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Summary

  1. The day in the Commons began at 11.30 GMT with questions to the ministerial team at the Foreign Office.
  2. MPs accepted Geoffrey Clifton-Brown's ten minute rule bill to remove a time limit on overseas UK citizens right to vote.
  3. MPs will then took part in an emergency debate, granted yesterday, on the ban by China on the Foreign Affairs Committee visit to Hong Kong, led by Sir Richard Ottaway.
  4. The day's main business was the second reading of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.
  5. The adjournment debate was on government policy on tackling corruption, led by MP Stephen Barclay.
  6. Peers began the day at 14.30 GMT with oral questions.
  7. The day's main business was the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill at second reading.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The conclusion of the Commons adjournment debate brings to an end our live coverage of today in Parliament.

    The House of Commons will sit tomorrow from 11.30 GMT for another busy day, which will include prime minister's questions and the chancellor's autumn statement.

  2. Karen Bradley replies

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In fact, the duty of replying to Mr Barclay for the government falls to Home Office Minister Karen Bradley.

    She says Mr Hancock's appointment as anti-corruption minister is a part of the government's actions against corruption.

    Karen Bradley
  3. Tackling corruption debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn their attention to today's final business, the adjournment debate on government policy on tackling corruption, led by Conservative MP Stephen Barclay,

    Mr Barclay says the new government strategy, due to be published soon, provides a chance for Parliament to look at the way the City of London handles corruption - and the revenue from corruption abroad which is finding its way into City financial institutions.

    The new anti-corruption minister, Matthew Hancock, is expected to reply.

  4. Bill passes second reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Despite some concerns raised during the debate, MPs unanimously agree to give the Counter-Terrorism Bill its second reading.

    The bill will now pass to committee stage, where a committee of the whole House will give the bill line-by-line scrutiny.

    MPs also agree to a programme motion setting out the bill's passage through Parliament.

    Committee stage will be held over three days on 9, 15 and 16 December.

  5. Goodnight from the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers unanimously agree to give the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill its second reading. Which brings business in the Lords to an the end.

    Peers will return tomorrow for the second day of committee stage debate on the Modern Slavery Bill.

    Stay with us as MPs continue to scrutinise the Counter Terrorism Bill at second reading.

  6. 'Terrorism threat'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate for the government, Home Office minister James Brokenshire reaffirms that the terrorism threat to the UK is as bad as any time since 9/11.

    It is Parliament's "duty to ensure our law enforcement agencies that have the tools to keep us safe", he says.

    Responding to concerns about encroachment on civil liberties, he says that security and liberty are not mutually exclusive and should instead be seen as "mutually reinforcing".

    You cannot have "liberty without security", he says, and tells MPs that liberty is the government's goal.

  7. Summing up on the bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Business, Innovation and Skills Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe is summing up for the government after nearly five hours of debate on the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill.

  8. Labour response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Diana Johnson
    Image caption: Home Office Minister Diana Johnson is responding to the debate for Labour
  9. 'Benefit every region'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Opposition spokesman Lord Mendelsohn is summing up for Labour in the Small Business Bill debate.

    He says his party broadly supports the bill.

    He adds that measures to provide small firms with fair access to government procurement contracts should be used to benefit firms "in every region of the UK".

  10. 'Here we go again'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "Here we go again," SNP MP Pete Wishart says, referring to the short amount of time MPs will be given to scrutinise the new counter-terrorism measures - which he says has been "predictably" accompanied by a rise in the terror threat.

    He points out to MPs that there have now been seven counter-terrorism bills passed since 9/11, all of which were fast-tracked through Parliament.

    "We're invited to believe... that no one is safe, terror is everywhere, that is why we need this legislation as quickly as possible," he says.

    "Just like we've needed all the other bills as quickly as possible."

    He argues that illiberal ideas and unnecessary powers are often sneaked through in bills such as this.

  11. Director disqualification

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Over in the Lords, Conservative peer Lord Leigh of Hurley is speaking in the second reading debate of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill.

    He praises the bill's measures to tighten the rules on director disqualification.

    He tells peers that 20,000 businesses go into insolvency procedures each year, and people would not want a new business to be run by people who ran another business "into the ground".

  12. 'We faced terrorism before'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Martin Horwood, the Liberal Democrat MP for Cheltenham, which houses the main office of the government communications agency GCHQ, says it is important that Parliament guard against over-reacting, or reacting in such haste that it compromises the "very liberties we are seeking to protect".

