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Summary

  1. MPs and peers met at 14.30 GMT. MPs began with Home Office questions, followed by a statement from the prime minister on the recent European Council summit.
  2. Minister for the Cabinet Office Francis Maude then made a statement on government efficiency and reform.
  3. Former health minister Paul Burstow had a ten minute rule bill on tobacco manufacturers producer responsibility.
  4. The main business of the day was the conclusion of the Budget debate, focusing on jobs, pensions and savings.
  5. In the Lords, after oral questions and consideration of the House of Commons Commission Bill, peers turned their attention to statutory instruments on terrorism.
  6. There was also a debate on gaming machines, focusing on fixed-odds betting terminals.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight

    And that concludes today's business in the Houses of Parliament.

    MPs will be back at 11.30 GMT tomorrow for questions to Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg.

    Peers will return at at 14.30 TM for a series of debate son select committee reports.

  2. 'Genocide' a crime

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Foreign Office Minister David Lidington replies that the government only recognise those events which have been designated a genocide "by international courts".

    The government "take the view that genocide is not simply an expression of a political judgement, genocide is a crime" he tells MPs.

  3. Recognising the genocide

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP John Whittingdale is now on his feet to support Stephen Pounds call for an official recognition of the killing of 1.5m Armenians as a genocide.

    The Massacre was one of the "first great crimes of the 20th century" he adds.

  4. What happened in the Armenian Genocide?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Between 1915 and 1917 an estimated 1.5 million Armenians were killed by the Ottoman Empire.

    Some historians and the Armenian people believe the killings amount to genocide, while other historians and the Turks deny that the killings were orchestrated - instead claiming the Armenians killed were victims of World War One.

    Countries including France, Sweden and America formally acknowledge the killings as a "genocide".

  5. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn to the last of today's business, the adjournment debate. Tonight on the Centenary of the 1915 Armenian Genocide led by Labour's Stephen Pound.

    Stephen Pound
    Image caption: Stephen Pound
  6. Budget passed by MPs

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs agree to the government's new corporation tax plans by 337 votes to 240, a government majority of 97. The rest of the budgets proposals are then agreed to en bloc.

  7. Budget changes passed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have agreed to the change the law to and introduce the changes George Osborne set out in last week's budget by 334 votes to 250, a government majority 84.

    A separate motion is needed to introduce Mr Osborne's changes to income tax thresholds, which in turn requires another vote. MPs once again file out of the chamber to vote division lobbies. Results are expected at 22.30 GMT.

  8. Two party budget

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Danny Alexander reiterates that the Liberal Democrats would like to see a different approach to fiscal policy but tells MPs that his budget has the blessing of both coalition parties.

    This budget "reflects the hard work the coalition has carried out over the last five years to turn around the mess we inherited from the previous Labour administration."

  9. Government response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Danny Alexander

    Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander is now responding to the debate for the Government.

  10. 'One and a half budgets'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Danny Alexander

    Referring to Danny Alexander's alternative Liberal Democrat budget Chris Leslie says "we've had one and half budgets in two days from two parties that have noting to offer the majority of people in this country."

    Both budgets were based on "party political interests and there perceived electoral advantage" he complains.

  11. Picture: Chris Leslie, Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chirs Leslie
  12. 'Smuggery and spin'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MP Mark Durkan dismisses the budget as full of "smuggery and spin" and accuses he Chancellor of claiming "circumstantial credit for low commodity prices and low inflation."

  13. 'The dog that didn't bark'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Gisela Stuart

    Labour's Gisela Stuart wants to talk about the "dog that didn't bark" in the Budget: the NHS.

    The Conservatives are "trying to pretend everything is fine and things are working" she suggests, but the truth is problems are building up "even in the best areas" she argues.

    The NHS needs a Labour party in government after the next election as "the dismantling of the state structures will become worse if there is a Toy government again" she adds.

  14. Austerity 'hasn't worked'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Eilidh Whiteford welcomes "the fact that the economy is recovering" but argues that the government's economic decisions led to "slowest recovery in history"

    The "austerity programme simply hasn't worked the way he led us to expect" she tells MPs, adding "if it's failed in economic terms its been a disaster for people. Specifically people at the bottom half of the income spectrum."

