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Summary

  1. MPs began the day at 9.30am with questions to Energy and Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey.
  2. Following that, Leader of the House William Hague set out the upcoming business in the House of Commons.
  3. MPs took part in two backbench business debates: the first on building sustainable GP services, then on improving cancer outcomes.
  4. The day finished with an adjournment debate on beer duty.
  5. Peers met at 11.30 GMT and, after oral questions, debated the Pension Schemes Bill at third reading.
  6. Peers then turned to the Deregulation Bill for the second day of report stage scrutiny.
  7. There was also a short debate on improvement of maternity care and training of maternity staff.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That's the end of business in the Lords, and in Parliament, for today.

    Peers will sit tomorrow from 10:00 GMT to debate private members' bills, beginning with the International Development (Official Development Assistance Target) Bill.

  2. 'Tidying up exercise'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town introduces an amendment to allow the Council for Licensed Conveyancers to regulate for example, probate lawyers without them having to qualify and be regulated in conveyancing.

    She describes the amendment as a "tidying up exercise".

    Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town
  3. End of Commons business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And that brings an end to today's business in the House of Commons.

    MPs will be back at 14.30 GMT on Monday 9 February.

    Stay with us as peers continue their report stage scrutiny of the Deregulation Bill.

  4. Post update

    @agriffithsmp

    Conservative MP Andrew Griffiths tweets: .@almurray & I are united in our love of Great British beer! Best beer in the world! ‏

  5. Government wins the vote

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The government wins this division by 36 votes.

    Peers reject Baroness Meacher's amendment by 163 votes to 127.

  6. Thriving pubs

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Bringing her remarks to a close, Ms Patel argues cuts to beer duty and reduced restrictions on playing live music have allowed "British pub to thrive" under this government.

  7. In vino veritas

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative chair of the all party group on wine, Tim Loughton, intervenes to make the case for extra support for the wine industry, which he says accounts for 22% of sales in pubs.

    He offers Ms Patel a bottle of English wine if she includes wine in any "happy hour" deals the Treasury may be planning for beer.

    Tim Loughton
  8. Division on social work amendment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House divides on the amendment requiring Parliament to approve a change in the regulation of providers of social work services and requiring the government to produce a risk assessment.

  9. Economic case

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate, Exchequer Secretary Priti Patel notes that the brewing industry is a major part of the UK economy adding £22bn to the UK's GDP and supporting over 900,00 people in total including a "significant proportion" of young people.

    Priti Patel
  10. Social drinking

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrew Griffiths welcomes the scrapping of the beer duty escalator - which adds inflation plus 2% to the price - in the 2013 budget, but calls for greater support for the beer brewing industry.

    The way to support local communities is to support the beer industry as "it is beer that gets people into the pubs" he argues.

  11. 'No adequate case'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The amendment, introduced by crossbencher Baroness Meacher, is backed by Labour peers Baroness Donaghy and Baroness Jones of Whitchurch.

    Baroness Jones, a shadow education spokeswoman, claims the government "hasn't presented an adequate case" to say why changes are necessary.

    She adds that child abuse is happening "on a scale we cannot fully comprehend".

  12. 'Protecting our children'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbencher Baroness Howarth of Breckland is speaking in support of an amendment to a section of the bill concerning a reduction in regulation of providers of social work services.

    The amendment would require Parliament to approve a regulation change and require the government to produce a risk assessment.

    "If we are committed to truly protecting our children," she says, "we will take more time to evaluate whether this is the way forward."

    Baroness Howarth says she is concerned for "the nation's most vulnerable children".

  13. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Andrew Griffiths, the chair of the all-party beer group, is now leading the adjournment debate on the beer duty.

  14. Petition

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leicester East MP Keith Vaz is presenting a petition to from his constituents on the lack of appropriate parking around Shree Sanatan Mandir Hindu temple in Leicester.

  15. Cancer figures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Closing the debate, Conservative MP John Baron uses his final speech to make the case for yearly cancer figures broken down by CCG to be published, so that results can be compared "and save the lives we all wish for".