    He reminds MPs that "we have faced terrorism before" in different forms.

    The bill broadly "strikes the right balance", he says, and indicates he will support its measures, but warns MPs that they should not forget their responsibilities due to fear of terrorist attacks.

    It is not for the security services to draw the line between liberty and security, he adds.

  13. Propaganda wars

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Dr Julian Lewis calls for the creation of a "counter-propaganda agency" to develop a "counter narrative" to extremists as well as supporting communities in their efforts to challenge radicals.

    There is an "ideological struggle" going on, Dr Lewis tells MPs, and complains that the government lack the capacity to neutralise ideology that "infects people" in the first place.

    There needs to be a return to war time efforts to expose and denounce fascism, and cold war campaigns to counter totalitarianism, he says.

  14. Where's the DCLG?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Counter-Terrorism Minister Hazel Blears says that there needs to be a broader view around the counter terrorism agenda.

    It is not enough to tackle violent extremism, the environment that allows violent extremism to build also needs to be tackled, she says. While parts of the bill are welcome she calls for the Communities and Local Government Department to set out an anti-radicalisation agenda.

  15. Future problems?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Today's debate will give us a good idea of the scale of problems the bill may face at later stages - and MPs will be seeing a lot of it in the near future - because detailed consideration will be via three days in committee of the whole House on Tuesday 9, Monday 15 and Tuesday 16 December.

  16. Concern on speed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    During an intervention Labour MP Chris Bryant says it is a "nonsense" that when it comes to legislation on things like circus animals the government always "drags its heels", but when it comes to legislation on the "liberty of the individual" they always have to rush it through the House.

    Mr Bryant's comments refer to the recent emergency surveillance legislation - the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014 - which cleared parliament in just three days in July.

  17. Committee plea

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Home Affairs Committee Keith Vaz complains that his committee has not had enough time to consider the bill before it came to the House of Commons.

    Emergency pieces of legislation should lead to ministers appearing before the relevant select committees, he says.

  18. Support for bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Attorney General Dominic Grieve offers his support to the bill. He tells MPs that his former role allowed him to see that the terrorist threat against the UK are not being exaggerated.

    While he welcomes the bill he flags some potential technical legal problems in the bill - including the removal of passports possibly interfering with peoples right to a family life, protected by the European Convention on Human Rights, which may lead to increased compensation claims against the government.

    As the bill passes through the Commons, MPs must be careful not to create the very "resentments" in society that lead to terrorist activity, he warns.

    "We will stop this phenomenon when we can persuade people that the virtues of our society are considerable and its values should be respected," he says.

  19. Peer attacks unpaid internships

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Mitchell attacks the practice of using unpaid interns, including in Parliament.

    "Unpaid internships are another form of slavery," he declares.

    He adds that, while internships can open doors for "rich kids", they do not help those from less well-off backgrounds and interns should be paid.

  20. Labour's concerns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper says plans for statutory temporary exclusion orders, to control the return to the UK of British citizens suspected of terrorist activity, actually provide no powers to exclude people. The measure has instead been designed to "give the prime minister the headlines he wanted".

    Questions surround what would happen if countries do not want to cooperate with the exclusion orders, and the speed of the powers and safeguards to prevent abuse of the orders remain, she says.

    There are not sufficient checks and balances on the requirement on communications firms to hand details to police identifying who was using a computer or mobile phone at a given time - to ensure that it does "what it was intended to do" and doesn't allow unregulated snooping - Ms Cooper says.

    Yvette Cooper
    Image caption: Yvette Cooper lays out the issues Labour has with the bill
  21. Baroness Harding's maiden speech

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Baroness Harding of Winscombe is making her maiden speech in the Lords.

    She gives thanks for "the tremendous help of all the staff as well as your Lordships" since she joined the Upper House in September.

    Talk Talk executive Diana Harding - known as Dido - is not such a stranger to Parliament, however.

    While her father, hereditary peer Lord Harding, does not sit in the Lords, Baroness Harding is married to Conservative MP and government whip John Penrose.

  22. Post update

    ‏@LibDemLords

    Lib Dem Lords tweets: Lib Dem @GregMulholland1 wide ranging reforms to pubs and intro of pub code adjudicator. Lib Dem commitments now in Small Business Bill

  23. Labour's response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper is now responding for Labour.

    Labour will support the bill, she says, but feels amendments need to be made to the bill in order to protect the "liberty and freedom" of people, as well as keep them from harm.

