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Summary

  1. MPs met at 14.30 GMT for defence questions; followed by an urgent question at 15.30 GMT on the situation in Nigeria.
  2. The day's main business kicked off with consideration at committee, report stage and third reading of the Stamp Duty Land Tax Bill.
  3. MPs then considered Lords' amendments to the Consumer Rights Bill.
  4. The adjournment debate was on Corby fire services.
  5. The House of Lords sat at 14.30 GMT for oral questions.
  6. Peers then examined the Pension Schemes Bill in a committee of the whole House.
  7. The short debate looked at encouraging elderly people to prepare living wills and powers of attorney.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight from the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And that's the end of today's business in the Commons.

    MPs return at 11.30 GMT on Tuesday for debates on the Charter for Budget Responsibility, which sets out the government's approach to fiscal policy, and consideration of Lords amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill.

    Do join us then.

  2. Minister's response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Penny Mordaunt, responding to Andy Sawford says: "It is clear that the proposal is not to reduce cover" but to improve the response in rural areas.

    Mr Sawford says the local authority plans to cut one fire engine in Corby and that means a cut in services.

    "There are operational reasons why this is being put forward," Ms Mordaunt insists.

  3. Deputy speaker intervenes

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The deputy speaker interrupts the Conservative MP for Wellingborough, Peter Bone, to point out that the debate is again going a little wide of the subject.

    For the second time this evening, she urges a return to "the central proposition here".

    An adjournment debate should be used by an MP to put points to a minister, rather than a debate between two backbench MPs, she says.

  4. Corby fire service cuts

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There are 48 firefighters employed in four watches at Corby's Phoenix Parkway fire station.

    Force bosses want to cut that number to 36.

    If the cuts are given the green light, they will come into force in April 2015.

  5. Constituents' condemnation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andy Sawford quotes many of his constituents who have condemned plans to cut fire services in Corby.

    He argues that cuts are falling on Corby only, with other nearby areas not affected in the same way.

    However, many nearby rural areas rely on Corby's fire services, he adds.

    Andy Sawford
  6. End of Lords business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    And with that the House of Lords adjourns.

    Peers will return tomorrow at 14.30 GMT when the main business will be the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

  7. Government response

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Health Minister Earl Howe announces that the Ministry of Justice plans to run a campaign to raise awareness of the need to plan for the future and "encourage the public to think about what would happen in the event of their death or if they lost their capacity".

    Earl Howe points out that the government has already established a power of attorney digital tool, to make it easier to prepare a lasting power of attorney document.

    The government supports the idea that "all citizens should be cared for and treated in a matter they would choose in a time when they may not be able to make decisions for themselves", he tells peers.

    But the government's policy is to seek to ensure people are aware of their rights under law but it is up to the individual to make what he describes as "an intensely personal decision".

    Earl Howe
    Image caption: Earl Howe sets out the government's position on living wills and lasting power of attorney
  8. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The final business of the day begins: an adjournment debate led by the Labour MP for Corby, Andy Sawford.

    He is using the debate to raise his concerns about local authority cuts to fire services in his constituency.

  9. 'Out of order'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Deputy Speaker Dawn Primarolo warns Kevan Jones that he is straying from the topic of the debate.

    "Members may be entertained by your contribution but it is my job to keep you in order, and you are currently out of order," she tells the Labour MP.

    Dawn Primarolo
  10. Lords 'logjam'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Kevan Jones says there is a "logjam" in the House of Lords, as the House of Commons has sent so much legislation for it to consider in detail.

    "We are going to have a pretty thin February and March waiting for bills to come back," he adds, in a speech criticising the way in which the government has managed parliamentary business.

  11. Paramount importance

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Joffe, who has been diagnosed with the early stages of Alzheimer's, says that the importance of recording people's wishes for the end of their life is "paramount".

    "Speedy and energetic" government leadership is needed to bring the UK into line with the USA, he says, where living wills are "positively common" and are even used by Barack and Michelle Obama.

  12. 'Should plan for our deaths'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Baroness Flather argues: "Like everything in our lives that we should plan for our deaths."

    She acknowledges that people are afraid of talking about death, and instead use euphuisms like "passed away".

    However, she says that there must be some way of finding out what a person's wishes are ahead of a deterioration in their health.