  16. More patients than ever

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Minister Jane Ellison responds to some of the claims made in today's debate.

    Most waiting times for cancer treatments are maintained she tells MPs, while the NHS is treating more cancer patients than ever and "survival rates are improving", she says.

    Drawing her remarks to a close she argues that the new NHS Cancer Task force is leading the way and "will make a real difference"; but agrees the health system must continue to be challenged, and thanks MPs for today's debate.

    Jane Ellison
  17. 'For the next Parliament'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Cabinet Office spokesman Lord Wallace of Saltaire says he recognises "popular local disillusion" in Bristol, but argues that the matter is a parliamentary one as well as a local one.

    "It will be for the next Parliament to consider," he declares, and urges withdrawal of the amendment.

    Baroness Janke agrees to withdraw but adds that she "does not believe it is something that will go away" and she will try to find another way "to take this forward".

  18. Bristol referendum

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Janke, a city councillor in Bristol, is proposing an amendment on referendums on changing local authority governance systems.

    "It is for the city of Bristol to decide what form of local government it wants to have," she argues.

    Labour local government spokesman Lord McKenzie of Luton says Bristol is the only city unable to vote to abolish the office of elected mayor if it wished to, following a referendum vote to establish one.

    "It does not seem right" that Bristol cannot reject the mayoral system, he claims.

  19. Early diagnoses

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding for the government, Health Minister Jane Ellison points out that the Department of Health have invested over £450m to improve early diagnoses of cancer.

    The project is working jointly with Cancer Research and Macmillan cancer support to find faster ways to diagnose cancers, especially rarer cancers or those with "difficult symptoms", she says.

  20. Labour strategy

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrew Gwynne announces that Labour will publish a "cancer strategy" within six months of winning an election, with the aim of making the UK the "best in Europe on cancer".

    Just over half of cancers are diagnosed at an early stage, but the new strategy will aim to raise this to two out of every three receiving an early diagnosis, followed by one week appointments.

    This will be made possible new investment paid for by a levy on the tobacco industry, he explains.

  21. Lottery licences

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Mancroft is introducing amendments to the mandatory conditions of lottery operating licences.

    He proposes removing the cap on the size of jackpots in society lotteries, which currently stands at £40,000.

    Lord Mancroft is president of the Lotteries Council.

    Lord Mancroft
  22. 'What more can be done'?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate for Labour, shadow health minister Andrew Gwynne says that the death of his mother from ovarian cancer, when he was 19-years-old, has left him asking "what more can be done".

    While cancer treatment has improved since then, progress has stalled, he claims, telling MPs that "cancer targets have been missed in the last three quarters" while the cancer treatment budget has been cut by £800m in real terms.

    Andrew Gwynne
  23. 'For local authorities'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokesman Lord Gardiner of Kimble says that the matter of busking "is for local authorities to look at".

    They can examine "the local circumstances and decide whether there is a problem".

  24. 'As much busking as possible'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Backing the amendment, Conservative peer Lord Deben praises the UK capital but says it could do with even more buskers to cheer people up.

    "London is the greatest city in the world," he says.

    "It is the only world city. We are immensely lucky to live in this great city. We should be thrilled about that every day."

    However, he adds: "This city needs as much busking as possible. There are some miserable places where more buskers will cheer us enormously."

  25. 'Powerful testimony'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Fellow Conservative John Baron intervenes to thank Mr Lopresti for his bravery.

    "There's nothing more powerful than hearing personal testimony," Mr Baron says.

    Mr Lopresti's "key message" of improved communication "is terribly important" he adds.

  26. Cancer survivor

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Bowel cancer survivor Jack Lopresti is on his feet to share his story with MPs.

    Though praising the care he received, he tells MPs that during his treatment his hospital falsified a letter from him to end his chemotherapy early.

    The experience "shattered" the confidence he'd had that he was getting straightforward treatment. "If they'd made a mistake on this, what else hadn't they discovered?" he asks.

    Pausing briefly to regain his composure Mr Lopresti, who has since received a "all clear" diagnosis, says he had "very lucky escape".

