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Summary

  1. David Cameron pledges a Conservative government would not cut funding-per-pupil in English schools
  2. But Labour accuses him of a real terms cut when inflation is taken into account
  3. Ed Miliband hits back at Boots boss Stefano Pessina after his attack on the party on Sunday
  4. Leading universities criticise Labour plans to cut student tuition fees from £9,000 to £6,000
  5. There are 94 days to go until the General Election on 7 May
  6. Rolling coverage from the BBC's political team - from Today and Breakfast through to Newsnight and Today in Parliament
  7. Watch/listen to today's programmes by clicking on the 'Live Coverage' tab or the pick of the day by via 'Key Video' tab

Live Reporting

By Adam Donald, Angela Harrison and Tom Moseley

All times stated are UK

Get involved

Goodnight

That's all from the Politics Live team for tonight, at the end of a day which saw education policy at the heart of political debate. The Conservatives announced plans to turn more schools into academies and to "protect" schools spending in "flat cash" terms, although not against inflation. Labour and the Liberal Democrats said the plans represented a "real-terms cut" and that other areas of education spending would be squeezed.

We'll be back at 06:00, with the latest news and comment, including from the Today programme and BBC Breakfast. In the Commons, MPs will debate controversial proposals to allow the creation of babies using DNA from three people.

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's FT: "Greek finance minister unveils bid to end stand-off with creditors" (via @suttonnick) #bbcpapers

Tomorrow's Financial Times front page
Financial Times

Female voters

BBC Radio 4

Re-capping - more than a third of women are yet to decide who to vote for at the UK general election, a TNS poll for BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour suggested.

Of those surveyed, 35% said they did not know who to cast their ballot for - compared with 25% of men. The poll also found the NHS, living costs and the cost of caring for family were of greatest concern for women. Read the full story

here.

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's Metro front page: "Rail users 'are being treated like criminals'" (via @suttonnick) #tomorrowspaperstoday

Tomorrow's Metro
Metro

Business row

In tomorrow's Daily Mail and Daily Telegraph, a number of businessmen including former Marks & Spencer chairman Lord Rose - who is a Conservative peer - criticise the Labour leader and say he is trying to shut down debate. David Miliband had hit back at the Boots boss Stefano Pessina who had criticised Labour. On Twitter,

the Labour media team said: "Ridiculous Mail splash tonight. They have revealed a Tory peer is attacking Labour. Shock."

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's Independent: "Outcry after undercover film exposes brutality of halal industry" (via @suttonnick)

Tomorrow's Independent front page
The Independent

BBC Newsnight

@BBCNewsnight

tweets: Police mugshot database chief Mike Barton tells #newsnight he doesn't know how many of the people on there are convicted

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's Daily Mirror: "Save cash for fuel bills by eating packed lunch" (via @suttonnick) #tomorrowspaperstoday

Tomorrow's Mirror front page
Daily Mirror

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's Daily Express: "New pill can cure diabetes" (via @suttonnick) #tomorrowspaperstoday #bbcpapers

Tomorrow's Daily Express front page
Daily Express

Ian Katz, editor of BBC Newsnight

@iankatz1000

tweets: 18m mugshots in police facial recognition biometric database include hundreds of thousands of people not convicted of any crime #newsnight

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's Times: "Prince quits role as arms salesman to Middle East" (via @suttonnick) #tomorrowspaperstoday

Tomorrow's Times front page
The Times

Michael Savage, chief political correspondent for The Times

@michaelsavage

tweets: In tomorrow's Times - Charles Clarke says voters don't currently think Labour would do any better than coalition.