  13. Extension motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons finishes its deliberations on the Consumer Rights Bill and appoint a committee to provide the House of Lords with a reason for disagreeing with its amendment.

    MPs are now considering a motion to extend the period of the bill's consideration by 67 days until 30 March 2015.

    This means that peers can potentially amend the bill again and return it to the Commons without it running out of parliamentary time.

  14. Living wills debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Living wills have caused controversy because they assume that the wishes of the person would be the same when they become incompetent as when they make the will.

    There is some evidence that it is much harder to anticipate one's state of mind when dying or when receiving significant medical treatment than had been thought, and equally hard, if not impossible, to anticipate what one's state of mind - if any - will be when one is in a coma.

    However a survey reported in the British Medical Journal in June 2000 found that although elderly inpatients were confused by the term "living will", most would welcome the chance to discuss issues about facing the end of life, and many would want to limit their health care if they were terminally ill.

  15. @SharonHodgsonMP

    Labour MP Sharon Hodgson tweets: Govt has overturned amendment to #putfansfirst. Not over yet, as goes back to Lords where a cross-party of Peers are ready to take up mantle

  16. Saving future pain

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Baroness Bakewell argues that more needs to be done to encourage elderly people, including those with early stage dementia, to prepare living wills and powers of attorney in anticipation of serious illness or degenerative disease.

    Living wills set out a patient's wishes regarding health care and how they want to be treated if they become seriously ill and unable to make or communicate their own choices.

    Not facing up to legal matters as early as possible will lead to more pain for families, the Labour peer argues.

    Baroness Bakewell
  17. Ping pong

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Consumer Rights Bill has passed all stages in both the Commons and the Lords and is now in a process known as parliamentary "ping pong".

    Both Houses must agree on the final form of the bill before it can proceed to royal assent and become law.

    When the bill returns to the Lords, peers may try to reinstate the amendment that MPs have rejected today or they may choose to accept the will of the Commons.

  18. More on the Consumer Rights Bill

    The Consumer Rights Bill strengthens powers to investigate breaches of consumer law and would allow trading standards officers to work across local authority boundaries.

    It sets out minimum quality rights for consumers in sales of goods and service contracts.

    The current regime has been criticised for being too complex and not keeping up with technological change.

    At present, people buying digital goods do not have the same protection as those buying tangible products.

  19. Committee stage completed

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Pensions Bill completes its committee stage.

    Peers now move to the last of today's business - a short debate led by Labour's Joan Bakewell, on the steps being taken to encourage elderly people to prepare living wills and powers of attorney.

  20. Cap needed

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Work and Pensions spokesman Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth says the cap on payments is in place because the Pension Protection Fund is underfunded.

    Any increase to the compensation cap needs to be paid for, he argues - which would either lead to the reduction of the amounts paid to those in the scheme or an increased levy paid by those who sign up to the scheme.

    Lord Balfe withdraws his amendment.

  21. More Lords amendments

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons now moves on to consider other Lords amendments to the bill.

    The government is in a more conciliatory mood about many of these amendments, which minister Jo Swinson says "improve" the bill.

  22. Lords amendment rejected

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs vote to back the government and overturn the Lords amendment by 290 votes to 203 - a majority of 87.

  23. Vote on Lords amendment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now voting on whether to support or reject the Lords amendment on secondary ticketing platforms.

  24. Pension protection fund

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Balfe is tabling an amendment calling for a review on limitations that can be paid out to people in a pension protection fund.

    The cap on payments that can be taken out of the fund - set up to protect people from losing their pensions if the company providing their pension went insolvent - limits the amount those in the fund can draw out if they were to use the more flexible pension schemes established by the bill, Lord Balfe argues.

    The cap was put in place to stop company directors from abusing the fund by transferring their own pension liability to the pension protection fund, by making them unable to draw out the large funds they would otherwise be entitled to.

  25. Amendment rejected

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs vote to reject an amendment which supported aspects of changes made to the bill in the Lords, by 289 votes to 204 - a government majority of 85.

  26. 'Clear the lobbies!'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons divides to vote on an amendment to the Consumer Rights Bill which would place new requirements on secondary ticketing websites.

    The changes were originally introduced during the bill's passage through the House of Lords, and the government opposes them.