    More needs to be done to prevent people from being drawn into extremism, and while she supports putting the existing Prevent programme on a statutory footing she says more needs to be done to help community-led programmes - which, she says, are more effective than police or government-led projects.

    She asks why the new powers to impose relocation orders on TPIM subjects have been limited to 200 miles from their homes and indicates that Labour will seek to find out why there is a clause inserted to ban those on TPIMs from having access to firearms - something she says most would assume is illegal.

    Labour is also worried about the lack of judicial oversight over removing people's passports and cancelling passports at the border for up to 30 days to ensure the power is not abused.

  24. Sugar not sweet on bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Sugar claims the Small Business Bill "does not go far enough to offer practical, common sense solutions for small business".

    He says that late payment of bills causes severe problems for small businesses but claims the bill does nothing to improve the situation.

    The Apprentice star advised Gordon Brown's government as a so-called "enterprise tsar".

    Lord Sugar
  25. Small business measures

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Away from pubs and beer, the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill's other measures to help small firms include making it easier to access finance and ensuring that regulations are reviewed regularly.

    The bill aims to provide small firms with fair access to the £230bn spent every year on government procurement contracts.

    It aims to increase transparency in ownership of businesses and tightens the rules on director disqualification.

    It also strengthens enforcement of the UK minimum wage, while tackling the abuse of zero hours contracts.

  26. Struggle with 'deadly ideology'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Drawing her remarks to a close Home Secretary Theresa May says the need for the legislation is "pressing".

    "We are in the midst of a generational struggle with a deadly ideology," she says, and Parliament needs to ensure security forces have all the powers and capabilities they need to tackle this terrorist threat.

  27. Data measures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Secretary Theresa May is setting out one of the more controversial parts of the bill - the requirement on communications service providers to retain the data that would allow relevant authorities to identify the individual or the device that was using a particular internet protocol (IP) address at any given time.

    It will also require the government and local authorities to have policies in place to prevent people being drawn into terrorism and ban insurers from paying ransoms to terrorists.

    The government has run into trouble on this kind of issue before, notably over the Communications Data Bill, where Tory and Lib Dem backbenchers objected. The Tory dissenters' objections don't seem to be quite so intense on this measure.

    Mrs May says these measures will provide "vital additional capability" to law enforcement on investigating a broad range of crime.

    This bill only deals with limited fields of data though, she says. Without the full range of measures contained in the Communications Data Bill police services will still have "gaps in their capabilities", she adds.

  28. Post update

    ‏@Lord_Sugar

    Lord Sugar tweets: I will be speaking in the House of Lords in a while on the Small Businesses Bill. You can tune in here.

  29. 'Chapter 11' bankruptcy call

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Bilimoria, the Indian-born entrepreneur behind Cobra Beer, argues that the UK should have an equivalent of "Chapter 11" bankruptcy, which is available in the United States.

    Named after the US bankruptcy code 11, Chapter 11 involves a reorganization of a debtor's business affairs and assets.

    While complex and expensive, this form of bankruptcy allows debtors time to reorganise their debts and to have the potential for a fresh start.

    Lord Bilimoria says the process, while painful, saves companies and "saves brands" and asks the government for its response to his proposal.

  30. Post update

    @ChrisBryantMP

    Labour MP Chris Bryant tweets: Will new powers temporarily to exile British citizens without a proper judicial process make Britain safer?

  31. New measures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill is a seven-part measure which includes:

    • Counter-radicalisation measures - requirements that schools, colleges and probation providers help prevent people being radicalised
    • Changes to TPIMs - Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures - to allow the authorities to force suspects to move to another part of the country
    • Raising the burden of proof for imposing TPIMs from "reasonable belief" to "balance of probabilities"
    • Greater powers to disrupt people heading abroad to fight - including cancelling passports at the border for up to 30 days
    • Statutory temporary exclusion orders to control return to the UK of British citizens suspected of terrorist activity
    • Tighter aviation security - requiring airlines to provide passenger data more quickly and effectively
    • Banning insurance companies from covering ransoms
    • Forcing firms to hand details to police identifying who was using a computer or mobile phone at a given time.

    An official explanation of the bill can be found here.

  32. More on 'tied pubs'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The beer tie amendment was put forward by Lib Dem MP Greg Mulholland during Commons consideration of the Small Business Bill, and its approval was a defeat for the government.

