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Summary

  1. The Commons began at 09.30 GMT with questions to the Business ministerial team.
  2. There were three urgent questions scheduled for today - on undercover policing, on the Penrose inquiry and on changes to today's business.
  3. A bid to change the way the Speaker is elected was defeated amid emotional scenes, following an urgent question where William Hague was accused of springing the debate on Parliament
  4. The main business of the day was a series of valedictory speeches from departing MPs, arranged by the backbench business committee.
  5. The Lords met at 11.00 GMT for questions to ministers, after which peers considered the Finance Bill, passed yesterday by the Commons.
  6. Two of today's Commons urgent questions were repeated as statements and peers held a debate on immigration detention in the UK.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodbye...for now

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Bercow and Robin Fell

    Speaker John Bercow, who narrowly survived a tactical vote of confidence today, shakes hands with the retiring principle doorkeeper Robin Fell.

    And that brings to an end the 55th Parliament.

    We hope to see you again for the 56th Parliament following the May General Election - in whatever form it may take.

  2. Picture: exchanging pleasantries?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hague and Bercow
    Image caption: Perhaps Mr Speaker is wishing William Hague a happy birthday - he is 54 years old today
  3. Hand shakes

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now ceremonially shaking hands with the Speaker: for many retiring MPs their last action in the House of Commons.

  4. 'Queen's speech' revisited

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Bercow reads the "Queen's speech" for the benefit of any MPs who didn't attend the House of Lords.

    Once the speech is finished Mr Speaker traditionally shakes hands with remaining MPs, which today includes Leader of the House William Hague.

    John Bercow
  5. Commons speech

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Bercow

    The announcement is made to both Houses and the Speaker of the House of Commons and MPs are now filing back to the Commons to hear the same announcement read out by Mr Speaker, John Bercow.

  6. Prorogued until dissolution

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Stowell announces that Parliament will be prorogued until Monday, which is the day of the dissolution of the Parliament elected in 2010.

    After that, there will be officially no more MPs, just general election candidates.

  7. Post update

    @timsculthorpe

    PA's Parliamentary Editor Tim Sculthorpe ‏tweets: That's all folks. Bercow will see MPs off in the Commons then it's all election, all the time.

  8. Her Majesty's speech

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Leader of the Lords, Conservative peer Baroness Stowell of Beeston, reads the Queen's speech, "in Her Majesty's own words" signalling the prorogation of parliament.

    However, it begins with mention of "a long-term plan to build a stronger economy and a fairer society", which sounds more like the words of the coalition's front bench.

    The announcement sets out the major bills passed during the 2014-15 session and also describes other significant measures taken by the government.

    Baroness Stowell of Beeston
  9. 'La Reine le veult'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Clerk of the Parliaments David Beamish
    Image caption: The Clerk of the Parliaments David Beamish announces Royal assent of bills passed in the parliament using the Norman French phrase "La Reine le veult" - the Queen desires it
  10. Post update

    ‏@cripeswatson

    Sean Curran

    Parliamentary correspondent, BBC News

    The mobile phone going off a daringly 21st century addition to ancient ceremony of prorogation @bbcdemlive

  11. Post update

    ‏@ayestotheright

    Journalist Tony Grew tweets: Norman French time #prorogation

  12. Royal assent

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    And so the process of granting royal assent to various bills begins.

    Royal assent is the Queen's formal agreement to make a bill into an Act of Parliament.

  13. Prorogation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Clerk of the Parliament David Beamish is signalling the prorogation of parliament by an announcement, read in the House of Lords, of the bills in this parliament.

  14. Post update

    @cripeswatson

    Sean Curran

    Parliamentary correspondent, BBC News

    If you're watching prorogation on BBC Parliament ( @bbcdemlive ) look out for when MPs return to HoC for final handshake w Speaker

  15. Black Rod in the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Black Rod

    Black Rod, the ceremonial head of security in the House of Lords, is sent to the House of Commons to retrieve MPs.

    Traditionally the door to the Commons is slammed in Black Rod's face as a display of the independence of the Commons from the Lords, and Black Rod must knock on the Door with his ebony mace - or black rod - to and ask to enter the Commons.

  16. MPs file out

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs file out of the Commons chamber to join peers in the House of Lords, having been summoned by Black Rod.

    MPs
  17. Royal commissioners arrive

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The royal commissioners take their places: Labour's Lord Hunt of King's Heath, Lord Speaker Baroness D'Souza, Leader of the Lords Baroness Stowell, Lib Dem Lord Newby and the convenor of the crossbench peers, Lord Laming.

    Royal commissioners
  18. What is a prorogation?

    The end of the Parliamentary session is known as prorogue, or prorogation, and it involves a few odd actions and Norman French being spoken in Westminster.

    The MPs are summoned the the House of Lords to hear the monarch's assent to various bills, which is shown by the use of the phrase, La Reine le veult - the Queen desires it - being repeated.