  15. 'Work to be done'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP for Stafford, Jeremy Le Froy, brings things down to the local level telling MPs that the number of people claiming job seekers allowance in his constituency has fallen to its lowest level since records began; partially down to increased confidence in the economy, leading to greater investment

    He admits, though, there is "still work to be done": through improving careers guidance and advice, increasing apprenticeships, increasing investment in infrastructure and improving productivity.

  16. Goodnight from the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers will return tomorrow from 14.30 GMT for questions to the government.

    Tomorrow's debates are on topics including a report on the EU and Russia; and sports volunteering.

    Stay with us tonight though, as MPs continue their debate on the Budget.

  17. Motion withdrawn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokeswoman Baroness Jolly urges Lord Collins to withdraw his amendment which "regrets" that the gaming machine regulations "do not appropriately address the problems of gambling addiction".

    Lord Collins agrees to withdraw the motion "in the light of the comments made".

    That brings to an end today's debates in the Lords.

  18. About this order

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The order opposed by Lord Collins amends the Gaming Machine (Circumstances of Use) Regulations, which are "designed to ensure appropriate and proportionate safeguards for gaming machine players".

    It introduces a new requirement in relation to gaming machines in the sub-Category B2 in premises other than a casino.

    This new requirement prevents individuals paying in excess of £50 for a single charge for use in respect of sub-Category B2 gaming machine content unless certain conditions are satisfied.

    There are four categories of gaming machines, A-D, and 5 sub-categories. The maximum stake for sub-Category B2 gaming machine content is £100.

    The regulations apply to England, Scotland and Wales.

  19. Financial crisis response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Blunkett

    Former Home Secretary David Blunkett opens his speech by paying tribute to Gordon Brown and Alistair Darling's response to the financial crisis.

    During the financial crisis he never thought "the absurdity would exist where the last Labour government was blamed for the collapse of the sub-prime mortgage market in America".

    Turning to this year's Budget, he tells MPs he "cannot and will not allow" a doubling of the cuts to public services and a "doubling of the pain in the next Parliament", which he says will "take us backwards".

  20. 'Planning permission' requirement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Collins says that Labour would require a firm wanting to open a betting shop to "seek planning permission if they wish to open in a premise that was not a former betting shop".

    The party also proposes more powers for local authorities to regulate the growth of betting shops in their area.

    He is particularly concerned about the growth of fixed-odds betting terminals, or FOBTs, which he claims are "a threat to our communities".

    Lord Collins of Highbury
  21. Impact on the economy

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Alistair Darling

    Another former Chancellor, Alistair Darling, is now on his feet making his final speech in the House of Commons.

    To laughter form the Labour benches he highlights part of the Office of Budgetary Responsibility's report on the Budget, which found that it "is not expected to have any material impact on the economy".

    "I thought that was what Budgets are for," he says.

    The economy was growing in 2010 "because of the measures we put in place in 2008 and 2009 to stop a recession becoming a depression", whereas the government's interventions have only led to the economy "slowing down" meaning increased borrowing, he says.

  22. Final debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The final debate tonight concerns the Gaming Machine (Circumstances of Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2015.

    Labour spokesman Lord Collins of Highbury has tabled a motion opposing the regulations.

    The Labour motion argues that the regulations "do not appropriately address the problems of gambling addiction, and offer no significant protections for vulnerable people from getting into debt".

  23. Orders approved

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers approve the series of regulations, including one creating a civil penalty regime if a carrier fails to provide police with information about passengers.

    The regulation sets out a civil penalty scheme and sets out the right of air carriers to appeal a penalty.

    Peers are also debating amendments which clarify the legal basis for the examination of goods outside the immediate boundary of a port.

    There is also a code of practice for officers exercising functions under powers to seize travel documents if there is suspicion of terrorist activity.

  24. No 'gimmicky' Budget

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Chancellor Ken Clarke welcomes the George Osborne's decision not to deliver a "gimmicky" Budget.

