Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. The day began at 09.30 GMT with questions to energy and climate change ministers.
  2. There was be an urgent question at 10.30 GMT on Barts hospital, then a statement on fiscal responsibility and fairness.
  3. After that, William Hague set out the week's forthcoming business. MPs spent the rest of the day in the Commons debating the Budget.
  4. Peers met at 11.00 GMT for oral questions, followed by debates. The first was on the Select Committee report on the Inquiries Act 2005.
  5. Following that, the Lords held debates on the European Public Prosecutor's Office; and science and mathematics students from overseas.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

  1. Lords adjourn - and good evening

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The debate on international students wraps up and the final piece of business - the Health Service Commissioner for England (Complaint Handling) Bill - goes through without any debate, which concludes the day in the Lords.

    The Lords will return on Monday at 14.30 GMT.

  2. Genuine students

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government Spokesperson, Baroness Williams of Trafford, defends student visa reforms quoting a National Audit Office report that estimated 25% of international students who came to the UK in 2009/10 came to work rather than study.

    The Baroness also recognises that the government does need to better communicate the UK's offer to students in order to prevent being overtaken by competitor nations such as Australia and the US.

    Baroness Williams of Trafford
  3. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That's the end of today's debates in the Commons.

    MPs are sitting tomorrow from 09.30 GMT, not for private members' bills as is usual for a Friday sitting, but for a third day of debate on the Budget.

    The debate will focus on local growth.

    Stay with us today as the House of Lords continues its debate on international students.

  4. Three earls and a viscount

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Stevenson of Balmacara

    Shadow spokesperson for Business, Innovation and Skills, Lord Stevenson of Balmacara, praises the quality of the debate noting its aristocratic bent with contributions from three earls and a viscount.

    He goes on to attack the government's response to the report as defensive and brusque to the point of rudeness.

    The government response says there is no limit on the number of international students and that there exist a number of myths and inaccurate perceptions on the subject.

  5. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Budget debate is adjourned until tomorrow.

    Labour MP Robert Flello has secured the final, short debate, which concerns the Shooter's Hill mobile phone mast in his constituency of Stoke on Trent South.

  6. Summing up

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    We're on the final wind-up speech in today's leg of the Budget debate.

    Continuing an election theme of trying to bring back the feel-good factor, Treasury Minister Andrea Leadsom says there is now a mood of "national optimism".

    She says it is a myth that "when the economy grows, it is government that does the running".

    "It is not the government, it is businesses and hard-working individuals."

  7. 'Productivity gap'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow business, innovation and skills minister Iain Wright says the Budget "offered little to business".

    He argues: "Tackling the productivity gap is the single biggest means by which Britain will improve competitiveness, improve living standards for all and ensure that the deficit is brought down."

    He tells MPs: "UK output per hour has fallen to 17% below the rest of the G7 - the largest gap since 1991.

    "It takes a British worker until Friday to produce what a German or American worker produces by Thursday."

  8. One in, one out?

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    In a neat counter-balance to Viscount Tenby's valedictory speech, Earl Kinnoull now stands to make a maiden one.

    He says he has been touched by the warmth of members of the House, but regrets the lack of an iPad app to help with navigation around the building as he envisions getting lost for "some moons to come".

  9. 'Economic incompetence'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Debbie Abrahams says the government has been "crowing about their economic performance" but the coalition inherited "an economy that was growing at the end of 2010 but then flatlined for three years".

    She adds: "The government is borrowing £219bn more than you estimated in 2010. How about that for economic incompetence?"

  10. 'Unwelcoming UK'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Committee Chair and Oxford academic, Lord Krebs, says there has been a drop in international students coming to the UK and specifically identifies a 42% decrease in students coming from India.

    He argues that circumstantial evidence suggests government polices on immigration have prevented STEM students from choosing to study in the UK.

    Lord Krebs
  11. 'On the precipice'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Annette Brooke outlines why she supported coalition with the Conservatives in 2010.

    "I genuinely believed that we were on the point, the precipice, of a major, major decline in the financial markets and I felt that achieving financial stability was the most important thing that we should do," she says.

    She adds that, while she has disagreed with some government policies, "I still remain convinced that the right thing was done, and there are many aspects of this Budget that I am proud to stand up and defend".