    However, a number of MPs from all sides have spoken in support of the amendment as a way of stopping organised ticket touts buying large numbers of tickets and reselling them at an inflated price, and Labour MP Sharon Hodgson and Conservative MP Mike Weatherley have introduced their own amendment.

    MPs will vote shortly on whether to accept or reject the original Lords amendment.

  27. Cancellation risk

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business, Innovation and Skills Minister Jo Swinson is summing up for the government and opposing the Lords amendment on secondary ticketing platforms.

    She argues that ticketing websites now offer more protection for consumers and have measures in place to detect fraud.

    She says that requiring sites to give the name of the seller and the ticket number is intended to allow an event organiser to cancel tickets if they suspect someone is reselling them.

    The amendment could mean "the fan with the spare ticket" risks having "all their tickets cancelled" if they cannot attend an event and wish to resell a ticket, she argues.

    Jo Swinson
  28. Pre-existing powers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bourne of Aberstwyth argues that this amendment is unnecessary as the government already has powers to cap charges on the new flexi-access funds if necessary

    Together with the FCA, who also have product intervention powers which would allow them to cap charges on flexi-access funds, all institutions that can offer such funds are covered, Lord Bourne says.

    Labour withdraw their amendment.

  29. Labour backing for amendment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow business, innovation and skills minister Stella Creasy is speaking in support of the amendment made by peers to the Consumer Rights Bill.

    The amendment says: "Secondary ticketing operators must, on the website on which tickets are offered for sale or transfer, provide information concerning the sellers of tickets so that sellers may be easily identified."

    Ms Creasy argues that, in "a country which is now drowning in personal debt", it is important to ensure that people do not get "ripped off".

    Stella Creasy
  30. "Rip off charges"

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour Work and Pensions Spokesman Lord Bradley is tabling a motion to place a cap on charges that may be imposed on members of flexi-access drawdown funds.

    Quoting from a report by consumers' association Which?, Lord Bradley warns that pensioners may be subject to "rip-off charges" of 1% or 2%, plus an administration fee of £250 per year, to access their pensions under new schemes without a cap.

  31. Committee stage

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    At Committee stage, peers go through a bill line by line and deal with the clauses of a bill one by one. In Committees of the whole House - like this - any peer may put down and move an amendment .

    Amendments at this stage can serve a variety of purposes, and tend not to be pushed to a vote.

    If a bill is highly contentious in party political terms, many amendments will be pegs to give publicity to government and opposition viewpoints.

    So-called '"probing amendments" are used to clarify provisions in the bill and to give government ministers a chance to outline the government's thinking behind them.

    Following committee stage the bill moves to report, where the real voting action takes place as peers tend push for a vote to test the opinion of the house.

  32. FCA powers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Newby argues that the FCA already has appropriate powers to protect pensioners who have not taken up the offer of guidance, and is committed to protecting consumer in financial markets and monitoring the pensions market.

    He tells peers that the FCA has powers to intervene if products have been mis-sold that are inappropriate for consumers' product intervention powers, which allow them to ban or impose restrictions on certain products.

    Following these assurances, the amendment is withdrawn.

  33. Unguided pensioners amendment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are now debating an amendment to require the Financial Conduct Authority to protect pensioners who have not taken government guidance on key risks and benefits.

  34. Amendment backed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Mike Weatherley, who is co-chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Secondary Ticketing, backs the Lords amendment to place requirements on websites reselling event tickets.

    "Quite clearly, the free market has fallen down," he argues, rejecting the position of his fellow Conservative MP, Philip Davis.

    Mr Weatherley is also a former intellectual property adviser to Prime Minister David Cameron.

  35. 'Choice' of the House

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Nic Dakin claims the House has a choice between being "on the side of the consumer, or on the side of the touts" when it votes on whether to accept or reject the Lords amendment on secondary ticket sales.

  36. 'Legitimate market'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Philip Davies, a member of the Culture, Media and Sport Committee, is speaking against the Lords amendment on secondary ticketing.

    He says the Commons committee produced a "unanimous report" which concluded that "the secondary ticketing market was a legitimate market and worked in the interests of consumers".

    He accuses Labour MP Sharon Hodgson of talking "absolute cobblers", adding: "She's a socialist, and of course she wants to stop the free market."