    "We haven't had foolish attempts to start buying votes with populist measures," he says.

    "The public are far more sensible than most of the journalists and most of the politicians" and can't be bought off, he tells MPs.

  25. 'Fitting epitaph'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rachel Reeves reckons last week's Budget will provide a "fitting epitaph" for the government.

    Under spending reductions announced in the Budget, there will have to be an estimated £12bn cut to social security over the next three years under, she tells MPs.

    She argues that this can only come at the cost of "unimaginable hardship on low-paid workers, children in poverty, disabled people or carers".

  26. About statutory instruments

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are debating statutory instruments that allow ministers to alter an act of Parliament without introducing a whole new bill.

    Statutory instruments are laid before Parliament in the form of draft orders or regulations.

    Peers are debating a group of seven draft orders which variously amend the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015, the Terrorism Act 2000 and the Aviation Security Act 1982.

  27. 'Wasted opportunity'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rachel Reeves

    Perhaps unsurprisingly, shadow work and pensions secretary Rachel Reeves takes a different view.

    Under this government the number of children in absolute poverty has been increased by 500,000, she tells MPs.

    The welfare reforms have conspired to "take money from the poorest", disabled people and working families while delivering only "write off and delays", she adds.

    She calls the Budget a "wasted opportunity", which shows that "all we expect from this government is more of the same."

  28. Clerk of the House of Commons

    "The Queen has been pleased to approve that Mr David Natzler be appointed Under Clerk of the Parliaments (Clerk of the House of Commons)."

    What does that mean? And who is David Natzler? Read more about the role and Mr Natzler here on the gov.uk website.

  29. 'Fit for the 21st century'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Iain Duncan Smith argues he has "ensured it pays to work by undertaking the most significant reforms [to the welfare system] in living memory" despite reform being "opposed at every turn by the opposition".

    This government has inherited a "bloated and unfair " system that "penalised those who tried" and trapped so many dependents but has now left it "fit for the 21st century".

    This is a legacy that a "government of any stripe" should be proud of, and this budget is "a key to that legacy", he concludes.

  30. Post update

    @CommonsHansard

    Commons Hansard ‏tweets: The Official Report of questions to the Home Secretary is now online

  31. 'Target for terrorists'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Opening the debate, Home Office Minister Lord Bates tells the House: "International aviation remains a target for terrorists."

    The regulations before the House include a civil penalty regime if a carrier breaches the Authority to Carry Scheme.

    The scheme may be breached if a carrier fails to provide the required passenger and crew information.

    It may also be breached if the carrier fails to seek authority to carry a person to or from the UK, or carries a person after being refused authority.

  32. 'Authority to carry'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers resume their debate on counter-terrorism regulations.

    The groups of orders for debate includes the Draft Authority to Carry Scheme (Civil Penalties) Regulations 2015.

    The Authority to Carry Scheme is intended to disrupt individuals who pose a terrorism-related threat from exit from, or entry to, the UK.

  33. 'Remarkable' labour market

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Iain Duncan Smith

    Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith is opening the debate for the government.

    He begins, as many speeches by the government front bench do, by telling MPs that "at the start of this parliament we inherited an economy that had suffered a greater collapse than perhaps any other country".

    The economy has now "grown faster than any other major advanced economy" and this has been down to the "remarkable performance of our labour market", he tells MPs.

  34. Post update

    @timsculthorpe

    PA's Parliamentary Editor Tim Sculthorpe tweets: Iain Duncan Smith and Rachel Reeves kick off the budget today. Darling and Clarke present for debate - neither have spoken yet.

  35. Bill passed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Despite Mr Davies' protestations the bill is passed without the need for a division.

    MPs now turn to today's main debate on the last weeks budgets impact on jobs, pensions and savings.

  36. Tobacco fair share

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In an unusual step, Conservative Philip Davies stands to speak against the motion, which he calls a "typical Lib Dem populist approach to try and attack the tobacco industry without any evidence whatsoever."

    He argues that the tobacco industry already pays its "fair share" given the cost to smoking to the NHS is £2.7bn, while tobacco raises £12bn through taxes for the Treasury.