    One of these "aspects" is raising the personal allowance for income taxpayers.

    Annette Brooke
  12. International Stem Students

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Krebs opens the last committee report debate, this one concerning the Report of the Science and Technology Committee on International Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) students.

    The report blames "contradictory" government policies for the fall in international STEM student numbers.

    The committee's report argues that international students enrich the experience of domestic students, provide skills needed for growth and contribute's to the UK's soft power.

    The committee also notes the contribution made by international students to university finances.

  13. Post update

    @AlecShelbrooke

    Conservative MP Alec Shelbrooke tweets: #Budget2015: building a fairer economy with a plan to tackle tax avoidance and evasion that'll bring in an extra £3.1billion to the treasury

  14. 'Bank of mum and dad'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP's Mike Weir says that the new "Help to Buy" ISA will be welcomed by some and he expects "better off parents" to open accounts for their offspring.

    "But it's just another variation on the bank of mum and dad," he argues.

  15. Welcoming the report

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    UKIP Peer, Lord Pearson of Rannoch, also welcomes the report stating that "it is the first time in 25 years that I am able to congratulate the EU select committee on one of its reports and indeed the government on its reply."

    The government response reiterates that the UK will not participate in the EPPO.

  16. Prosecution of cases

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hope of Craighead welcomes the report and the government's decision not to opt in to the establishment of the EPPO.

    He argues that it is "difficult to come to the conclusion that the EPPO would be more able to prosecute a case than nation states".

    Lord Hope of Craighead
  17. European Public Prosecutor's Office

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Lords now turn to the report of the European Union Committee on the impact of the European Public Prosecutor's Office (EPPO) on the United Kingdom.

    The establishment of the EPPO was proposed by the EU Commission with the purpose of investigating and prosecuting perpetrators of "offences against the Union's financial interests".

    The committee's report expresses concerns about the proposal fearing that the EPPO would be overworked and that a centralised body could complicate the prosecution of crimes.

  18. 'Help to buy' welcomed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Another London MP, Conservative Mary MacLeod, welcomes the "help to buy ISA" and argues it will help Londoners onto the housing ladder.

    She says her constituency of Brentford and Isleworth has "a growing economy, a growing number of jobs and rising living standards".

    Mary MacLeod
  19. Housing costs

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Budget debate turns to housing, as Meg Hillier, the Labour MP for Hackney South and Shoreditch, criticises the sale of "huge, publicly owned sites" for high-cost housing.

    She says that Kingsland fire station is being sold off "for a rumoured £28 million - this clearly can't be for affordable housing" while the Mount Pleasant Royal Mail sorting office in neighbouring Islington is being sold "mostly for luxury homes".

    She says the "ISA for homebuyers" announced in the Budget "really just fuels the house price increases we've seen in my constituency".

    The chancellor announced a new "Help to Buy" ISA for first-time buyers which will allow government to top up by £50 every £200 saved for a deposit.

  20. Lessons learned

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Faulks, summing up for the frontbench, says that lessons will be learned from the report for the future.

    He says he believes the 2005 Act works well. The government accepts three amendments to the rules, out of the committee's four, and will make the changes as soon as possible in the new Parliament.

    Lord Faulks goes on to more controversial subjects. Why did HM's Government reject the committee's recommendation on rules 13 to 15 on warning letters? he asks.

    He says that a departure from the current approach could lead to a loss of the co-operation of witnesses, he implies.

  21. 'Hayekian nightmare'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Kelvin Hopkins renews the charge that the cuts are ideologically motivated.

    He paints a picture of "an agenda which is really about diminishing the role of the state, on the road to the Hayekian nightmare of a world government by private markets, not by democratic government".

    Kelvin Hopkins
  22. More Tory support

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Chris Kelly is the next to praise the Budget, combining an old and new Tory slogan.

    "Thanks to this government's long-term economic plan, Britain is walking tall again," he says.

    And he warns against a "return to the chaos of the past".

  23. 'Incompetence and arrogance'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Soley rises to support the recommendations of the report and regrets the government's response describing ministers as incompetent and arrogant.

    The government has rejected the committee's recommendation concerning warning letters stating that, although universally adopted by inquiries, sending out warning letters is technically already at the discretion of the chair.

