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By Lynsey Bradford

All times stated are UK

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  1. No government-funded trees planted in Lincoln since 2010

    No government-funded trees have been planted in Lincoln between 2010 and 2018, Forestry Commission data shows.

    Lincoln was among about a third of English districts that did not get any government-funded trees. Almost all of these were urban areas and the government has promised to spend £10m planting trees in towns and cities.

    Forest

    Between 2010 and 2018 the government funded about 15 million trees in England. Figures for trees planted with private funds or by local councils are not included and the data only covers new trees, not replacements for any that were cut down.

    Overall tree planting rates across the UK would need to more than double to combat rising temperatures and climate change, according to official figures.

    Last year 13,400 hectares of new trees were planted across the UK, most of them in Scotland, but the Committee on Climate Change says this should rise to at least 30,000 hectares a year.

    Campaign group The Woodland Trust said more trees were needed to provide summer shade, reduce air pollution, improve water quality and manage flooding.

    The government said it had made it "much easier" to apply for planting grants.

    Find out about tree planting across the UK here.

    This story has been generated using Forestry Commission data, BBC analysis and some automation.

  2. Two teenagers arrested following sexual assault

    Two teenage boys have been arrested following reports of a sexual assault in Holbeach.

    Police

    The incident is said to have happened at about 20:30 on Monday in the Stukeley Hall park area of the town.

    Lincolnshire Police say the two boys, aged 13 and 16, are being held in custody following their arrest.

    The force has appealed for anyone who was in the area between 19:00 and 20:30 and can help with the investigation to come forward.

  3. Coroner: Lorry driver could not avoid collision with teen

    A teenage girl died when she was hit by lorry after stepping into the road with a friend, an inquest has been told.

    Eliza Bill

    Eliza Bill, 16, was struck on the A15 in Osbournby last December after her school bus had broken down.

    It's thought she was trying cross the road to meet her father who had come to collect her.

    A 14-year old girl was also injured.

    Giving evidence at Boston Coroner's Court, the lorry driver said he couldn't see the girls until they stepped into the road and there was nothing he could do to avoid the collision.

    The coroner ruled Eliza died as a result of a road traffic collision and said there was nothing more the driver could have done.

  4. Concern for missing teenager

    Police say they are concerned for the safety of a missing 16-year-old girl.

    Diem Quynh Tran

    Diem Quynh Tran - also known as Quynh - has been missing from Wainfleet, near Skegness, since 24 July.

    She was last seen at Skegness Train Station and is believed to have boarded a train heading towards Nottingham.

    Lincolnshire Police say it is possible she may have changed the colour of her hair.

    Anyone who has seen Quynh or can help with her whereabouts should contact police.

  5. Chef helps homeless to get back into work

    A former chef has set up a community kitchen in Horncastle to teach homeless and vulnerable people the skills they need to get back into work.

    Lee Bowman

    Lee Bowman is training them in food hygiene and preparation - whilst feeding the community at the same time.

    He hopes the group of 10 people currently signed up will in time be able to take over the running of the project themselves.

    He said he's been impressed by people's commitment: "We've not had one person walk away from the project yet. Everyone has come in and been fully engaged, they've settled down and they're leaving already with qualifications. It's amazing."

  6. Cannabis farm worth estimated £4m uncovered in Scunthorpe

    Cannabis with a street value of up to £4m has been seized after police raided an industrial unit in Scunthorpe.

    The cannabis

    Humberside Police found about 15,000 plants growing inside the premises in Park Farm Road on Monday.

    Following the raid two men, aged 29 and 48, have been arrested on suspicion of producing a controlled drug and a 50-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of supplying a controlled drug. All three remain in custody.

    The cannabis

    Det Insp Kerry Bull said: “This premises has been converted into an industrial sized professional cannabis grow.

    “I believe that there are in excess of 15,000 plants in various stages of cultivation."

  7. 7,200 government-funded trees planted in Boston in eight years

    There have been 7,200 government-funded trees planted in Boston between 2010 and 2018, Forestry Commission data shows.

    This works out at 105 trees per 1,000 people.

    Between 2010 and 2018 the government funded about 15 million trees in England. Figures for trees planted with private funds or by local councils are not included and the data only covers new trees, not replacements for any that were cut down.

    Overall tree planting rates across the UK would need to more than double to combat rising temperatures and climate change, according to official figures.

    Last year 13,400 hectares of new trees were planted across the UK, most of them in Scotland, but the Committee on Climate Change says this should rise to at least 30,000 hectares a year.

    Campaign group The Woodland Trust said more trees were needed to provide summer shade, reduce air pollution, improve water quality and manage flooding.

    The government said it had made it "much easier" to apply for planting grants.

    Find out about tree planting across the UK here.