  37. European Council statement repeat

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers approve the orders on communications data.

    Leader of the House Baroness Stowell is repeating the prime minister's statement on the European Council.

    David Cameron made the statement to MPs earlier to update them on the meeting of EU leaders held last week.

    Baroness Stowell
  38. Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lib Dem former health minister, Paul Burstow, is now on his feet setting out his ten minute rule bill on Tobacco Manufacturers Producer Responsibility.

    A consultation on a tobacco levy was announced by the Chancellor, George Osborne, in the 2014 Autumn Statement, and this is part of a cross-party campaign to direct the money - perhaps as much as £500m - to pay for a programme of tobacco control measures including Stop Smoking Services currently funded by local councils.

    The bill's supporters view it as an important way of boosting funding for preventive health measures.

    Cigarette
  39. 'Growing parliamentary scandals'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Paul Flynn asks why there have been no reforms of the "growing parliamentary scandals" of cash for access, cash for peerages and the fact there is "no break in the revolving door that allows retiring ministers to prostitute their insider knowledge to the highest bidders".

    "Is he ashamed of himself that the reputation of politics still remains firmly in gutter?" Mr Flynn asks.

  40. Post update

    ‏@ChukaUmunna

    Shadow business secretary Chuka Umunna tweets: Last week of business this Parliament - voting tonight, and on Wednesday afternoon and evening, on the 2015 Budget...

  41. Improved productivity

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Francis Maude claims that productivity in the civil service has "improved dramatically".

    "Like for like, the civil service is 21% smaller but no one would say its doing less," he argues.

  42. Criminal justice reform savings

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat MP Sir Alan Beith suggests there is more money to be saved by "reforming the criminal justice system".

    "Having the highest prison population of almost any European country is not the most cost effective way of keeping people safe," he says.

    The "sole reason" the prison population is so high is the high rate of reoffending in the UK, Sir Francis Maude replies.

    The government is aiming to tackle this through the "rehabilitation revolution" in the Ministry of Justice and "committed to radically reducing that rate of reoffending."

  43. Post update

    @nigelfletcher

    Conservative Nigel Fletcher tweets: "I'm very sorry that the Hon. Lady has been so mean-minded" replies Maude, accusing @LucyMPowell of an "unworthy" response. Quite right.

  44. 'Empty statement'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow minister for the Cabinet Office Lucy Powell isn't impressed. "One has to wonder why it is I keep being called to this House" for these "empty statements", she says.

    She suggests that Francis Maude is trying to "distract me and this House from the disarray that is now besetting the Conservative party's campaign" or that he is trying to "scrub up his CV" and gain a place in the House of Lords.

    The time taken up by today's statement could have been better spent "deploring the despicable actions of the Tory candidate for Dudley North" or explaining "where the axe will fall in the next parliament" following the cuts announced in last weeks budget, she says.

  45. Qualified support?

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour home affairs spokesman Lord Rosser asks whether the code of practice on the retention of communications data applies "to messages sent via social media platforms".

    He asks if it extends to tagging someone in a Facebook or Instagram account or mentioning someone in a tweet.

    Despite these questions, he says Labour supports the orders.

    Lord Rosser
  46. What does Minister for the Cabinet Office do?

    The Minister for the Cabinet Office has overall responsibility for the policy and work of the department.

    Responsibilities include:

    • public sector efficiency and reform
    • civil service issues
    • industrial relations strategy in the public sector
    • government transparency
    • civil contingencies
    • civil society
    • cyber security
    • UK statistics

    More about this role on the gov.uk website.

  47. 'Next steps'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Francis Maude announces the government's "next steps".

    He tells MPs there will be a new approach to government owned land and property "based on central ownership" which will introduce "market level rents" and provide greater incentives for departments to "rationalise their space".

    Central government will also roll out the increased use of digital services, which are "significantly cheaper to provide", to local government and reduce the cost of technology in government.

    This will also include a new "joint venture for data hosting" to save an additional £100m, he says.