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's Guardian: "The locums on £1,760 a day" (via @suttonnick) #tomorrowspaperstoday #bbcpapers

Tomorrow's Guardian front page
The Guardian

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's Telegraph: "Business chiefs hit back at Miliband" (via @suttonnick) #tomorrowspaperstoday #bbcpapers

Tomorrow's Telegraph front page
Daily Telegraph

Education spending

BBC Newsnight

BBC Two, 22:30

The Liberal Democrat Business Secretary, Vince Cable, has criticised Conservative plans to protect education spending for five- to 16-year-olds. He told Newsnight "The Tory commitment is in cash terms, not in real terms, and there is another worry which are the 16-19 year olds. The FE (Further Education) colleges are under financial pressure like the other institutions and this would hit them very badly as they wouldn't be protected."

Stubbing out

Smokers in Bristol are being asked not to light up in two of the city's public squares, in what's believed to be the first scheme of its kind in the UK. The ban isn't in law and can't be enforced, but organisers hope that people will refrain from smoking if they're asked politely.

Education secretary

Conservative Home

At ConservativeHome,

Mark Wallace looks at "the many plates that Nicky Morgan must spin". He says the education secretary is beset with problems almost wholly inherited: "With a tough ministerial gig from the outset, a sometimes rebellious department, intervention from above and an election to fight, it's remarkable she's doing as well as she is."

Tomorrow's papers

@BBCNews

BBC News

UK

tweets: Tuesday's International NY Times: "On Ukraine front, rebels are upbeat" (via @suttonnick) #tomorrowspaperstoday

Tomorrow's International New York Times
New York Times

Bird flu

MP for Meon Valley George Hollingbery said the outbreak of bird flu was detected in the Hampshire village of Upham. He'd been told that any danger to the public was very low and the strain was a "mild one".

Tuition fees

The Guardian

The Guardian reports that Ed Miliband is delaying outlining Labour's tuition fee policy. He wants to cut fees in England to £6,000 a year, but the paper's political editor, Patrick Wintour, says he has "yet to find a way to fund the cut that satisfies the shadow chancellor Ed Balls".

BBC Newsbeat

@BBCNewsbeat

tweets: These 18 to 24-year-olds tell us what #GE2015 means to them... in one word
http://bbc.in/1D6HhHc

Newsbeat contributors
BBC

No 'snoopers' charter' revival

A cross-party group of peers has dropped a

second attempt to add the so-called "snoopers' charter" to the government's counter-terrorism bill. Lords King, Blair, Carlile and West wanted measures on communications data, rejected by the Lib Dems in 2012, to be included in the bill, saying they were vital tools for combating terrorism. But this evening they withdrew their amendment and it did not go to a vote.

Bird flu

The chief vet Nigel Gibbens says a "low severity" case of bird flu has been confirmed in chickens at a farm in Hampshire. "We are taking action to ensure that the disease does not spread or develop into a more severe form; we are investigating the possible sources of the outbreak," he said.

NUT on schools

Asked about Conservative plans to convert more schools to academies (semi-independent state-funded schools), Kevin Courtney, from the National Union of Teachers, said they were a "distraction" from the problems in England's schools. More and more teachers were leaving the profession he said, and "in just the last month, we've been told by councils that they're reaching a crisis point on places for children in schools".

Prison incident

Andy Martin

BBC Ireland correspondent

More than 40 prisoners have been involved in an incident at Northern Ireland's high security jail, reports the BBC's Ireland correspondent Andy Martin. It's understood prison officers left a wing which houses dissident republicans, after some inmates verbally threatened them over increased security measures. The prisoners are secure, but are not currently in the cells and nobody has been injured.

BBC Newsnight

BBC Two, 22:30

Tonight on

@BBCNewsnight: Evan Davis interviews Vince Cable, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, about university tuition fees; investment in education, the Labour Party's campaign, and more. Tune in to Newsnight at 22:30 on BBC Two to see, or catch up afterwards on BBC iPlayer.

Evan Davis and Vince Cable
GoV.UK

Labour fortunes

The Spectator

Ed Miliband
Associated Press

At The Spectator,

Sebastian Payne says although Labour are tied with the Conservatives in Lord Ashcroft's latest poll and roughly half of respondents think the policies of the last few years have been the wrong ones, Ed Miliband's party "is still not trusted to run the country". Why? "The top reason is that voters fear Labour might spend and borrow more than the country can afford, closely followed by the perception they haven't made clear what it would do to improve things."