  19. Royal assent and prorogation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The scene is set in the Lords as peers await the arrival of royal commissioners.

    House of Lords
  20. Prorogation of Parliament

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Our live coverage of the prorogation of Parliament begins. Click the tab at the top of the page to watch the our live prorogation programme on BBC Parliament.

  21. House adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And with that the House of Commons adjourns until 17.00 GMT. Rejoin us then when our live coverage of the prorogation begins.

  22. 'Restoring the reputation of the House'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    William Hague says that given "the brilliance" of all of the retiring MPs, "it is a wonder how they will carry on without us".

    Offering future Parliaments some advice, he says that "the reputation of this House can be restored" by a display of sincerity, which he says he sees in all his colleagues from across the House.

  23. MPs standing down

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A total of 86 MPs have announced their intention to stand down, according to BBC Analysis and Research.

    That might seem like a lot, out of a total of 650 MPs.

    However, it is a long way short of the total in 2010 when 149 MPs headed for the exit in the biggest Commons clear-out in history, in the wake of the expenses scandal.

    William Hague
    Image caption: A much younger William Hague
  24. Hague's final word

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    William Hague is back at the despatch box - did he ever leave today? - responding to the debate, in what will be his last speech in the House of Commons after 25 years as an MP.

    Possibly sidestepping earlier controversies, Mr Hague says he will dedicate his speech to mentioning "one thing" about as many of the people who have spoken in this debate as possible.

  25. Happy birthday Mr Hague

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After today's high drama, shadow leader of the house Angela Eagle wishes William Hague a happy birthday, as she winds up the debate for Labour.

    "I suspect he's had rather happier birthdays than today," she says to a nodding Mr Hague.

    William Hague
  26. Post update

    @ayestotheright

    Journalist Tony Grew tweets: today is @WilliamJHague's birthday. @angelaeagle says she hopes the day gets better for him

  27. Conservatives help defeat government

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    According to the Press Association, 23 Tories and 10 Liberal Democrat MPs voted against the government, forcing it into a Commons defeat over a plan to change the procedure for re-electing the Speaker to a secret ballot when Parliament returns after the election.

  28. 'Rebalancing constituencies'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democracy MP David Heath says that when he first became an MP many of his contemporaries thought it was "quaint" that he insisted on returning to his constituency at weekends.

    He says this no longer the case "and 99% of MPs these days" work hard for their constituencies.

    However, he thinks government work is taking precedence and there needs to be a "rebalance".

  29. 'Better place'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP and former universities minister David Willetts gets to his feet to say he thinks Britain is a "better place" than when he entered the Commons in 1992.

    He says there are always problems to be solved and "our social conscience is restless".

    But he pays tribute to Conservative governments for "strengthening the economy" and says Tony Blair's government was responsible for making the country a "more and relaxed tolerant nation than in 1997".

    He concludes his remarks by saying he has "no doubt the young dynamic members of Parliament will also be making our country a better place".

  30. 'Soft spot' for Bercow

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Hamilton

    Labour MP for Midlothian since 2001, David Hamilton, had been in London only three times before he became an MP - and one of those times "there were police horses outside and I was trying to attack [the houses of parliament]."

    He tells MPs that John Bercow helped him find a boarding house when he first came to London as an MP and could not find a place to stay. "I've always had a soft spot for you since then," he tells the Speaker.

  31. Adjournment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords has now adjourned until 17:00 GMT to await the arrival of royal commissioners.

    Then, royal assent and prorogation will take place.

  32. More female staff for Yarl's Wood

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates, replying to the debate, claims "one of the issues" at Yarl's Wood has been the proportion of female detainees.

    He says it is right that the number of female staff has been increased, with ministers aiming for the proportion to reach 60%.

    Lord Bates first announced the plan to appoint more women at Yarl's Wood in February, after complaints of "inappropriate behaviour" by male staff towards female asylum seekers.

    Lord Bates
  33. Post update

    @heidi_mp

    Labour MP Heidi Alexander tweets: We've had the best & worst of the Commons today. Feel very privileged to now be listening to some great speeches from retiring colleagues.

  34. Yarl's Wood

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Smith of Basildon is making the closing speech for Labour in the immigration detention debate.

    She says she is "disappointed" with the government's response to allegations of abuse at Yarl's Wood detention centre.

    Earlier this month, two members of staff at the centre were suspended after an undercover investigation by Channel 4 News.

    The incident led to an urgent question in the Commons on 3 March.

    Secretly filmed footage by Channel 4 News inside Yarl's Wood
    Image caption: Channel 4 News secretly filmed footage inside Yarl's Wood
  35. Post update

    @timsculthorpe

    PA's Parliamentary Editor Tim Sculthorpe tweets: Just four Liberal Democrats joined 198 Tories in the aye Lobby as they slipped to a 26 vote defeat. ‏

  36. Labour MP bids farewell

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    On to Nick Raynsford, the Labour MP for Greenwich and Woolwich, who also suggests ideas for the reform of the Commons and politics in general.