  24. Tory support

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Now it's the turn of the Tories to praise the Budget.

    And Mark Simmonds, the MP for Boston and Skegness, obliges.

    He says he supports the Budget against the background of the fastest growing economy in the G7, a record number of jobs having been created, high employment, the deficit down, debt falling and more than three-quarters of a million jobs having been created.

    Mark Simmonds
  25. Warning letters

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Buscombe is criticising the practice of sending out "warning letters" prior to the publication of an inquiry report.

    Warning letters are sent to participants in an inquiry who may be criticised in the final report.

    Letters sent to, amongst others, Tony Blair and Jack Straw have been blamed for the delay in the publication of the Chilcot Report into the Iraq War.

    The committee has recommended revoking the rules that make warning letters a mandatory part of conducting an inquiry and argues that inquiry chairs should be allowed more discretion on the matter.

  26. Hollow sound

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Adrian Bailey, the chair of the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee, tells the House that it is difficult to feel pride, and hard to walk tall on your way to a food bank - and that, he says, is the feeling of people who are desperate for alleviation from the policies of the government.

    "'Walking tall' and 'sun shining' rings hollow in their ears," he says.

    He says the reduction in income also rings true for the average family; an experience, he says, MPs will recognise from their own constituencies.

  27. Post update

    @politicshome

    PoliticsHome tweets: .@vincecable hits back at @edballsmp insisting top 20% "have paid four times as much in terms of deficit reduction" than poorest 20%

  28. Tribute to Viscount Tenby

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Pannick is next on the speakers' list and pays tribute to the departing Lord with a quote about the House of Lords from Viscount Tenby's grandfather, David Lloyd George: "A body of five hundred men chosen at random from amongst the unemployed."

    Lord Pannick notes that Viscount Tenby has never been unemployed.

  29. Inequality

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Vince Cable addresses the accusations that Britain has become a more unequal society.

    This is a problem we share across the world, he says. He adds that the top 10% or 20% have contributed the most under austerity measures.

    And he points to research that he says shows that inequality under this government is not worse than it was under a Labour government.

  30. Valedictory speech

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    There is a hiatus in discussion of the committee's report as Viscount Tenby stands to deliver his valedictory speech.

    Viscount Tenby is the grandson of former Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, and has sat in the Lords as one of 90 hereditary peers since 1983.

    Members of the House of Lords have only been allowed to resign or retire since the introduction of the House of Lords Reform Act 2014.

    Viscount Tenby
  31. 'Pulling the plug'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Morris of Aberavon expresses the concern that the independence of inquiries can be damaged by the desire to keep costs down.

    He suggests that "pulling the plug" on an inquiry should be considered out of bounds by ministers.

  32. Cable replies

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business Secretary Vince Cable rises to respond for the government.

    "The shadow chancellor does outrage very well," he says.

    Vince Cable
  33. Government 'borrowing more'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Balls says the government is borrowing more and "failing" to reduce the national debt.

    He claims the Conservatives are planning "even deeper cuts in the next next three years than in the last five years".

  34. 'Salmon Principles'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Woolf refers to the "Salmon Principles" which set out how participants in an inquiry should be treated.

    The principles were established by Lord Justice Salmon in 1966 in the aftermath of Lord Denning's inquiry into the Profumo Scandal.

    The principles include allowing a participant the opportunity of preparing their case, the right to call witnesses and access to some level of legal support.

  35. Chance to respond

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leader of the opposition Ed Miliband replied to yesterday's Budget statement by the chancellor, so the second day of debate gives shadow chancellor Ed Balls his chance to respond in the House.

    Ed Balls
  36. Committee report

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Select Committee found that the Inquiries Act 2005 has "worked well" but recommended the setting up of a Central Inquiries Unit with the aim of making future inquiries "more efficient, more streamlined and less costly to the public".

    The Committee's report can be found here.

  37. Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Questions on Commons business and points of order to the Speaker are over.

    Shadow chancellor Ed Balls is opening the second day of debate on the Budget.

  38. 'One of the most agreeable'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Paul Flynn, who represents Newport West, pays his own tribute to Mr Hague, who served as Secretary of State for Wales in the 1990s.