    The British Beer and Pub Association said the amendment was "hugely damaging" to the industry and large pub companies argued that the beer tie was the only way to get a pub off the ground.

    However, the Federation of Small Businesses called the Commons vote a "historic day for tied publicans" who will get a "more open" marketplace.

    Research for the Campaign for Real Ale found tied pubs paying £150 for a keg of Fosters lager, compared to £84.99 on the open market.

  33. Enhanced security measures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Setting out the argument for the bill, Home Secretary Theresa May tells MPs around 40 planned terror attacks had been foiled since the 7 July bombings in London in 2005.

    The threat from terrorism is become "evermore complex and diverse" she says.

    Earlier this year the terror threat level in Britain was raised from "substantial" to "severe" in response to conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

    Theresa May
    Image caption: Theresa May argues that the time is right for enhanced security measures
  34. Terror bill consideration

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs unanimously agree the motion - which states "that this House has considered the ban by China on the Foreign Affairs Committee visit to Hong Kong".

    MPs now turn their attention to the second reading, and therefore the first debate, of the newly published Counter Terrorism and Security Bill.

  35. Universal suffrage

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Drawing his remarks to a close Foreign Office Minister Hugo Swire says the government believe a transfer to universal suffrage in Hong Kong will safeguard the province's future "safety and prosperity".

    The government is encouraging all parties to engage in dialogue and believe there is scope for a consensuses that will delver a meaningful democracy in Hong Kong consistent with the 1984 joint deceleration.

    Hugo Swire
    Image caption: Foreign Office Minister Hugo Swire
  36. Labour attacks 'recovery' claim

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Shadow business, innovation and skills spokesman Lord Stevenson of Balmacara, speaking on the Small Business Bill, attacks the coalition government's claim to have secured economic recovery.

    "Short-termism is still endemic in business and in government," he argues.

    "Meanwhile, the use of food banks has soared and many people are still struggling," he adds.

  37. 'Unjustified and counter productive'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Foreign Office Minister Hugo Swire condemns China's actions as "not in the spirit of the Sino-British Joint Declaration". The government has repeatedly explained that the Foreign Affairs Committee is completely independent of government,

    Mr Swire says that when he met the Vice Minister of the Communist Party International Liaison Department this morning he pointed out that barring the committee form Hong Kong is "unjustified and counter productive" and runs contrary to bi-lateral advancements in the UK's relationship with China.

  38. 'Beer tie' broken

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Two weeks ago MPs voted to add an amendment to the Small Business Bill allowing pub landlords to break the "beer tie" system.

    Under the beer tie, pub landlords pay rents below the market rate but have to buy beer from the owners. Now, publicans will be able to choose to be tied, or to buy beer at the market rate.

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe says the government initially opposed the move but will not attempt to reverse the Commons' decision.

    "The elected chamber has spoken by voting this into the bill and the government has listened," she says.

  39. Duty to speak up

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow foreign affairs minister Kerry McCarthy is now responding to the debate for Labour.

    She says as a signatory of the 1984 joint declaration the UK has a duty to speak up if the agreement is not fully upheld.

    Kerry McCarthy
    Image caption: Shadow foreign affairs minister Kerry McCarthy sets out Labour's position on the China's decision to block British MPs' visit to Hong Kong
  40. Second reading begins

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe opens the debate on the Small Business Bill.

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe
  41. Chinese attitude

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chinese authorities condemned the committee's inquiry when it was announced in September.

    The Chinese Foreign Affairs Committee charged its UK counterpart with carrying out a "highly inappropriate act which constitutes interference in China's internal affairs".

    Conservative MP John Baron says he believes Chinese authorities argument shows "fundamental wish to ignore the facts" about the workings of Parliament for political ends. A country the size and strength of China must know that committees are not the "mouthpieces of government", he says, and their fact-finding missions do not constitute as foreign governments interfering.

    The fact that China has reneged on the 1984 treaty doesn't just have implications for the China, he says. The UK risks being "dishonourable as a country" if it doesn't hold China to its commitments in the joint decleration, he says.

  42. Small Business Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Questions are over and peers begin the second reading debate on the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill.

    Second reading is an opportunity for peers to debate the main principles of a bill.

    The bill contains a series of measures aimed at helping small and medium-sized businesses.

    Opening the debate, Business, Innovation and Skills Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe says small firms "have always been the lifeblood of our economy".

  43. Call to accept asylum seekers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Foulkes calls for a more "sympathetic" consideration of asylum claims from Syria.