  37. Protecting consumers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister Lord Newby says the government and regulators - such as the FCA - will, as a matter of course, keep an eye on the changing market to see that it is operating well and ensure that users of the market are protected.

  38. Secondary ticketing platforms

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Among peers' amendments to the Consumer Rights Bill is one which places requirements on secondary ticketing platforms.

    The amendment would require websites offering event tickets for resale or transfer to provide the name and details of the seller.

    Labour MP Sharon Hodgson argues that the change is necessary to stop ticket touts exploiting the resale market by buying a large number of "primary tickets" and reselling them at an inflated rate.

    She claims is it important to bring "transparency" to the market.

  39. Budget reforms

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Under proposals announced in last year's budget, millions of people reaching retirement age will be able to spend their pension pot in any way they want.

    It will remove the requirement on many people with defined contribution pensions to buy an annuity, a financial product that guarantees an income for the rest of your life.

    The government says that the overhaul will give retirees more flexibility to do what they want with their pension savings, but Labour says this policy has the potential to be "reckless".

    The new proposed rules will come in from April 2015, but some of the current rules were relaxed in March 2014.

  40. Impact report

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now return to the Pensions Bill.

    Crossbench peer Baroness Greengross tables an amendment requiring the Treasury to make an annual report on the lives of people who take up the government's offer of "flexible drawdown" on their pensions

    Baroness Greengross argues that the new freedoms could lead to more people living in "pension poverty". In order to understand the new risks that accompany the new options people need to be better informed, she says.

  41. Consumer Rights Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    With the support of the opposition, the Stamp Duty Land Tax Bill sails through its third reading.

    MPs are now considering Lords' amendments to the Consumer Rights Bill.

    The bill consolidates the law covering contracts for goods, services and digital content.

    It also introduces new ways for consumers and small businesses to challenge anti-competitive behaviour.

  42. Labour support

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Shabana Mahmood says her party is "happy to support" changes to stamp duty.

    Shabana Mahmood
  43. Bill stages

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are considering all remaining stages of the Stamp Duty Land Tax today.

    Committee stage of the bill has concluded and there is no debate for report stage, so the final, third reading debate begins.

    At committee stage, MPs consider a bill in detail and have the opportunity to table amendments.

    Third reading gives MPs a final chance to debate the bill in its final, amended form.

  44. Military assistance

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Tory Cabinet minister and Conservative peer Lord Tebbit asks if the UK has considered providing any military assistance to Nigeria's "incompetent army" in defeating Boko Haram.

    He argues that Boko Haram's activities are a "continuation" of the 1980s Nigerian civil war, exacerbated by the corruption of the Nigerian government and the "vicious spirit" of Islamic extremism.

    Baroness Anelay says the UK will not send its own troops to Nigeria but that the UK is helping to train the Nigerian army.

  45. Behaviour change?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister David Gauke responds to a question from fellow Conservative John Redwood on whether the stamp duty changes will cause "behavioural changes".

    Mr Redwood also asks if the changes would be the "straw that breaks the camel's back" and puts off wealthy people from overseas investing in UK property.

    Mr Gauke concedes that "some people may be discouraged from entering into a transaction, particularly at the higher level".

    However, he adds that he can "think of greater threats to the attractiveness of the UK", alluding to the proposals from Labour for a "mansion tax".

  46. Taliban attacks

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Hussain argues that Boko Haram's activities are just as brutal as the Taliban's, who attacked school children in Pakistan in December, and asks what is being done to help Pakistan.

    Baroness Anelay says her comments must be restricted to the country mentioned in the urgent question.

  47. As helpful as possible

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Anelay of St Johns says the UK is talking to Nigerian authorities to be as helpful as possible, specifically in terms of providing surveillance and intelligence expertise.

  48. Labour response

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Responding to the statement Labour Foreign Affairs spokeswoman Baroness Morgan of Ely says despite the attacks in Paris last week the world must not "lose sight of terrorist attacks taking place elsewhere".

    She argues that bilateral action is needed to end the terrorist attacks in Nigeria and asks for details on what is being done to coordinate international action against Boko Haram.

  49. Repeated statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Important government statements made in the House of Commons will sometimes be repeated in the Lords at an appropriate time to fit in with the main business.

    Once the statement has been repeated peers have an opportunity to quiz a government minister on the content of the statement, as in the House of Commons.