    Jack Lopresti
  27. Busking deregulation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Clement-Jones is now introducing an amendment to deregulate busking.

    He dismisses claims that the police need powers to deal with "busking-related offences".

    The Lib Dem peer asks: "What are these? Three-card trick artists on Westminster Bridge? Pickpockets in Covent Garden?"

    He says such activities have nothing to do with busking.

  28. 'Defective' amendment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokesman Lord Gardiner of Kimble says payments between broadcasters should be examined in greater detail.

    He says he is "sympathetic" to the intention of the amendment but it would not give ministers the powers to repeal section 73 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

    The act requires payments by public service broadcasters to cable companies to re-transit their programmes.

    He views the amendment as "defective" but says the government will bring forward legislation to repeal section 73 at a later date.

  29. Radiotherapy investment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Taking part in his second debate of the day, Labour's Grahame Morris argues that greater investment in radiotherapy could save "thousands of lives."

    He claims that cancer drugs only cure 2% of all cancers, yet the cancer drugs budget "consumes far larger proportion than radiotherapy because of the requirement to invest in infrastructure and staff".

    Modern technology has made radiotherapy more effective but the UK has 'taken [its] eye off the ball" leading it to fall behind some developing countries in its treatment of cancer, he adds.

  30. Earlier scans for brain tumours

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Rebecca Harris, chair of the all party group for brain tumours, is arguing for earlier brain scans for patients who display symptoms of tumour growth.

    Because brain tumours are rare many doctors wrongly diagnose sufferers with migraines, denying them vital treatment at earlier stages, she tells MPs.

  31. World cancer day

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    World Cancer Day was held yesterday, on 4 February.

    The campaign aims to take a positive and proactive approach to the fight against cancer "highlighting that solutions do exist across the continuum of cancer, and that they are within our reach".

  32. Picture: Lord Clement-Jones

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Clement-Jones
    Image caption: Lord Clement-Jones stands to introduce his amendment
  33. Ovarian cancer

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The next speaker, Labour's Sharon Hodgson, is using her speech to focus on ovarian cancer.

    She claims that less than 3% of women know all the symptoms of the cancer, of which around 7,100 women are diagnosed every year.

  34. Deregulation Bill resumes

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Report stage on the Deregulation Bill resumes with an amendment from Lib Dem peer Lord Clement-Jones on broadcast copyright.

    The amendment would repeal section 73 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (reception and re-transmission of wireless broadcast by cable).

    It would enable ministers to cancel the fees paid to cable TV companies by public broadcasters for re-transmission of their channels.

    Lord Clement-Jones argues the regulations date from the era of analogue broadcasting and are now outdated.

  35. Patient experience

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Continuing his opening speech, Mr Baron criticises "unacceptable" widespread variations in patient experience based on geographical and social groups.

    He says that although survival rates should be the priority, there should also be a greater focus on the patient experience of people with cancer, especially those with rarer cancers.

  36. Adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords now adjourns for 10 minutes until debate on the Deregulation Bill resumes.

  37. Post update

    @rcgp and @grahamemorris

    RCGP ‏(Royal College of General Practioners) tweets: .@drdanpoulter agrees with @grahamemorris to look into incentives for directing new GPs to underdoctored areas #GPdebate

    Grahame Morris MP ‏replies: .@rcgp @drdanpoulter : Probably first time ever! But on important issue of GP workforce planning.

  38. Cancer risks

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Cancer Research UK has released data predicting that cancer rates in the UK will rise to one in two people.

    The previous forecast was that one in three people would be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetimes.

    The charity has stated that longer life expectancies mean that more people will be affected.

  39. Comparing statistics

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In the first intervention of the debate, the Conservative MP Sir Edward Leigh says it is time for an "open" debate on the provision of health services.

    He notes that in France and Germany, where a social insurance system is in place, there are better cancer outcomes than in England.

  40. Cancer debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The second backbench business debate of the afternoon is a general debate on improving cancer outcomes.