  48. About the orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The first of the two orders, which are being debated together, has the long-winded title of the Draft Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Acquisition and Disclosure of Communications Data: Code of Practice) Order 2015.

    It brings into force a revised code of practice which sets out guidance relating to the acquisition and disclosure of communications data by public authorities.

    Peers are also considering the Draft Retention of Communications Data (Code of Practice) Order 2015.

    This brings into force a code of practice setting out guidance on the retention of data by communications service providers.

  49. Government savings

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The government have achieved "unprecedented levels of savings" since taking over in 2010, saving "£3.75bn, £5.5bn and £10bn in successive years compared with Labour," Francis Maude says.

    Part of the famous "long-term economic plan" was to save £20bn though government efficiency and reform in the last year of this parliament, and the government are "on course to exceed this target".

  50. Government efficiency statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General Francis Maude is now at the despatch box delivering a statement on government efficiency and reform.

  51. Lessons from Greece

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Simon Kirby gets to his feet to argue that Greece "teaches us that you can only have a strong public sector if you have a strong economy".

    David Cameron says Mr Kirby is "absolutely right".

  52. Regulations approved

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers approve the regulations on the risk of being drawn into terrorism.

    The next set of regulations concern the acquisition, disclosure and retention of communications data by public authorities.

  53. Scottish EU referendum

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Pete Wishart asks what happens if the UK votes to leave and Scotland votes to remain part of the European Union. Will Scottish people have to "put up with being yanked out [of Europe] against their will?" he asks.

    Mr Wishart suggests "all of the UK's siblings" should agree on what will happen before any referendum.

    David Cameron says the SNP lost their last referendum and "they'll lose the next one".

  54. 'Weakness and vacillation'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Barry Sheerman says "pro-European" MPs and their allies all want to see "a strong Britain in a strong and "reformed Europe" but they are not in favour of "weakness and vacillation" while manufacturers and exporters spend the "next three years waiting for a referendum".

    David Cameron says Mr Sheerman should support the Conservatives' pledge then, as the official Labour position is that Brussels "does not have too many powers".

  55. 'Same Prevent duty'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates is replying to the short debate on the first of today's counter-terrorism regulations, which adds Scottish "specified authorities" to those covered by the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act.

    "Universities in Scotland will be under the same Prevent duty in law as universities in England and Wales," he says.

    The duty extends to "non-violent extremism", he adds.

    Lord Bates
  56. TTIP 'scaremongering'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron complains that there has been an "awful lot of scaremongering" about the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership - also known as T-TIP.

    Public services "are always exempted" from these deals, and the future of the NHS will be decided by domestic policy. "All of us who support free trade who want to see Britain as an international success" should back the agreement, he says.

  57. Conservative backbenchers

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative benches
    Image caption: Conservative MPs listen as the prime minister answers Sir Bill Cash's question
  58. Greek woes

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Labour Cabinet Minister Peter Hain warns against "strangling" Greece with further austerity.

    "Repeating the same dose of austerity will not achieve the objective any more than the last one did" and is "not going to revive the Greek economy or allow it to repay their debt", he tells MPs.

    David Cameron says he "doesn't entirely disagree" with Mr Hain but as the UK didn't lend money as part of the bailout they are "not in the position" to dictate terms.

  59. What powers?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the European Scrutiny Committee Sir William Cash wants more details on exactly what powers will be returned to "the British people" to "return the sovereignty to this Parliament".

    David Cameron says that he has been clear in wanting more powers over the "free movement of people" especially in relation to their ability to claim welfare benefits. Labour by contrast would do "absolutely zip", he says.

  60. Labour and Prevent

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Shadow home affairs spokeswoman Baroness Smith of Basildon says the last Labour government introduced the Prevent strategy "to respond to the ideological challenge of terrorism and to the threat we face from those who encourage and promote terrorism".

    Ministers also wished to provide "help and advice" for people at risk of being drawn into terrorism, she adds.

    Baroness Smith of Basildon
  61. Post update

    ‏@ayestotheright

    Journalist Tony Grew tweets: Cam and Ed M comparing each other to Tom Cruise. This place, honestly sometimes ...