    Mr Flynn calls Mr Hague "one of the most agreeable alien governor generals we've had".

  39. 'I hate to break the news...'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to a question from Chris Bryant, William Hague comments that the Labour MP was once a Conservative.

    "I hate to break the news to the benches opposite, but he was a member of the Oxford University Conservative Association," the leader of the House says.

    He adds that Mr Bryant supported proportional representation, "which made him a rather suspicious character".

    Chris Bryant
    Image caption: Labour's Chris Bryant: a former Conservative
  40. Last business questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    William Hague is at the despatch box for his last business questions as Leader of the House.

    Mr Hague is leaving the Commons at the election. He has represented Richmond in North Yorkshire since a by-election in 1989.

    William Hague
  41. New debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Now the debate on the Select Committee report on the Inquiries Act 2005 has begun.

    Lord Shutt of Greetland is introducing the report, which is entitled The Inquiries Act 2005: post-legislative scrutiny and was published in March 2014. Its purpose is to examine whether the Act is an adequate framework for public inquiries.

  42. Post update

    @paulwaugh

    PoliticsHome.com's Paul Waugh tweets: Very generous tribute to Hague from @angelaeagle: 'the only northern Powerhouse the Tories have ever had'. Hague smiles

  43. 'Only northern powerhouse'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Turning on the Lib Dems, Angela Eagle says Danny Alexander - "the chancellor's apprentice" - has just delivered a "faux Budget" to the House.

    But she pays her own tribute to Yorkshireman Mr Hague, calling him "the only northern powerhouse the Tories have ever had".

    Angela Eagle
  44. 'Devoid of business'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angela Eagle thanks William Hague for his "gracious" tributes, but this does not stop her from going on the attack.

    "This is a Parliament which will be remembered for being so devoid of business in the its second half that 'zombie government' has entered the national lexicon, and so badly managed that they have lost two MPs to UKIP, seven cabinet ministers and no fewer than 103 votes in the House of Lords," she says.

    She also repeats the Labour line that the government has produced "a Budget people won't believe".

  45. Post update

    ‏@Alex__Stevenson

    Journalist Alex Stevenson tweets: William Hague is now making his last business statement to the Commons. Feels like his time in the job has gone by in a flash

  46. Statement in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Health Minister Earl Howe is now repeating the answer to an urgent question in the Commons on Barts Health NHS Trust.

    The Lords often hear statements in this way.

  47. Business statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leader of the House William Hague is announcing the forthcoming business in the Commons - or what's left of it, as the current Parliament will only sit for one more week.

    "This is the last weekly business statement of this Parliament," Mr Hague says.

    He thanks his Labour shadow, Angela Eagle, for being a "constructive colleague" and also pays tribute to his Lib Dem deputy, Tom Brake.

  48. Burmese demonstrations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    And peers move onto the fourth question today: from Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead, asking what assessment has been made of the recent actions by police in Burma in response to student demonstrations.

    Hundreds of police in Burma broke up a demonstration by students who say a new law stifles academic freedom. A BBC Burmese reporter at the scene said dozens of protestors were injured, and more than 100 arrested.

  49. Voting with the government?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Debbie Abrahams asks if Danny Alexander will be voting with the government to approve George Osborne's Budget and, if not, whether he will resign as chief secretary.

    "I will vote in favour of all the Budget resolutions, as I think they should," Mr Alexander tells the Labour benches.

  50. Question on Daesh

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are hearing the response of Baroness Anelay of St John's about the US-led coalition clearing the Daesh out of the territories they currently occupy.

    Daesh is the Arabic acronym for "Islamic State", which is also known in English as ISIS, ISIL or IS.

    Baroness Warsi asks if the name Daesh can be used by the UK government in future. Baroness Anelay agrees that it is preferable, but that it can lead to confusion in the UK, where the more common term for the group is IS, or ISIL.

  51. 'Pretend he's important'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP Treasury spokesman Stewart Hosie says today's statement has been "heavily redacted".

    He observes waspishly: "It's almost as if the chief secretary is trying to pretend he's important."

    Mr Alexander, in turn, accuses the SNP of wanting to "break up and bankrupt the United Kingdom".