    Opening the debate, the Conservative MP for Basildon and Billericay, John Baron, from the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on cancer, notes that there are now 2.5 million people living with cancer, an increase of half a million over last five years.

  41. Rewarding career

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Dr Poulter uses his speech to promote general practice, telling the House that "being a GP is a rewarding and well-paid career, with an average salary of £110,000 per year".

    He says the government has been working with medical schools to encourage people from more deprived backgrounds to take up a career in medicine.

    But he admits that the distribution of medical schools is traditionally based around larger cities, and admits there is a "challenge" to support "smaller medical schools" in smaller towns and cities.

  42. Government response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding for the government, Mr Poulter lays some of the blame at Labour's door.

    He says that it takes three years to train a GP after their foundation medical training so that "if there is a workforce crisis, it's because Labour was in power for 13 years [...] and there wasn't the foresight to train enough GPs".

  43. GP recruitment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    To end his speech, Mr Reed urges Health Minister Daniel Poulter to commit to writing to every MP who has raised concerns during the debate to say what the government is doing to increase the recruitment of GPs.

  44. Deteriorating experience

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Winding up the debate on behalf of Labour, shadow health minister Jamie Reed accuses the government of overseeing a "deterioration in patient experience", highlighting the growing number of people having to wait a week or more to see their GP.

  45. 'North South divide'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Grahame Morris highlights what he calls a "stark north-south divide" in GP services.

    While almost all trainee GP posts were filled in the south of England, in the north east, which he says has "the highest level of depravation and health inequality with an acute shortage of GPs", 30% of trainee places were unfilled.

    This presents as "serious threat to the delivery of GP services", he says.

  46. Short debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Consideration of the Deregulation Bill will resume in an hour's time.

    Peers are now taking part in a "lunch break" debate on maternity care.

    Labour's Lord Harrison tabled the question for debate, asking what the government is doing to improve maternity care and to ensure that maternity staff are trained and developed to meet future needs.

  47. BreakingBreaking News

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The amendment on delaying changes to the TV licence fee regime is approved by 178 votes to 175.

    The government is defeated by three votes.

  48. Division in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House divides to vote on Baroness Howe's amendment to the Deregulation Bill.

    The bill would give ministers the power to "replace the TV licensing offences with civil monetary penalties payable to the BBC".

    The amendment would delay any change in licence fee enforcement until 2017, after the renewal of the BBC's charter.

  49. Immigration effect

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    UKIP MP Mark Reckless says he used to think GPs have had it "rather good" but has since realised they currently face great pressures.

    While he agrees there is no consensus on how this happened seeing the population rise by close to four million people due to immigration, plus natural increase, has put greater demand on services, he argues.

  50. Licence fee enforcement review

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government culture, media and sport spokesman Lord Gardiner of Kimble tells peers that "people should not seek to avoid" paying the TV licence fee.

    "There needs to be an effective enforcement regime," he insists.

    Lord Gardiner says a review by David Perry QC aims to find the best outcome "for the licence fee payer, for the courts system and, I emphasise, for the BBC itself".

    Culture Secretary Sajid Javid announced the review in September last year. It is expected to report in June.

  51. Supermarket services

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris warns that if the government do not deal with the problems with accessing GP services, large private supermarkets may start picking up the mantle.

    If this were to happen, "those in the rural areas will not get there", potentially denying vital services to parts of the population, she says.

  52. Opposition support

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour culture, media and sport spokesman Lord Stevenson of Balmacara gives the backing of the opposition front bench for Baroness Howell's amendment.

  53. Picture: Floella Benjamin

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Floella Benjamin
    Image caption: Floella Benjamin was one of the presenters of "Play Away" in 1983
  54. Picture: Michael Cashman

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Michael Cashman
    Image caption: Michael Cashman - pictured in 1988 - played Colin Russell in EastEnders
  55. More support

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Cashman, a former EastEnders actor, and Lib Dem Baroness Benjamin, the former children's TV presenter, give their support to the amendment.

    Baroness Benjamin says she is concerned about the impact on children's programming.