  62. Labour response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to the prime minister, Labour leader Ed Miliband criticises the lack of debate around the Israeli elections.

    The ongoing conflict in the Ukraine shows that the security dimension of the EU "is "more and more and more important, demands command action resolve and a clear commitment to our place in the European Union" which he says the prime minister "is incapable of delivering".

    He asks for more details on the "non-negotiable reforms for treaty change", suggesting there is "no strategy for achieving change".

    David Cameron "can't even tell us if he will vote yes or no in a referendum". He is a "weak prime minister", Mr Miliband concludes.

  63. Reforming the EU

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron says Britain has managed to negotiate the first cut to the EU budget in its history and repatriate "more than 100" powers to the UK.

    "In the coming two years we have the opportunity to reform the European Union and fundamentally change Britain's relationship with it to build an EU that is more competitive, flexible and accountable to the people," he adds.

    Bringing his remarks to close he says if he is prime minister the UK will get an "in-out referendum". Those who refuse to "give the British people their say should have to explain themselves", he says.

  64. Greek bailout

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron says the Council welcomes progress made on the talks on the bailout of the Greek economy.

    "Britain is not in the Eurozone and we're not going to join the Eurozone but we do need the Eurozone to work properly," he tells MPs.

  65. New Clerk

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons
    Image caption: The new appointment - Clerk of the House David Natzler, seated just below John Bercow - acknowledges the approval of the House of Commons with an infinitesimal smile
  66. European Council statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Prime Minister David Cameron is now at the despatch box updating the House on the outcome of the latest European Council summit.

  67. Post update

    @roxley

    Campaign Director of Business for Britain Robert Oxley ‏tweets: Little dig from Cameron to Bercow "you want to the ends of the earth to find the best candidate but I'm glad we found them right here"

  68. New Clerk of the House

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Bercow announces that David Natzler, the current acting Clerk of the House of Commons, will be take over the role full time in the next Parliament.

    The previous incumbent was Sir Robert Rogers, who took early retirement last year.

  69. Prevent co-ordinators

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbencher Lord Hannay of Chiswick calls for Prevent co-ordinators to have training in "how universities work".

    The Prevent strategy recommends the appointment of regional co-ordinators to work at a local level.

  70. 'Chilling effect'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Baroness Lister of Burtersett says she is concerned about a possible "chilling effect" of the counter-terrorism regulations on academic debate.

    She tells the House that she is "not convinced that the guidance as it stands is sufficiently robust to guard against such a chilling effect".

  71. 20,000 police job losses

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Yvette Cooper

    Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper tells MPs that cuts announced in last week's Budget mean the loss of "20,000 more police officers" at a time "when the terror threat is growing and more child abuse cases are coming up."

    Theresa May says that Ms Cooper knows "full well that the funding for counter terrorism policing has been protected and this government is putting more money in dealing with child sexual exploitation."

    The forthcoming cuts are because the "last Labour government left us with the worst budget deficit in post war history," she says.

  72. Prevent strategy: Is it failing to stop radicalisation?

    Frank Gardner

    BBC security correspondent

    A key part of the government's counter-terrorism strategy is called Prevent.

    It is a programme aimed at stopping more people getting drawn towards violent extremism.

    But, the BBC's Frank Gardner asks, is it failing?

    Islamic State militants on the Iraq-Syria border
    Image caption: Several people in the UK have been prevented from going to Syria, where Islamic State militants are active
  73. Lancashire figures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP for Ribble Valley, Nigel Evans, questions Rosie Cooper's figures. He tells MPs that crime in Lancashire has gone down by 19% since 2011, while anti-social behaviour is down 35.8% and robbery is down 47%.

    These are "remarkable figures", he says, and praises the work of Lancashire constabulary.

  74. 'Apology' over police cuts

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Rosie Cooper says the home secretary "should apologise" for "failing to honour the promise to protect front line police services."

    She complains that West Lancashire police force are at "breaking point" after losing 700 posts and 11 police station due to £16m cuts. "Burglary, theft and violence are on the rise," she says.