    Stewart Hosie
  52. 'Absolute betrayal'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Adam Afriyie launches an attack on the Lib Dems and claims today's statement represents "the Westminster bubble at its absolute worse".

    He says the Lib Dems have "betrayed their voters" and Danny Alexander's statement is "an absolute betrayal of their role in government".

  53. Post update

    @iainmartin1

    Journalist Iain Martin ‏tweets: Dear Lib Dems: You're in coalition. You agreed to the Budget. You'll vote for it. An alternative LD Budget insults intelligence of voters.

  54. 'Ruling out' coalition with Tories?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chris Leslie asks if the Libs Dems are "ruling out" another coalition with the Conservatives, if they do not agree with George Osborne's Budget.

    Danny Alexander retorts that his statement has been "collectively agreed by the government as an alternative fiscal scenario".

  55. 'Party political pleading'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow chief secretary to the Treasury Chris Leslie accuses Danny Alexander of using "the government despatch box for his party political pleading".

    He says statements are "supposed to be by ministers speaking collectively" on behalf of the government.

    And he jokes that MPs expect several Commons debates on the Budget, "but not several Budgets".

    Chris Leslie
  56. First question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    And now peers turn their attention to questions.

    Baroness Massey of Darwen is the first to stand to ask a question, about the government's plans to make PSHCE a statutory part of the school curriculum.

    Currently, PSHCE - Personal , Social, Health and Citizenship Education - is currently not a statutory part of the national school curriculum.

  57. New peer

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers begin their day with the introduction of Sir Robert Kerslake, as a new peer. Baron Kerslake, as he is now known, is welcomed to the House of Lords.

    Lord Best and Lord Adonis are his supporters.

    Baron Kerslake
  58. Labour heckles

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Danny Alexander has been getting through his speech in the face of angry heckling from the Labour benches.

    Danny Alexander faces the Labour benches
  59. 'Another way?'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Danny Alexander says that many people will have watched the chancellor's Budget statement yesterday and asked: "Isn't there another way to do this?"

    He says his statement today is for "all those left cold by yesterday's statement".

    He repeats a Lib Dem mantra - that the party would borrow less than Labour and cut less that the Conservatives.

  60. Post update

    @RebeccaKeating

    Rebecca Keating

    BBC News

    "They don't like to hear it" on Labour benches @DannyAlexander says but given the level of shouting in #HoC I doubt anyone can hear it

  61. Post update

    @politicshome

    PoliticsHome ‏tweets: Bercow statement before Lib Dems 'alternative Budget' appeared to suggest they are not allowed to use Commons to promote their own policies

  62. Post update

    @timsculthorpe

    PA's Parliamentary Editor Tim Sculthorpe tweets: A very large proportion of the Lib Dem party is not here as Danny Alexander rubbishes #Budget2015 at the Government Despatch Box.

  63. 'Fiscal responsibility' statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander is making a statement on "fiscal responsibility and fairness".

    This is effectively a statement to set out the Liberal Democrats' fiscal plans.

    Before Mr Alexander begins, Speaker John Bercow tells MPs that "these statements have to be ministerial".

    Using them for "purely party purposes" would "put the chair in an awkward position", he adds.

  64. 'Anxiety across east London'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim Fitzpatrick, the Labour MP for Poplar and Limehouse, says there is "anxiety across east London about the state of our health service".

    Minister Jane Ellison, who is the Conservative MP for Battersea, tells him: "As a London MP myself, I do know some of the challenges."

  65. Barts Health NHS Trust

    With a turnover of £1.25bn and a workforce of 14,000, Barts Health NHS Trust is the largest NHS trust in England.

    Its hospitals include St Bartholomew's Hospital in the City, the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, the London Chest Hospital in Bethnal Green, Newham University Hospital in Plaistow, Mile End Hospital and Whipps Cross University Hospital in Leytonstone.

  66. About special measures

    The special measures regime is designed to offer the support trusts need to improve.

    One of the first steps at Whipps Cross is strengthening the leadership team - the hospital will have a dedicated managing director and a director of nursing, as well as a medical director to oversee its day-to-day running.

    Dr Tim Peachey, associate medical director at the NHS Trust Development Authority, will also work with the Trust to raise its standards.