    International Development Minister Baroness Northover insists the UK is "contributing disproportionately" to aid for Syrian refugees.

  44. Voucher scheme suspended

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Yesterday, the UN World Food Program announced it was suspending its food voucher programme for Syrian refugees.

    Refugees in Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq and Egypt received vouchers that could be spent on food in local shops.

    The WFP suspended the scheme after failing to secure the $64m it needed to continue until the end of December.

  45. Implications

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Affairs Committee chairman Keith Vaz says today's debate has implications for all parliamentary committees.

    He says he is "not so arrogant" to think the Chinese leaders are watching the debate, but that the House of Commons must set a precedent and demand from the Foreign Office - which committees rely on to help organise visits abroad - a guarantee they will "endeavour to try and persuade the Chinese government to change their mind".

    He adds that he has huge sympathy for Sir Richard Ottoway - the Foreign Affairs Committee chair - who must have seen a lot of hard work wasted by the visa ban. The House of Commons "doesn't understand the huge amount of time and effort from chairs of committees and committee clerks" needed organise a committee trip abroad, Mr Vaz says.

  46. Urgent question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Private notice questions, known as urgent questions in the House of Commons, are a way for peers to require a minister to provide an answer on a topical issue at short notice.

    Lord Beecham says he is concerned that militant groups such as Islamic State might use the "tragedy" of the refugee crisis in Syria "for their own ends" if more help is not made available.

    Baroness Northover says the UK has helped to raise billions of dollars to assist refugees in the region.

  47. Syrian refugees question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour frontbencher Lord Beecham is asking an additional, private notice question in the Lords.

    He asks what is being done to relieve the suffering of Syrian refugees and the pressure on their host countries, in the light of the suspension of the UN's food voucher programme for want of funding.

  48. Crossroads with China?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Andrew Rosindell says tells MPs "we are at a crossroads, where serious decision must be taken". China cannot take British cooperation for granted, and the government must be prepared to fundamentally reconsider UK's relationship with China, he says.

    Britain is a "strong nation" with the sixth largest economy in the world that "cannot, and will not" be bullied. The government shouldn't be afraid to stand firm against China "simply in fear of potential trade implications" as trade with China "is largely one sided" he says.

    If China fails to honour its obligations in the joint declaration then Britain "will have no choice but to conclude that the hand of friendship and trust held out by Margaret Thatcher 30 years ago has been betrayed", he says.

  49. EU research budget

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The fourth question in the Lords is from Conservative peer Baroness O'Cathain, on protecting the EU research budget.

  50. Fracking in Wales

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The third question in the Lords is from Plaid Cymru peer Lord Wigley, asking what representations UK ministers have received from the Welsh government concerning the control and management of fracking for gas in Wales.

  51. Stateless in Kuwait

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Avebury asks the second question, on granting citizenship to the stateless Bidoon residents in Kuwait.

    He urges the UK government to press Kuwait's rulers to accept these "stateless" people.

    The name "bidoon" comes from the Arabic "bidūn jinsīyah", meaning "without nationality".

  52. Home Office criticised

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer and former Home Secretary Lord Reid, who memorably once described his department as "not fit for purpose", tells the minister that help for Afghan interpreters "will not be speeded up it is left to the Home Office".

    He urges Ministry of Defence involvement.

  53. Afghan interpreters

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Defence Minister Lord Astor of Hever attempts to reassure the House that the government is taking action on behalf of Afghan interpreters who face threats as a result of their work with UK forces.

    "Anyone who feels in any danger will contact our staff," he tells peers.

  54. First Lords question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Questions in the Lords are underway.

    Crossbench peer Baroness Coussins has the first question, asking how many Afghan interpreters have applied for relocation to the UK.

  55. Lords business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Today's business in the House of Lords will start shortly, with questions to government ministers.

    Then, Labour's Lord Beecham will ask a private notice question on what steps the government is taking to relieve the suffering of Syrian refugees.

    The main business is the second reading of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill.

    With a packed agenda in the Commons, it is quite likely that peers will be going home before MPs today, despite their later start time.

  56. Post update

    @kiranstacey

    Political correspondent for the FT Kiran Stacey ‏tweets: Turns out another MP has bn excluded from China: Richard Graham, head of China all-party group, reveals he was refused a visa 10 days ago.

  57. Emergency debates rare

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Emergency debates are very rare. Since 2012, five applications for an emergency debate have been declined by the Speaker - who is forbidden from giving any reasons for his decision.