  56. Charter renewal

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The purpose of the amendment is to delay any change to the licence fee enforcement regime until after the BBC's charter is renewed.

    The BBC's Royal Charter comes up for renewal every 10 years. The current Charter runs until 31 December 2016.

    Liberal Democrat Lord Clement-Jones says the amendment is about "timing".

    He believes the measure in the bill "is a Trojan horse designed to damage the BBC" but concedes other supporters of the amendment may differ on decriminalisation.

  57. 'Distorted' contracts

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Health Minister Paul Burstow congratulates the government on identifying the need to train more GPs and increase the number of places.

    But the government has so far been unable to recruit enough GPs to fill these places because "payment for activity" contracts in acute services and a "distorted" contracting models for primary care have led to a reduction of funding for GPs, he warns.

  58. 'Dark forces'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Grade of Yarmouth, a former chairman of the BBC, says he sympathises with Baroness Corston's opposition to criminalising licence fee evasion.

    However, he argues that "there are risks that the enemies of the BBC would see the opportunity to remove the compulsory element of the licence fee" and replace it with a subscription system.

    "There are dark forces at work," he claims.

    Lord Grade
  59. 'Consistently falling funding'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Green MP Caroline Lucas says she jointly tabled today's motion to ask why the government has "allowed consistently falling GP funding".

    Ms Lucas says the drop in share of NHS budget for doctors surgeries comes at a time when GPs are stretched. 80% of GPs say they don't have sufficient resources to provide care, she adds.

    The current model of GPs seeing up to 40-50 patients a day is simply unsustainable, she adds.

  60. 'Menu of choices'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Another Labour peer, Lord Lipsey, suggests there could be a graduated licence fee or "a menu of choices".

    People could pay a level of fee based on the amount of BBC services they could access, he proposes.

  61. Against criminalisation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Corston is speaking in opposition to criminal sanctions for non-payers of the licence fee, arguing that people should not go to prison.

    Baroness Corston
  62. TV licence

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Baroness Howe is introducing an amendment which would delay changes to TV licence enforcement measures until 1 April 2017.

    The bill would replace the criminal sanctions for not paying a fine for licence evasion with "civil monetary penalties payable to the BBC".

    Baroness Howe argues the amendment would provide more stability to the BBC's income stream.

  63. Deregulation Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That concludes the short third reading of the Pensions Bill.

    The next business is the second day of report stage consideration of the Deregulation Bill.

    The government has called the bill, which aims to reduce the regulatory burden on businesses and individuals, "the latest step in the ongoing drive to remove unnecessary bureaucracy".

  64. Retaining women

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Sarah Newton

    Conservative MP Sarah Newton says work needs to be done to enable to women to combine "care of children or elderly parents" with maintaining "their abilities to be general practitioners".

    Flexible working arrangements could enable more women to stay in, or return to, the NHS, she argues; and allow women to contribute to sustainable GP services.

  65. 'A much better bill'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The second and final amendment concerns the transfer of pensions, and was introduced by the government.

    Government spokesman Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth strikes a conciliatory tone with his opening speech, thanking the opposition for "its constructive and positive engagement" and other peers for their scrutiny of the bill.

    He says the bill will return to the Commons "a much better bill than it was before".

    Lord Bourne
    Image caption: Lord Bourne says the scrutiny of the Pensions Bill showed "the House of Lords at its best"
  66. 'Get the policy clear'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hollis withdraws her amendment but urges ministers to "get the policy clear" so that the information provided to people can be clear.

  67. 'Deprivation of assets'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Treasury spokesman Lord Newby says that someone moving their ISA investments to their pension pot would find that it "does not qualify for deprivation of assets treatment".

    The term "deprivation of assets" means the reduction of assets by spending, gifts or investments which affects local authority means tests for care home provision.

  68. Post update

    @PriskMark

    Conservative MP Mark Prisk ‏tweets: Good debate on GP services. Getting more doctors to choose GP is vital.

  69. 'No inconsistency'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour work and pensions spokesman Lord Bradley, backing the amendment, calls for "no inconsistency across the country" in the the information provided on the impact of their pension choices.