  50. Boko Haram statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anely of St Johns is now repeating a statement on terrorist attacks by Boko Haram in Nigeria, made in the House of Commons in response to an urgent question from Sarah Teather.

  51. Unnecessary amendment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Responding to the comments Lord Newby says the Treasury already publish regular information on tax receipts that will reflect any impact on the exchequers and will be kept under continued review.

  52. Territorial extent of the bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The changes in stamp duty - and the provisions of the bill - apply to residential property transactions throughout the UK.

    However, powers in this area in Scotland are now devolved and from 1 April 2015, stamp duty in Scotland is being replaced by the Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT).

    Scottish Finance Secretary John Swinney announced the change in October.

    As shadow Treasury minister Shabana Mahmood points out in the Commons, the new Scottish tax will apply to both residential and commercial transactions.

  53. Unknown impact

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lending his support to the amendment, Labour's Lord Hutton of Furness argues there is no way of knowing what impact these pension reforms, which he describes as the "biggest shake up of our pensions system for 100 years", will have.

    It is "incumbent on the government" to have a plan for reporting the impact of these changes back to parliament, he says.

  54. New stamp duty rates

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister David Gauke, opening the debate, says the government has replaced the "distorted old system" of stamp duty with a "fairer" one.

    In his Autumn Statement in December, the chancellor claimed stamp duty will be cut for 98% of homebuyers.

    Under the new rules, no tax will be paid on the first £125,000 of a property, followed by 2% on the portion up to £250,000, 5% on the portion between £250,000 and £925,000, 10% on the next gradation up to £1.5m and 12% on everything over that.

  55. Tax avoidance risks

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour spokesman Lord Bradley argues that the reforms may lead to opportunities for tax and national insurance contributions avoidance.

    Labour has tabled an amendment to the bill that will require the Chancellor to publish a report on the pensions reforms' impact on government revenues within two years of their implementation.

  56. Stamp Duty Land Tax Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons now moves on to the main business of the day, beginning with the committee stage of the Stamp Duty Land Tax Bill.

    The bill implements a new table of rates and bands applying to residential property transactions.

    Chancellor George Osborne announced changes to Stamp Duty Land Tax in the Autumn Statement.

  57. Amendment withdrawn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bradley withdraws his amendment but indicates the subject will be returned to at a later stage.

  58. Training is the key

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister Lord Newby argues that the training being given to public bodies giving pensions guidance is already adequate to deliver "a quality guidance service" as the pension system evolves in response to the Pensions Schemes Bill.

    Lord Newby
  59. Post update

    @GregHands

    Tory MP Greg Hands tweets: In the Commons Chamber for an Urgent Question on Nigeria. Horrible terror from Boko Haram, causing a tragedy for the country.

  60. 'Solidarity across continents'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Foreign Office minister John Spellar calls for "solidarity across continents" following the weekend's demonstrations in solidarity with the victims of the attacks in Paris.

    He highlights recent attacks in Pakistan as well as in Nigeria.

  61. Displaced people

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sarah Teather says the insurgency has displaced thousands of people, who have fled to neighbouring countries that are "already resource-poor".

    Sarah Teather
  62. 'Weak and vulnerable' targeted

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hugo Swire says Boko Haram "deliberately targets the weak and vulnerable".

    He adds that the Islamist militants have probably "killed more Muslims than Christians".

    He also calls for free and fair elections in Nigeria.

    Nigerian's president, Goodluck Jonathan, faces re-election next month.

  63. Nigeria violence

    Ignatius Kaigama, the Catholic Archbishop of Jos, in central Nigeria, has accused the West of ignoring the threat of the militant Islamist group, Boko Haram.

    He said the international community had to show the same spirit and resolve it had done after the attacks in France; and that the world had to show more determination to halt the group's advance in Nigeria.

    Children stand near the scene of an explosion in a mobile phone market in Potiskum, Nigeria, on 12 January 2015
    Image caption: Potiskum in the north-east was among the towns hit by explosions
  64. Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Foreign Office Minister Hugo Swire is answering an urgent question on the situation in Nigeria, tabled by Lib Dem MP Sarah Teather.

    Over the weekend, 23 people were killed by three female suicide bombers, one reported to be 10 years old.