    But despite the significance of this debate a vote to back the motion is not binding on the government. It would not change government policy, but it could have international implications and guide future decisions.

  58. Unprecedented

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir John Stanley, who has been a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee since 1992, says the committee has never before been refused entry to a county.

    During the last visit to China the committee were subject to "threats and intimidation" to deter them from heading to Tibet and then to Taiwan, but never turned away - this is dangerous precedent for Parliament, he says.

    He says he is unsure what China is hoping to achieve and but claims the Chinese authorities have scored a "spectacular own goal" in denying the committee a visa.

    The Chinese government "could not give more eloquent credence" to the case being made by pro-democracy protestors in Hong Kong that the joint deceleration is under threat, he says.

  59. Anger at insult

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour veteran Sir Gerald Kaufman says he was present at the handover from the United Kingdom to the Chinese government - which he calls a "day of shame" for Britain.

    MPs should be more "realistic" about China, which he says is a country which tortures, imprisons without trial and has no genuine freedom of speech.

    The House of Commons can't transform China, he tells MPs, but it is "very, very, very important" for it to register its anger at what has taken place "and the insult to the Foreign Affairs Committee and therefore to this House of Commons", he says.

  60. Obligation to monitor

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Malcolm Rifkind, who was foreign secretary in 1997 when Hong Kong was transferred to Chinese government control, says that it is an obligation of the government and the parliamentary committees under the joint deceleration to monitor what is going on in Hong Kong.

  61. Free trip?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Ann Clwyd offers a ray of hope that China will change its mind.

    She tells MPs the story of when she went with a delegation of MPs to Hong Kong only to be turned away when attempting to cross to mainland China. The Chinese embassy later apologised, she tells MPs, and admitted the refusal had been a "bad mistake". The group was later offered the a free trip to China as way of an apology.

  62. 'Shock' on learning of Beijing's visa block

    The Daily Telegraph

    China's decision to ban a group of British MPs from visiting Hong Kong calls into question the country's status as a "global player" and further highlights Beijing's erosion of legal and political freedoms in the former colony, one of Hong Kong's most influential political voices has claimed.

    In an interview with The Telegraph, Anson Chan, the former head of Hong Kong's civil service, said she had been "shocked" to learn Beijing had barred the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee from travelling to the former British colony later this month.

  63. Decision 'a mistake'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Opening the debate Sir Richard Ottoway calls the decision by the Chinese government to ban the committee a "mistake" and "an attack on the men and women of the free world".

    The Foreign Affairs Committee will continue with its inquiry, but this decision cannot "go unchallenged" he says and invites the government to condemn this action in the "strongest possible terms".

    The decision will have a "profound impact" he says. Visa matters are devolved to the Hong Kong administration, and the Chinese government's interference means the the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration - which transferred Hong Kong from British to Chinese control - is now under threat.

    After giving a brief history of Hong Kong, Sir Richard tells MPs that the heart of the joint declaration was a commitment to a "one country, two system" style of government and a pledge that the socialist style of government of Chinese mainland would not be imposed on Hong Kong. It is now in question whether this declaration has any meaning, he says.

    Sir Richard Ottoway
    Image caption: Sir Richard Ottoway says if China wants to be a member of the G20 it should "start acting like a G20 country"
  64. What's happening in Hong Kong today?

    Hong Kong police have clashed with pro-democracy activists overnight, briefly shutting down government offices on Monday.

    Protesters fought police armed with pepper spray, batons and water hoses on Lung Wo Road in the Admiralty district.

    On Monday, an injunction was granted to clear an area just west of the main Admiralty protest site.

    That sparked fears of more violence after what was already some of the worst unrest in two months of protests.

    Police rush down Lung Wo road tunnel to clear pro-democracy protesters on December 1, 2014 in Hong Kong.
    Image caption: Police rushed at protesters on Lung Wo Road tunnel, to clear pro-democracy protesters on 1 December 2014 in Hong Kong.
  65. Refused entry

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Chinese embassy has told the Foreign Affairs Committee it will be stopped from making a planned fact finding trip to Hong Kong.

    The committee is examining relations between the UK and its former colony, where pro-democracy activists have been protesting since September.

    The demonstrators want elections free from interference by Beijing.

    Sir Richard Ottoway, who chairs the committee, says he had been warned that if he and fellow MPs attempted to travel to Hong Kong as part of the inquiry they would be refused entry.