  70. Modern problem

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP John Howell blames stretched GP services on a modern desire for an instant cure.

    He tells MPs there is an increased expectation of what GP can do. "People are not giving minor ailments time to heal themselves but expecting there is a medicine on tap for everything thus going to a GP as soon as symptoms appear," he says.

    Mr Howell partially blames this on advertisements listing symptoms that encourage people to visit their GP.

  71. Post update

    @DouglasCarswell

    UKIP MP Douglas Carswell tweets: Patrician politicians blaming patients for pressure on GPs. In what other sphere are too many punters seen as a problem?

  72. 'Higher benefit bills'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hollis argues that people could transfer their ISAs to their pension pot in order to avoid their savings being taken into account when assessing social care bills in old age.

    This could work to that person's advantage, she says, but would mean "for the rest of us, higher benefit bills".

    Baroness Hollis of Heigham
  73. First amendment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Third reading in the House of Lords gives peers a final chance to table amendments to a bill, and two amendments have been tabled today.

    The bill gives legal force to the announcement in last year's Budget that people aged 55 and over would have more flexibility about how to access their defined contribution pension savings.

    The first amendment would require "appropriate information" from the Treasury "so that people can make informed choices as to the effect of pensions freedoms and flexibilities on income-related benefits and social care costs".

    Labour peer Baroness Hollis of Heigham, introducing the amendment, claims that pensions and ISAs will become "interchangeable".

  74. Pension Schemes Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now move on to a brief third reading of the Pension Schemes Bill.

    This is the final stage of debate on the bill in the Lords, which establishes a new legislative framework for private pensions.

    The provisions of the bill apply to England, Wales and Scotland.

  75. National Gallery strike

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    On 3 February, staff at the National Gallery in London began a five-day strike in a row over the privatisation of services.

    The walk-out, over plans to hand visitor services to a private company, will run until 7 February.

    PCS general secretary Mark Serwotka said: "The sell-off plan is reckless and risks damaging the worldwide reputation of what is one of the UK's greatest cultural assets, and we are determined to stop it."

    Nicholas Penny, director of the National Gallery, said for the gallery to continue to thrive as a public entity change was "essential".

  76. GP strains

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Derek Twigg

    Labour's Derek Twigg, who is leading the debate, tells MPs that his constituents are "increasingly" contacting him to tell him it is getting more difficult to get an appointment with a GP, often having to wait for many weeks, and often no longer have a named GP.

    "There is little doubt about growing demands on GPs" from demographic changes, more complex health needs and increased mental health workloads are affecting GPs, he argues.

  77. National Gallery question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The fourth and final question is from the crossbench peer the Earl of Clancarty.

    He asks about the the National Gallery's decision to privatise their visitor services.

    He claims the move is "wholly against the public interest".

    Lord Gardiner of Kimble, replying for the government, argues that the gallery will be able to extend its opening hours and increase revenue.

  78. Brownfield development

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The third question is tabled by Lib Dem Lord Greaves, who asks what steps the government is taking to promote housing development on brownfield land, rather than greenfield sites.

  79. Sustainable GP services

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn to the backbench business debate on building sustainable GP services.

    The motion, chosen by the Backbench Business Committee, reads:

    "That this House notes the vital role played by local GP services in communities throughout the UK, with an estimated one million patients receiving care from a family doctor or nurse every day; believes that the UK's tradition of excellent general practice provision is a central factor in the NHS being consistently ranked as one of the world's best health services by the independent Commonwealth Fund; expresses concern, therefore, that the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP), through its Put patients first: Back general practice campaign, is warning that these services are under severe strain, with increasing concerns raised by constituents about access to their GP and 91 per cent of GPs saying general practice does not have sufficient resources to deliver high quality patient care; further notes that the share of NHS funding spent on general practice has fallen to an all-time low of 8.3 per cent, and that over 300,000 people across the UK have signed the campaign petition calling for this trend to be reversed; welcomes the emphasis placed in NHS England's Five Year Forward View on strengthening general practice and giving GPs a central role in developing new models of care integrated around patients; and calls on the Secretary of State for Health to work with NHS England and the RCGP to secure the financial future of local GP services as a matter of urgency."