    The attack is the latest in a wave of violence in a five-year insurgency which killed more than 5,000 people, according to the Washington-based Council on Foreign Relations.

  65. Guidance review

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now debate a Labour amendment calling for an annual review of the guidance given to pensioners about their retirement options.

    Labour peer Lord Bradley argues that the guidance will be critical for the decisions people make about how they plan their retirement income, and an annual review will help avoid future mis-selling scandals as pension products change over time.

  66. Boko Haram

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Richard Fuller asks what the government will do to combat the actions of Boko Haram in Nigeria.

    The Islamist militant group controls about 20,000 square miles of territory in the Nigeria.

    Nigerian president Goodluck Jonathan has declared an emergency in three states.

    Recent violence in the country is the subject of an urgent question, which follows shortly.

  67. Post update

    @bealejonathan

    Jonathan Beale

    Defence correspondent, BBC News

    tweets: Minister confirms more difficulties with Army recruitment - regulars as well as reserves. Army regular recruitment nos 3000 below target

  68. Pensions Scheme Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now turn to the committee stage scrutiny of the Pensions Schemes Bill.

    Before debate can even get underway, peers agree to a series of government amendments to allow the guidance guarantee - the free, impartial guidance to people about to retire, on what to do with the money in their defined contribution schemes - to be extended to survivors of pension scheme members.

  69. Reviewing security

    Prime Minister David Cameron and security chiefs have reviewed the risk of a Paris-style attack in the UK.

    There will steps taken to heighten security to ensure activists cannot bring weapons into the UK.

    Armed police officers stand on duty outside the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, central London November 24, 2014
    Image caption: There are fears that Britain could be the victim of an extremist attack like that seen in France

    The UK terror threat level remains unchanged at "severe", meaning an attack is highly likely.

  70. Islamic State link to Paris?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Following questions on Islamic State in Iraq, shadow defence secretary Vernon Coaker says that one of the attackers involved in the violence in Paris said he was loyal to the group.

    A video has emerged appearing to show Amedy Coulibaly, who carried out an attack on a kosher supermarket in Paris, pledging allegiance to Islamic State.

    Michael Fallon says the UK's security situation is constantly under review in the wake of the Paris attacks.

    Security chiefs have agreed that elements of the Paris attacks should be considered when planning future training exercises for the police and armed forces.

  71. Supporting village life

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Roberts of Llandudno argues that villages of 1,000 residents or fewer are becoming suburbs of other towns, and that new plans are needed needed encourage "liveliness and buoyancy" to allow villages to support themselves economically.

    Communities Minister Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon says the government is investing great deal into local villages, including the rural villages support fund, and encourages banks to provide access to financial services in hard to reach rural areas.

  72. Islamic State

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Secretary Michael Fallon says the UK will provide "anti-IED equipment" to Iraqi forces to help combat Islamic State.

    Michael Fallon
  73. Minimum alcohol pricing

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Responding to a question from Baroness Hollins, Earl Howe confirms that the government is still looking at minimum unit pricing for alcohol, but is waiting for research from Public Health England before making a final decision.

  74. Post update

    @CNDuk

    CND tweets: At Defence Questions @jeremycorbyn asks @DefenceHQ to publish info on the impact of a Trident warhead following #HINW14Vienna conference

  75. Alcohol addiction

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Avebury asks what Public Health England's (PHE) plans are for combating alcohol addiction, pointing out that only 10% of what is spent on combating drug addiction is spent on alcohol addiction.

    Health Minister Earl Howe says PHE is implementing a programme to support local and national health agencies as combating alcoholism is one of PHEs seven key priorities.

  76. Post update

    @LibDemLords

    Lib Dem Lords tweets: "One of the best commemorations of WW1 was Blood, Sweat, Lands. Artistic endeavour bringing people together" says @jbonham_carter #LordsQs

  77. Waterloo anniversary

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Forsyth of Drumlean asks what is being done to to help commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo.

    Following last week's events we must never forget the sacrifices made by British people over the last 200 years in the defence of "peace, prosperity, democracy and freedom in Europe", he says.

    Culture Media and Sports Minister Lord Gardiner of Kimble says that the government has announced £1m of funding to support activities to commemorate the anniversary.

  78. Consequences of nuclear war

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Jeremy Corbyn calls for the publication of government research on the global atmospheric consequences of nuclear war.