  66. Emergency debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn their attention to the emergency debate on China's decision to block the Foreign Affairs Committee's fact finding visit to Hong Kong.

    The debate was granted yesterday after MPs approved Committee chair Sir Richard Ottoway's application for a debate under Standing Order 24.

    Under Standing Order 24, an MP has three minutes to make the case for an emergency debate and if the Speaker grants the request, the emergency debate will take place within 24 hours.

  67. Floating an idea

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs unanimously agree to Mr Clifton-Brown's bill. However, this does not necessarily mean we'll soon see British pensioners who've been living in the Costa Del Sol for the last 20 years voting in the 2015 election.

    The government will only rarely allow a ten minute rule bill to progress far enough to become law.

    Ten minute rule bills are instead popular with MPs as they are a high profile way of gaining publicity for a particular issue or floating an idea because they come at a "prime time" spot during the day, straight after questions or statements.

  68. Overseas voters

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown is now introducing his Overseas Voters (15 Year Rule) Bill.

    The bill would allow British citizens resident overseas for more than 15 years to vote in UK Parliamentary elections and referendums.

    At present, British citizens qualify as overseas voters only if they've been resident in the UK in the previous 15 years. Mr Clifton-Brown says he wants to remove this "arbitrary" qualifying period so that all British citizens could qualify as overseas voters.

  69. Points of order

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Sir Gerald Kaufman raises a point of order asking for answers to written questions to be published in Hansard - the official verbatim record of debates in parliament - once again.

    The service has now moved online but Sir Gerald says it "has long been [his] practice" to study questions in the printed Hansard, and removing them has deprived him and UK citizens of their usual routine and means Hansard is no longer a complete record.

    Speaker John Bercow says the House of Commons has already decided upon this matter. Hard copies of written questions and answers can be obtained from the Parliament voting office.

  70. Post update

    @JWoodcockMP

    Labour MP John Woodcock ‏tweets: Asked foreign sec to admit govt has no allies in EU bid for fuel discount for rural motorists. He protests (too much) he does have friends.

  71. Topical questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now putting quick fire topical questions to Foreign Office Ministers. MPs can ask supplementary questions on any subject relating to the department's responsibilities.

  72. Dano judgement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Nic Dakin calls on the government to use the recent Dano judgement in Germany to show that the EU member states have sufficient leeway to ensure "migrants come to the UK to work, not to claim [benefits]" without jeopardising the UK's membership of the EU.

    Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond agrees with Mr Dakin. "Sometimes in this country we assume the EU requires us to do things that it doesn't," he says.

    The Dano judgement shows there is more flexibility than is assumed to work with the existing EU powers, he adds.

  73. Russian economy

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to a question from shadow foreign office minister Pat McFadden, David Lidington says that the impact of sanctions against Russia coupled with the decline in oil prices is "catastrophic" for the Russian economy.

    The Europe minister says that he hopes sanctions will help push the the "Russian leadership" to accept that it is in the interest of the Russian people to implement the Minsk agreement in full, and return control of Ukraine's borders to Kiev.

  74. Negotiation needed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Michael Connarty accuses the government of "doing nothing" about recognising Palestine as a state after the House of Commons had voted to recognise it alongside Israel in October. What does it take to make the government "do the right thing", he asks.

    Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood says the government shares Parliament's commitment to recognising Palestine but contests what "the right thing" to do is. The government only have one chance to play "this card" recognising the Palestinian state he says, and the government should focus on getting the opposing sides back to the negotiating table.

  75. UK condemnation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Sir Gerald Kaufman urges the government to pressure Israel to stop its "inhumane" policy of demolishing houses of Palestinian offenders to punish the families of those who commit crimes against the Israeli state.

    Philip Hammond says the government does not approve of the Israeli government's "collective punishment" strategy and assures Sir Gerald the government "robustly oppose" it at every opportunity.

  76. EU negotiations

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    During a series of exchanges, shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander presses Phillip Hammond for detail on what powers the government is seeking to repatriate from the EU and asks what the government's estimate is of the economic benefit of EU membership . "Even a little ankle will do," he says.

    Mr Hammond says the government do not want to "run around" with a list of specific repatriations; it's far more important to establish the principle of subsidiary and how it will be effectively overseen, he says.

    On the perks of membership, Mr Hammond says the government have always maintained that the UK benefits "enormously" from access to the single market in Europe. The government wants the UK to remain part of the EU, he says.