  80. MPs communications

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP David Davis asks for conformation whether MPs communications are protected from investigation by police, following a report by the Interception of Communications Commissioner that found "adequate safeguards to protect journalistic sources" were not in place.

    It is important that MPs' sources are kept safe in order to encourage whistleblowers, he argues.

    Speaker John Bercow says he will make inquiries and report back to the House.

  81. Post update

    @LabourLordsUK

    LabourLordsUK tweets: #LordsQ Sue Nye highlights impact of reduced no. of midwives on #NHS ability to help new mums suffering mental health issues #TimetoTalk

  82. Mother and baby

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The second question - on postnatal depression - has been put by Baroness Royall. Earl Howe is answering on behalf of the government.

  83. Lack of time

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leader of the House William Hague is turning down most of today's debate requests due to a lack of time in this Parliament.

  84. Airspace

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are asking whether the Russian ambassador has offered an explanation for the presence near UK airspace of two Russian planes.

    Last week, Russian military planes flying near UK airspace caused "disruption to civil aviation", the Foreign Office has said.

    It said the two Russian planes did not enter UK airspace, but the manoeuvres were "part of an increasing pattern of out-of-area operations" by Russia.

    At the time, Russia's ambassador said the patrols were "routine" and dismissed concerns.

    The ambassador's response will be put in the library of the House, peers are told.

    A Russian Tu-95 Bear 'H' aircraft
    Image caption: Two Russian Tu-95 Bear H aircraft were "escorted" by RAF jets (file photo)
  85. English rebellion?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Philip Davies backs calls for a debate on English Votes for English Laws because he believes the government's plans are flawed.

    Proposals put forward by the government still allow "Scottish votes for English laws" he says and if a vote were to be put forward Mr Hague would find "most of [his] parliamentary party" would vote against the measure.

  86. First question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The first question is: What recent assessment has been made of the capability of Russia's armed forces?

    Conservative peer Lord Spicer asks the question.

  87. English Votes on English Laws

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP John Glen asks for a debate and a vote on the government's proposals for English votes on English Laws as soon as possible.

    Leader of the House William Hague says it is his intention to do "everything he possibly can" to deliver this.

  88. Introduction

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are listening to the ceremony which marks the introduction of a new member.

    The latest peer to join the red benches is the Bishop of Leeds.

    The Rt Rev Nicholas Baines will sit in the House as one of the Lords Spiritual.

  89. Hit-and-runs debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Steve McCabe asks for a debate on tackling hit-and-run offences, after a 12-year-old constituent of his was run down on a pedestrian crossing.

    William Hague says he doesn't have time for additional debates but promises to raise the issue with justice ministers. He suggests Mr McCabe raises the issue during oral questions.

  90. Topics for debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are raising topics with William Hague that they would like to see debated in the House of Commons.

  91. 'Grave discourtesy'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg says it is a "grave discourtesy to this House" that a debate on the free movement of EU citizens has been delayed for over a year, denying the "proper scrutiny procedures".

    William Hague says it is his intention that some of the debates put forward by the European Scrutiny Committee will be debated on the floor of the House.

  92. Question time

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Oral questions in the Lords begin in a few minutes.

    The first is on the Russian armed forces, followed by questions on supporting women suffering from postnatal depression; promoting housing on brownfield land, rather than greenfield sites and the National Gallery's decision to privatise their visitor services.

  93. No extra opposition days

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    William Hague denies Ms Eagle's request for additional opposition days. He tells MPs that though the government do try to avoid statements on Opposition days, they can't always be avoided.

  94. Cam-nesia

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angela Eagle coins a new phrase to describe what she tells MPs are the government's forgotten promises "Cam-nesia".

    "Cutting the deficit not the NHS: Camnesia. The greenest government ever: Camnesia. Balancing the books before the end of this parliament: Camnesia," she says.

