and President Frank-Walter Steinmeier
    The grave of the unknown warrior was surrounded by fresh flowers
    Image caption: The grave of the unknown warrior was surrounded by fresh flowers
  13. The Queen and Royal Family arrive at Westminster Abbey

    The Queen enters the abbey for the service
    Image caption: The Queen enters the abbey for the service
    Prince Charles, followed by his wife Camilla, walk into the abbey
    Image caption: Prince Charles, followed by his wife Camilla, walk into the abbey
    The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive for the service
    Image caption: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive for the service
    The Duke and Duchess of Sussex arrive at the abbey
    Image caption: The Duke and Duchess of Sussex arrive at the abbey
    The Duchess of Sussex is greeted at the abbey by Theresa May
    Image caption: The Duchess of Sussex is greeted inside by Theresa May
  14. Public figures start to arrive for Westminster Abbey service

    Prime Minister Theresa May and her husband Philip arrive at Westminster Abbey
    Image caption: Prime Minister Theresa May and her husband Philip arrive at Westminster Abbey
    Her predecessor, David Cameron, is also pictured arriving for the service
    Image caption: Her predecessor, David Cameron, is also pictured arriving for the service
    Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson joins them for the service
    Image caption: Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson joins the politicians in Westminster
    Metropolitan Police commissioner Cressida Dick also arrives for the event in London
    Image caption: Metropolitan Police commissioner Cressida Dick also arrives for the event in London
  15. Minute's silence ahead of Manchester derby

    Footballers, fans and officials held a minute's silence before this afternoon's Manchester derby.

    Huge City and United banners were draped over the Blues' pitch at the Etihad Stadium while the words "Manchester Remembers" were displayed on the screens.

    Players, fans and officials observe a silence for Remembrance Day prior to the Premier League match between Manchester City and Manchester United

    Former United player Sir Bobby Charlton and City's Mike Summerbee lay a wreath to mark Remembrance Sunday.

    Former United player Sir Bobby Charlton and City's Mike Summerbee lay a wreath
  16. Service in town that built military vehicles for the war

    Hundreds gathered at the war memorial in Leyland - the Lancashire town best known for manufacturing trucks and buses since the 1890s.

    During the war, Leyland Motors had to double its workforce to 3,000 to cope with the demand for military vehicles.

    According to the company's archives, workers built nearly 6,000 vehicles for the British forces.

    Remembrance Day service at the cenotaph in Leyland
    Poppy wreaths at the cenotaph in Leyland
  17. Benches dedicated in 'thankful' village

    Bench

    Two benches have been dedicated in a community known as a "thankful" village, after everyone from there who went to fight in World War One came back alive.

    Twenty men from Harley in Shropshire survived and people from the area have been researching them in recent months ahead of today's events.

    One bench was dedicated in St Mary's church and the other in the village hall, where a war-themed lunch was held earlier.

    There are about 60 such villages in the UK.

    Village hall
  18. Commemorations in Poland overshadowed by far-right groups

    Annual celebrations have become a magnet for the far right

    The centenary of the Armistice is particularly poignant for Poland as it marks 100 years to the day that Poland regained independence after the defeat of Germany, Russia and Austria in World War One.

    A march in Poland to celebrate the centenary of the country's independence has been overshadowed by the participation of far-right groups.

    Nationalists were among thousands of people to join celebrations in the capital, Warsaw, which were being led by President Andrzej Duda.

    Opposition parties boycotted the march.

    Red flares filled the streets of Warsaw with smoke

    It comes as French President Emmanuel Macron urged world leaders marking the centenary of the World War One Armistice to reject nationalism.

    Most participants in today's march in Warsaw were seen carrying Polish flags and wearing red-and-white armbands, but some were holding banners representing far-right parties from Poland and Italy.

    President Duda had said he wanted the march to be a proud and joyful celebration and warned that anyone carrying offensive banners or chanting the types of slogans heard at last year's event - such as "Pure Poland, white Poland" - would be dealt with by the police.

  19. Van artwork in tribute to the fallen

    Artist Shaun Harvey, from Lincolnshire, paid tribute to the fallen with this unusual piece of work on the back of a muddy van.

    Van