    This story has been generated using Forestry Commission data, BBC analysis and some automation.

  8. Much-loved paddling pool closed for two days

    A popular paddling pool in Skegness will be closed until Thursday because of damage to the filter and circulation outlets.

    The Fairy Dell - which was designated as an Asset of Community Value in April - will be closed today and tomorrow.

    Alongside the paddling pool on the site, the Fairy Dell is used for a variety of community functions and serves as a quiet recreation area during months when the paddling pool is not in use.

    It almost closed several years ago but was saved after a community campaign:

    View more on twitter
  9. 142,900 government-funded trees planted in South Kesteven in eight years

    There have been 142,900 government-funded trees planted in South Kesteven between 2010 and 2018, Forestry Commission data shows.

    This works out at 1,009 trees per 1,000 people.

    Between 2010 and 2018 the government funded about 15 million trees in England. Figures for trees planted with private funds or by local councils are not included and the data only covers new trees, not replacements for any that were cut down.

    Overall tree planting rates across the UK would need to more than double to combat rising temperatures and climate change, according to official figures.

    Last year 13,400 hectares of new trees were planted across the UK, most of them in Scotland, but the Committee on Climate Change says this should rise to at least 30,000 hectares a year.

    Campaign group The Woodland Trust said more trees were needed to provide summer shade, reduce air pollution, improve water quality and manage flooding.

    The government said it had made it "much easier" to apply for planting grants.

    Find out about tree planting across the UK here.

    This story has been generated using Forestry Commission data, BBC analysis and some automation.

  10. Gainsborough pub conversion plans spark concerns

    Councillors are being asked to reject plans to convert a former pub into an off-licence near Gainsborough, after a raid at the property earlier this year found evidence of squalid living conditions.

    The pub

    The former Crooked Billet pub in Morton was entered by West Lindsey District Council enforcement teams in February this year.

    It followed police reports of evidence of modern-day slavery and poor living conditions in the upstairs accommodation.

    A Slovakian man was found living in squalid conditions and was reportedly being paid £35 a day while working on the building.

    Officers say they also found electrical wires hanging from the ceiling, and the building was "dangerous".

    Emergency orders were issued to the owners, but a further inspection the following month found two men still working on the properly along with evidence that people were still living there.

    Sarah Cattell, housing and enforcement team lead, said she had strong reason to believe the owner would be operating a House in Multiple Occupation (HMO) above the shop and had little confidence he would apply for the appropriate licence, or manage the HMO effectively.

    West Lindsey’s licensing sub committee will meet next week.

  11. Millions spent on replacing Lincolnshire's fire engines

    Lincolnshire Fire & Rescue is to replace all 33 of its fire engines at a cost of £8m.

    The new fire engine

    From today, crews will start training on the new vehicles before they start appearing on the county's roads from September.

    The vehicles are being introduced over the next three years.

    The new fire engine

    Chief Fire Officer Les Britzman said the vehicles are state of the art in terms of safety and have been completely redesigned, taking efficiency and economy in to account. He said crews had been consulted about what was required.

    He said: "It's the first time I've seen one designed 100% fit for purpose. It's quite impressive."

  12. Anger as village green hedge is ripped up

    A hedge in Keelby which hundreds of people campaigned to save has been removed by the parish council.

    The hedge

    Villagers joined forces in May to try to persuade the town council not to remove the hedgerow and hawthorn bushes at the entrance of the village green.

    More than 1,000 people signed a petition and thought the hedges were there to stay.

    But diggers have since been to the site and removed them.

    Children look at the space where the hedge used to be

    Campaigner Louise Drakes said: "We don't know what the story is, but it was all agreed at the parish council meeting in May that they were going to raise the canopy and change the gate and review it again in August. But then they bulldozed it."

    The BBC has contacted the council but has not yet had a response.

  13. Boston businesses asked for views on Brexit

    Businesses in Boston are being encouraged to talk to government officials about Brexit later.

    Union flag and EU flag

    A free event is due to take place at Boston Enterprise Centre from 14:30, led by staff from the Department for Business Energy and Industrial Strategy and "officials from across government".

    They want to hear about the benefits and challenges of running a business locally.

    They're also expected to share information about how companies can prepare for leaving the EU.

  14. Big fall in Boston street drinker numbers

    There's been a dramatic drop in the number of street drinking reports in Boston, according to police in the town.

    Last year, officers dealt with more than 150 incidents, but so far this year only 17 calls have been made about it.

    Police say the efforts of officers last year have paid off.

    But Andy Fisher, from Boston Borough Council, says the problem hasn't yet been solved:

    "I wouldn't want anybody to think that you'll never see anyone consuming alcohol in Boston.

    "But, through a mixture of education and enforcement, we've worked with people who would visibly drink on benches, in the park and in the town centre and just walking through the town."