  77. Showing flesh

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to a question from former foreign secretary Sir Malcolm Rifkind - who advises him not to give away the UK's objectives before negotiations with the EU begin - Philip Hammond tells MPs the government's approach is "a little ankle but not too much."

  78. Post update

    ‏@Maria_MillerMP

    Conservative MP Maria Miller tweets: EU should not be political union but trading partnership-need to ensure trade is front and fore when renegotiating terms of EU membership

  79. Foreign secretary at despatch box

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Philip Hammond
    Image caption: Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond fields questions from MPs
  80. EU reform

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to a series of questions on EU reform Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond tells MPs that he has spoken to representatives from 10 member states and "more and more leaders across Europe agree the EU needs to change".

    He highlights the June European Council meeting - where it was agreed reform of the EU was necessary - to MPs.

  81. Post update

    @ayestotheright

    PoliticsHome's Tony Grew ‏tweets: First @foreignoffice Q is about #Colombia. Minister @HugoSwire invites MPs to come and meet the country's ambassador with him

  82. Colombian struggle

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Gerry Sutcliffe kicks off business in the House of Commons, urging the government to push for a bi-lateral ceasefire between the Colombian government and Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Farc), to aid peace talks.

    Foreign Affairs Minister Hugo Swire says ceasefire with Farc is the "big prize". He invites Mr Sutcliffe to join him at his next meeting with the Colombian ambassador.

  83. Emergency debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hong Kong
    Image caption: Demonstrations over the election of Hong Kong's chief executive in 2017 have taken place for two months. Today, the Commons will hold an emergency debate after the Chinese Embassy denied the Foreign Affairs Committee visas for a trip to Hong Kong.
  84. Questions to Philip Hammond and team

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    But before all that, business in the Commons begins at 11.30 GMT with questions to Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and his ministerial teams, where debate is expected to focus on events in Palestine, scope for reform of the EU and a nuclear deal with Iran.

  85. Adjournment debate on corruption

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The day ends with an adjournment debate on government policy on tackling corruption, led by led by Conservative backbencher Stephen Barclay, who says the new government strategy due to be published soon provides a chance for Parliament to look at way City handles corruption - and the revenue from corruption abroad which he says is finding its way into City financial institutions.

    The new anti-corruption minister, Matt Hancock, is expected to reply.

  86. Citizens voting

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There is a ten minute rule motion from Conservative MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown, at around 12.30 GMT to remove the "arbitrary" 15-year cut-off date for British citizens to qualify as overseas voters in UK elections.

    Mr Clifton-Brown says he wants all British citizens to be allowed to vote in elections regardless of when they were last resident in the UK.

  87. Terror Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The main legislation today is the second reading of the newly published Counter Terrorism and Security Bill.

    This is a seven-part measure which includes:

    • Counter-radicalisation measures - requirements that schools, colleges and probation providers help prevent people being radicalised
    • Changes to TPIMs - Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures - to allow the authorities to force suspects to move to another part of the country
    • Raising the burden of proof for imposing TPIMs from "reasonable belief" to "balance of probabilities"
    • Greater powers to disrupt people heading abroad to fight - including cancelling passports at the border for up to 30 days
    • Statutory temporary exclusion orders to control return to the UK of British citizens suspected of terrorist activity
    • Tighter aviation security - requiring airlines to provide passenger data more quickly and effectively
    • Banning insurance companies from covering ransoms
    • Forcing firms to hand details to police identifying who was using a computer or mobile phone at a given time.

    The second reading debate is the first time a bill itself is debated, and discussions will focus around the principles of the bill rather than the details of individual clauses.

    This debate will give us a good idea of the scale of problems the bill may face at later stages - and MPs will be seeing a lot of it in the near future - because detailed consideration will be via three days in committee of the whole House on Tuesday 9, Monday 15 and Tuesday 16 December.

  88. Good morning

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to today's rolling coverage of the day's events in Parliament as they happen.

    An extended day in the House of Commons is due to kick off at 11:30 GMT.

    MPs are likely to sit until around 22.30 GMT, after an emergency debate on the Chinese Embassy's decision to deny the Foreign Affairs Committee visas for its planned fact-finding trip to Hong Kong was agreed in the Commons yesterday.

    The committee is examining relations between the UK and its former colony, where pro-democracy activists have been protesting since September.

    Sir Richard Ottaway, the committee's chairman, has accused the Chinese authorities of acting in an "overtly confrontational manner".