  95. Extra opposition time

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Leader of the House Angela Eagle asks for an extra half day of Opposition day debates after Labour's debates were curtailed yesterday due to two statements.

  96. Deregulating...

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The main business in the Lords today is the second day of report stage consideration of the Deregulation Bill.

    The bill aims to provide for the reduction of burdens resulting from legislation for businesses or other organisations and repeal legislation which has no practical use.

  97. Peers meeting

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords will meet at 11.00 GMT. After oral questions, peers will debate the Pension Schemes Bill at third reading.

  98. Business Statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leader of the House William Hague is now setting out the forthcoming business for the House of Commons during his weekly business statement.

    William Hague
  99. Topical questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn to "topical questions" for the last 15 minutes of question time.

    During the topical questions slot, MPs can ask supplementary questions on any subject relating to the department's responsibilities.

  100. Energy efficiency

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Meg Munn calls on the government to secure greater investment to support companies researching energy efficiency, in memory of former Labour MP Frank Hooley who she informs the House has died aged 91.

    Energy Secretary Ed Davey says he works very closely with the Business, Innovation and Skills department to ensure funds are available, especially for "energy-intensive industries".

  101. Post update

    ‏@DECCgovuk

    DECC tweets: Ed Davey: 'ECO and Green Deal schemes have helped more than 1m homes become more energy efficient' #deccorals

  102. Green Deal

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Andrew Gwynne accuses the government of coming in 5,000 people short of their target to get 10,000 people using the Green Deal.

    Energy Secretary Ed Davey dispute Mr Gwynne's figures, telling MPs that over 445,000 Green Deal assessments have taken place, over 70% of which go on to install measures or intend to install measures.

    Mr Gwynne's figures are based on the number of people who have accessed "Green Deal finance, which is only one part of the package", Mr Davey says.

  103. Post update

    ‏@ACunninghamMP

    Labour MP Alex Cunningham tweets: In the Commons to raise failure of the Government's Green Deal which isn't delivering the energy efficiency we need for our homes

  104. Picture: Dennis Skinner

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Dennis Skinner
  105. Coal question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Dennis Skinner stands to ask whether the Commons would be discussing wind power if "the Tories had not shut more than 100 pits".

    He asks whether state aid will be given to three remaining pits, allowing 3,000 miners to keep their jobs.

    Energy Minister Matthew Hancock replies that he comes "from coal-mining stock" and has delivered support to the three deep pits so that they can remain open, within the constraints of affordability.

    He says he'll continue to work with all parties, including the NUM (National Union of Mineworkers).

  106. High energy prices

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Alan Duncan argues that the "last thing" the energy market needs is a policy to freeze prices, as suggested by Labour, while prices are high.

    Mr Duncan says the "mere announcement" of the policy has "distorted the [energy] market".

    Energy Secretary Ed Davey says the "evidence is clear" that if Labour's plan had been implemented people would be paying higher energy prices now.

  107. Energy bills

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Mike Kane

    Labour MP Mike Kane begins a series of questions from Labour MPs who are listing how many children in their constituencies are in households trapped in energy debt.

    Global changes in commodity markets and the falling coast of oil mean energy companies could be driving down household bills by £164.

    Energy and Climate Change Ed Davey agrees its vital these savings are passed on. "We are on it," he tells MPs.

  108. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Today's adjournment debate, on beer duty, is opened by the Conservative Andrew Griffiths, the chair of the all-party beer group. He called for a further cut in beer duty in December, so don't be surprised if he does so again.

  109. Backbench business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The day's main debates are on two subjects chosen by the Backbench Business Committee.

    The first is on building sustainable GP services. A motion from Labour MP Derek Twigg and Green Caroline Lucas expresses concerns about the strains on GPs and calls for the health secretary to secure the financial future of GP practices.

    The second is on improving cancer outcomes.

  110. Good morning

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons opens for business at 9.30 GMT, where MPs start with energy and climate change questions, before hearing the weekly Business Statement, from the Leader of the House, William Hague.