    Mr Corbyn says international research has highlighted "frightening" information about the consequences for the global climate of "any nuclear explosion".

    Defence Minister Mark Francois says he thinks Mr Corbyn is referring to declassified Home Office papers.

    The minister adds that he believes "the nuclear deterrent contributes materially to our national security".

  79. Telematics explained

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Howarth of Newport asks Baroness Kramer to explain what "telematics" are to the less technologically advanced peers.

    Baroness Kramer explains that "telematics" is the use of a "gizmo in the car" that communicates driving behaviours to insurance companies in order to monitor young drivers.

    Insurance companies currently offer discounts for young drivers willing to allow telematics into their cars.

  80. 'Resolute Support' in Afghanistan

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Sir Hugh Bayley urges commitment to Nato's Resolute Support operation in Afghanistan.

    The Nato operation was launched on 1 January and aims to provide training and backing to Afghan security forces.

    Sir Hugh Bayley
  81. Young drivers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Jordan opens the oral question session in the House of Lords, asking what is being done to address the incidence of vehicle accidents involving young drivers.

    Transport Minister Baroness Kramer says the government is focussing on technological solutions including telematics - the use of in-car sensors - to help reduce the "disproportionate" number of car accidents involving young drivers.

  82. Wolf in peer's clothing

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Wolf of Dulwich is being introduced to the House of Lords, where she will sit on the Crossbenches.

    Alison Wolf is the Sir Roy Griffiths Professor of Public Sector Management at Kings College London and an economist specialising in the relationship between education and the labour market.

    Baroness Woolf of Dulwich
    Image caption: Alison Woolf being introduced into the House of Lords as Baroness Wolf of Dulwich
  83. Question session begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence questions begin with a question from Conservative MP Andrew Stevenson, asking what is being done to increase the number of cadet units in schools.

    Defence Minister Anna Soubry says the government is "on track" to establish 100 new cadet units.

  84. Defence questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The day in the House of Commons will begin in a few minutes' time, with questions to Defence Secretary Michael Fallon and his team of ministers.

    Topics include increasing the number of cadet units in schools, assisting Iraqi forces in countering Islamic State, and recent trends in recruitment to the Army Reserve.

  85. New peer

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    But before all that peers welcome another member to the House of Lords.

    Economist Alison Wolf, who led the 2011 Wolf Review of Vocational Education , will join the non-party political peers on crossbenches under the title Baroness Wolf of Dulwich.

  86. Oral questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers oral questions session will begin at 14.40 GMT today. Peers will ask questions on:

    • addressing vehicle accidents involving young drivers
    • the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo
    • Public Health England's plans for combating alcohol addiction, and
    • safeguarding village life.
  87. Living Wills debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    This will be followed by a short dinner break debate led by Labour's Joan Bakewell, on the steps being taken to encourage elderly people to prepare living wills and powers of attorney.

    Living wills set out a patient's wishes regarding health care and how they want to be treated if they become seriously ill and unable to make or communicate their own choices.

    These documents have proved very controversial in recent years so expect a lively debate.

  88. Lords' business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Over in the House of Lords today's main business is the second committee stage day on the Pension Schemes Bill - which implements the government's plans to remove the requirement on many people with defined contribution pensions to buy an annuity.

    The measure was announced in last year's Budget.

    Today debate will focus on the guidance guarantee - the free, impartial guidance the Chancellor, George Osborne, promised to people about to retire, on what to do with the money in their defined contribution schemes.

  89. Day's main business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After that, MPs will then debate the remaining stages of the Stamp Duty Land Tax Bill. The bill, which had its second reading on 10 December, enacts the new thresholds for stamp duty on residential property transactions.

    The Commons will then decide whether to accept or reject Lords amendments to the Consumer Rights Bill.

    Finally, Labour MP Andy Sawford will lead an adjournment debate on fire services in his constituency of Corby.

  90. Welcome

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our live coverage of Monday in Westminster.

    The House of Commons will sit from 14:30 GMT, beginning the day with defence questions.

    This will be followed by an urgent question on the situation in Nigeria, tabled by Liberal Democrat MP Sarah Teather. It follows suicide attacks in the north-east of the country, including the bombing of a market on Sunday which claimed at least six lives.