    Home Office Minister Mike Penning says their is "no question the police will have the resources to do their important job" but they will have to do this while "balancing their books."

  75. About the regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 states that "specified authorities" such as local authorities, schools, universities, the health sector and the police should be aware of the need to prevent people being drawn into terrorism.

    The specified authorities in England and Wales are already listed in the act. These regulations amend the act to add the equivalent Scottish bodies.

    The regulations also amend the act to add Scottish local authorities to those who have to ensure panels are in place to provide support to people who are vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism.

  76. Counter-terrorism regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    After dealing briefly with orders and regulations, peers pass the House of Commons Commission Bill without debate.

    The debate on counter-terrorism regulations begins with consideration of measures which aim to prevent people being "drawn into terrorism".

  77. Legal highs ban 'on the shelf'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lynne Featherstone tells MPs that plans to completely ban legal highs, or "lethal highs" as Ms Featherstone refers to them, will not now be implemented until the next parliament, but plans are "on the shelf ready for the new government".

  78. 'Bridge of understanding'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Watson argues that an increase in Russian-language broadcasting by the BBC World Service would help to build a "bridge of understanding" between the UK and Russia.

    This would include speaking directly to the Russian people about the situation in Ukraine, he adds.

    Lord Watson of Richmond
  79. Final question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The fourth question asks what discussions the government has had with the BBC about increasing the corporation's Russian language programming and distribution, including via the internet.

    Lib Dem peer Lord Watson of Richmond has tabled this final question.

    Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay says the decision would be an "operational" one for the BBC.

  80. 'Very different view'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Affairs Minister Diana Johnson tells MPs that today's announcement is simply a return to the policies that the government inherited from the previous Labour administration. "We're back to where we started," she says, so "why the rollercoaster in such an important area in this country?"

    Theresa May goes on the attack. These are new announcements and the government is "not going back to where we were", she says.

    When she inherited the Home Office, she had found "the last Labour government was funding extremist organisation" while "members of the Labour party were standing on platforms embracing extremist hate preachers."

    "This government takes a very different view," she says.

    Theresa May
  81. Third question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The third question comes from Conservative peer Lord Balfe.

    He asks what the government is doing to support the main aims of the Turkish Presidency of the G20 in 2015.

  82. Peers and voting

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords Act 1999 set it in law that being a member of the second chamber prevents life peers from voting in general elections.

    Members of the Lords can vote in all other elections, such as local and European elections.

  83. 'Offensive'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Dubs says he cannot believe that Lord Wallace is "saying something that he really believes in".

    He claims that it is "offensive" that peers do not have the vote.

    Lord Wallace says there are other rules around general elections that are a matter of tradition, such as votes for Commonwealth and Irish citizens.

    Lord Wallace of Saltaire
    Image caption: Lord Wallace of Saltaire responds on behalf of the government
  84. Anti-radicalisation proposals welcomed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Council for Arab-British Understanding, and Conservative MP, Crispin Blunt, welcomes Theresa May's new proposals on tackling radicalisation and extremism.

    He asks her to "continue to proceed calmly and on the basis of the evidence" given that UK has a "press prone to hysterics and the capacity to achieve the objective of the enemies of our society by sowing fear and anxiety where none need exist."

  85. De-radicalisation numbers

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In response to a question from Labour's Jim Cunningham, Theresa May tells MPs that over 2,000 people have gone through the Channel de-radicalisation since it was set up in 2010, while "hundreds more have been offered support".

  86. Votes for peers question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Naseby asks if there are plans to review the exclusion of life peers from voting at general elections.

    Cabinet Office Minister Lord Wallace of Saltaire tells him there are no such plans.

  87. Analysis: Theresa May's speech

    Norman Smith

    BBC Assistant Political Editor

    Theresa May wants to throw down a challenge to minority communities to clearly and explicitly disown extremists. She wants them to more publically and vocally express their support for British values.

    For those on the other side of the line, the new measures she's proposing seem pretty tough.