    Trust chief executive Peter Morris said: "We are very sorry for the failings identified by the CQC in some of our services at Whipps Cross and we know the Trust has a big challenge ahead."

    Whipps Cross University Hospital
  67. 'Put in the public domain'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Minister Jane Ellison says the government will "put in the public domain measures that need to be taken to put this hospital back on track".

    Jane Ellison
  68. Good morning from the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Lords kicks off at 11.00 GMT with the introduction of Sir Robert Kerslake who was Head of the Civil Service from January 2012 to September 2014.

    We them move to oral questions, which today cover Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education (PSHCE), the electoral register, Syria, Iraq and student demonstrations in Burma.

    Questions will be followed by three debates on committee reports about the Inquiries Act 2005, the European Prosecutor's Office and STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) students.

    The last item of business will be the committee stage of the Health Service Commission for England (Complaint Handling) Bill - a private members' bill which addresses how complaints concerning the NHS are handled.

  69. 'Worst assessment ever seen'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Andy Burnham says the problems at Whipps Cross hospital have been known about for some time.

    He describes the report as "the worst assessment ever seen from the CQC" and asks what is being done to improve the management of the hospital.

    Andy Burnham
  70. Post update

    @politicshome

    PoliticsHome ‏tweets: Andy Burnham says Whipps Cross/Barts failures "will be seen as a decline of the NHS on this government's watch"

  71. Concerns expressed by CQC

    The Care Quality Commission found a culture of bullying and low morale among staff at Whipps Cross Hospital, part of Barts Health NHS Trust, which runs six hospitals across east London, and raised issues in patient safety.

    The CQC report on Whipps Cross University Hospital in Leytonstone raised a number of serious concerns including:

    • Insufficient staffing levels to provide safe care, high use of agency staff and low staff morale
    • A persisting culture of bullying and harassment
    • Bed occupancy that is too high
    • A failure to meet national waiting time targets
  72. Special measures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jane Ellison tells MPs that a hospital placed in special measures will remain there "until it reaches the quality standards that patients rightly expect".

    The Care Quality Commission will re-inspect the hospital after 12 months in special measures, she adds.

  73. Barts urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham asks the urgent question on Barts Health NHS Trust.

    Health Minister Jane Ellison is responding in place of the health secretary.

  74. Topical questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The list of questions on the order paper today has been dealt with and MPs are now putting topical questions to energy and climate change ministers.

    Commons oral questions are tabled by MPs at least three days in advance of question time.

    You can read more at parliament.uk.

  75. Post update

    ‏@AnneMcIntoshMP

    Conservative MP Anne McIntosh tweets: Minister Matt Hancock states any fracking application before July regs published to be treated as though protections for Nat Parks etc exist

  76. Longannet power station

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow energy and climate change minister Tom Greatrex says the threatened closure of Longannet power station jeopardises "hundreds of highly skilled jobs".

    He also says the power station in Fife has "kept our lights on".

    Energy and Climate Change Minister Matthew Hancock says plans will be put in place to make sure energy supplies are secure.

    The coal-burning power station in Fife faces closure within a year unless it wins an auction to provide back-up supply.

    longannet
    Image caption: Longannet operator ScottishPower has warned the facility could close next year
  77. Post update

    @labourenergy

    Labour Energy ‏tweets: Energy bills £300 higher, 3/4 households overcharged + 1 million families w/ kids who can't afford bills says @CarolineFlintMP #deccorals

  78. Picture: House of Commons Chamber

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons
  79. Questions begin

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Kelvin Hopkins asks the first question to energy and climate change ministers, on what is being done to help households improve their energy efficiency.

  80. Also in the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After Leader of the House William Hague has announced the forthcoming Commons business, MPs will resume their debate on the Budget.

    Finally, Labour MP Robert Flello will lead an adjournment debate on the Shooter's Hill mobile phone mast in Stoke-on-Trent.

  81. Good morning

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Welcome to our live coverage of today in Parliament.

    The House of Commons meets in a few minutes' time and the day begins with energy and climate change questions.

    Then, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt will answer an urgent question on Barts Hospital being placed in special measures.

    After that, there is a ministerial statement on fiscal responsibility.