Magna Carta

Half of young adults in the UK do not know what Magna Carta is, a

survey for ITV News suggests. While seven out of 10 people as a whole correctly indentified it as part of Britain's constitution, among 18- to 34-year-olds, this figure dropped to five out of 10.

The four surviving copies of the 1215 Magna Carta, one of the most important legal documents in history, have

recently been brought together to mark its 800th anniversary.

Magna Carta
EPA

Lord Ashcroft poll

The Tories and Labour are still running neck and neck, according to the latest poll by the Conservative peer Lord Ashcroft, although both were down a point on last week at 31%. The Liberal Democrats are up two percentage points to 8%, but still trail Ukip, who are on 15% and the Greens, with 9%. The SNP were up a point at 4% in the telephone poll, which involved 1,002 adults between 30 January and 1 February.

Consultant's campaign

Kate Granger
Kate Granger

A hospital consultant who is terminally-ill has been backed by more than 90 NHS organisations in her campaign to get NHS staff to

.

Education debate

Labour's shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt, speaking to Channel 4 News, described David Cameron's announcements today as "very familiar old-school Tory policy", and said the government had found "tax cuts for millionaires, but not investment to support teachers, schools, early years, sixth form colleges".

Schools minister Nick Gibb, a Conservative MP, said not guaranteeing spending rises with inflation in the next parliament was difficult, but "a competent government has to take difficult decisions to ensure our public finances are on a sure footing".

Patrick Wintour, political editor of The Guardian

@patrickwintour

tweets: For once Vince Cable gets on front foot over tuition fees with five questions Labour needs to answer | Vince Cable
http://gu.com/p/45e58/stw

Education debate

Vicki Young
BBC

David Cameron says a future Conservative government would protect England's schools budget in cash terms, but per pupil funding would not keep pace with inflation. The prime minister said the government would provide a further £7bn for extra places for rising numbers of pupils. But Labour said Tory claims to protect funding were "unravelling" and represented a "real-terms cut".

Watch BBC News chief political correspondent Vicki Young give her analysis of the debate

here.

Danny Shaw, BBC Home Affairs Correspondent

@DannyShawBBC

tweets: There were 38 murders & 106 rapes committed in 2013 by offenders on bail in Eng/Wales - FOI from @MoJGovUK Ministry of Justice.

Labour membership figures

The Labour Party has released figures which it says show party membership is at its highest since 2005. The party said it had 194,269 members, up from the 189,531 it

reported at the end of 2013. Labour says this makes it "the biggest political party in the country going into the general election". The Conservatives recently said they had 224,000 paying members - up 30% in a year - although this includes their £1-a-year "supporters".

Labour pamphlets
Getty Images

May2015, election website

@May2015NS

tweets: As Jan becomes Feb, polls are unchanged… LAB & CON exchanging leads (LAB in front more often).
http://may2015.com/

polls chart
May2015.com

James Landale

Deputy Political Editor, BBC News

England flag
BBC

The BBC's deputy political editor

James Landale takes a look at divisions within the Conservative Party on the question of so-called English votes for English laws: "The debate is getting more complicated and it could be about to get more bloody."

Female voters

The Guardian

Responding to an earlier TNS poll for Radio 4 Woman's Hour, which revealed that more than one third of women are yet to decide who they will vote for on 7 May,

Suzanne Moore in the Guardian says "for five years women have been in the frontline of cuts". She cautions: "The cost of ignoring women is huge for any political party. The actual cost of austerity has been paid for by women and children, often to devastating effect. Austerity, as it has been practiced, has been gendered."

Populus, polling organisation

@PopulusPolls

tweets: Latest Populus VI: Lab 34 (-1), Con 31 (-3), LD 8 (-2), UKIP 14 (-), Others 13 (+6). Tables here:
http://popu.lu/sVI020215