    Barring people from speaking in public, shutting down bookshops and reviewing Sharia courts. I imagine there will be quite a tussle to get these measures in force and working - Mrs May hasn't been able to so far, while in a coalition with the Lib Dems.

    She would argue that she's protecting British values, but others would say she's actually trampling on many of them - such as that of free speech - with these very measures.

    You can find out more about Mrs May's speech earlier today here.

  88. Post update

    @JackDromeyMP

    Labour MP Jack Dromey tweets: With Theresa May in office, the police service has lost 16,701 police officers. That's almost 10 police officers per day #MaysMayhem

  89. Post update

    ‏@steve_hawkes

    The Sun's Steve Hawkes tweets: Labour now asking Theresa May to say sorry for breaking her promise on immigration. Quite incredible given what happened pre 2010

  90. 'Tightened up'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Secretary Theresa May responds by telling MPs government's policies are working where it "can implement policies".

    The government have clamped down on "860 bogus colleges" that were offering fraudulent student visas and has "tightened up every route into the United Kingdom", she says.

    "Without our efforts net migration would have been far higher," she adds.

  91. Questions begin

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Tonge has tabled the first question in the Lords today, asking what discussions ministers have had with the government of Israel about lifting the blockade of Gaza.

  92. Migration target

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Alex Cunningham has the first question in the House of Commons asking for clarification on the government's policy on the net migration target.

    Net migration to the UK has risen to 298,000, according to the final set of figures before the election. The Tories, who had promised to get it to below 100,000, said the figures were "disappointing" and blamed a rise in EU migration - and Lib Dem "constraints".

  93. Also in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Also in the Lords today, leader of the House Baroness Stowell will repeat the prime minister's statement on the European Council, for the benefit of peers.

    The final debate is on the regulation of gaming machines.

    Labour's Lord Collins of Highbury has tabled a motion opposing the regulations, claiming that they "do not appropriately address the problems of gambling addiction, and offer no significant protections for vulnerable people from getting into debt".

  94. What else is going on today?

    Peter Robinson

    First Minister Peter Robinson is currently taking questions on the floor of the Northern Ireland Assembly, on matters ranging from the Equality Commission to the Stormont House Agreement and the Irish language. You can watch it on the Stormont Live page.

    And there's full coverage of the countdown to the general election from our colleagues on the politics team: follow today's news on the Campaign Countdown page.

  95. Today in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords will meet shortly for oral questions to ministers.

    Peers will deal briefly with the House of Commons Commission Bill, which concerns the body responsible for the administration and services of the House of Commons.

    The main business today consists of a series of counter-terrorism regulations.

    These include an amendment to provisions in the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 requiring local authorities, the police and other bodies to be aware of the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism.

  96. Commons business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Then the Liberal Democrat former health minister, Paul Burstow, will launch a ten minute rule bill on Tobacco Manufacturers Producer Responsibility.

    A consultation on a tobacco levy was announced by the Chancellor, George Osborne, in the 2014 Autumn Statement, and this is part of a cross-party campaign to direct the money - perhaps as much as £500m - to pay for a programme of tobacco control measures including Stop Smoking Services currently funded by local councils. The bill's supporters view it as an important way of boosting funding for preventive health measures.

    MPs will move on to the final stage of the Budget debate - where the chosen theme is jobs, pensions and savings - which suggests the Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, will be facing Labour's Rachel Reeves.

    And the day will end with an adjournment debate on the centenary of the 1915 Armenian Genocide - led by Labour MP Stephen Pound.

  97. Good afternoon

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our rolling coverage of today's events in the Houses of Parliament as they happen.

    The Commons meets at 14.30 GMT for Home Office questions, where Home Secretary Theresa May will set out some of the details of her new proposals to tackle extremism.

    Following this Prime Minister David Cameron will make a statement on the outcome of the latest European Council.

    Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General Francis Maude will then deliver a statement on government efficiency and reform.

    Details on the statement are still sketchy but Mr Maude recently told the TechUK's Public Services 2030 Conference that building efficient government digital services is a civic infrastructure project as important as building the National Grid or the Victorians constructing sewers under London.