    Nick Raynsford
  37. Sir John's last words

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Now Sir John Stanley, the MP for Tonbridge and Malling, has served as Conservative MP since 1974.

    He has served as a minister and on the Foreign Affairs Committee. He was also Parliamentary Private Secretary to Margaret Thatcher during her time as Leader of the Opposition.

  38. Tessa Jowell leaving

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Dame Tessa Jowell bids goodbye to the Commons.

    Labour's former culture secretary is planning to run for mayor of London in 2016.

    The MP was first elected to Parliament in 1992; and was a key figure behind the London bid for the 2012 Olympics.

    She announced in November 2013 she would stand down as an MP at the 2015 general election.

  39. 'Genuinely last resort'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Baroness Lister of Burtersett argues that "deprivation of liberty for the purpose of immigration control [should be] a genuinely last resort".

    She also argues that "women who were victims of rape and sexual violence should not be detained".

    Baroness Lister is a member of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Migration, which produced the report on immigration detention in conjunction with the All Party Parliamentary Group on Refugees.

  40. Post update

    ‏@PickardJE

    Financial Times's Jim Pickard tweets: Bercow tells Jack Straw that he "leaves this place a highly regarded figure"....

  41. Jack Straw's final words

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And now onto Jack Straw, Blackburn MP and former Labour home and foreign secretary.

    Mr Straw is currently an independent MP. He joined the Commons in 1979, and says that then, there was a greater faith in the political system than there is today.

    He draws comparisons with the situation then and now.

    He says that now Parliament is better at holding government to account; and government itself is more responsive and transparent.

    And he calls for a reform of prime minister's questions. He says "whatever purpose it served in the past, it gives a terrible impression and is rarely illuminating".

    "This is a wondrous place," he finishes.

    Mr Speaker in turn pays tribute to the retiring MP as he sits down.

  42. Farewells

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP for Eddisbury Stephen O'Brien gives his valedictory speech to the Commons.

    He says he will miss the platform - and the people in the Commons. He pays tribute to colleagues, friends in all parties and his staff in the House and his constituency.

    Mr O'Brien is taking up a job at the United Nations, in charge of humanitarian affairs and emergency relief.

  43. About valedictory speeches

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords Procedure Committee says: "We consider that a member who has formally notified his or her retirement should have the opportunity of making a valedictory speech.

    "Like maiden speeches, certain conventions should apply to valedictory speeches: they should be short (less than 10 minutes), uncontroversial and made in a debate with a speaker's list.

    "The member speaking immediately after a valedictory speech would pay tribute to the departing member, plus the front benches if they wish."

    Lord Lloyd's speech may not be considered entirely uncontroversial, as he attacks the policy of indeterminate sentences, which he says are given in some cases to prisoners "unlikely to further offend".

    He says his final wish, "at the end of my swansong", is for all political parties to commit to act on this.

  44. Resigning peer

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Lloyd makes his valedictory speech in the Lords.

    The House of Lords Reform Act 2014 gave peers the ability to resign.

    Lord Lloyd of Berwick
  45. Post update

    @ayestotheright

    Journalist Tony Grew ‏tweets: Ed Balls is on the Labour frontbench for Gordon Brown's final speech in the Commons. GB been an MP for 32 years.

  46. Brown's last stand

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown uses his last Commons appearance to tell MPs that while he is leaving the House he will "fight and fight and fight again" against the separation of the union between Scotland; and against social injustice.

    "The UK today is fragile and it is at risk," from separation, he says. "Countries at their best are more than place on a map and more than demarcations of borders."

    For the UK to lead in the world, its various parts must "work together". The best countries stand on "shared foundations" and with the wealth of the nation justly shared, he says.

    Gordon Brown
  47. Another valedictory speech

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    While retiring MPs are making their valedictory speeches over in the Commons, a retiring peer is doing the same in the Lords.

    Lord Lloyd of Berwick's opening speech in the immigration detention debate is also his valedictory speech, which he prefers to call his "swansong".

    The former law Lord tells the House, he will be 86 in May and is "beginning to feel my age".

    He adds: "I'm also afraid that my age is beginning to show and I know that because, whenever I get on to an underground train now, if it's at all crowded, I've found that men and women of all ages offer me their seat.

    "I think that would be a good test for all of us to apply."

  48. Immigration detention

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Statements are over and peers begin their final debate of the current Parliament.

    Crossbench peer Lord Lloyd of Berwick has tabled a motion to ask the government for its assessment of the report of the inquiry into the use of immigration detention in the United Kingdom, published on 3 March.

  49. Valedictory speeches

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now move to what has been described as "an opportunity for retiring members to make short valedictory speeches" which should take us up to the end of today.

    First up: former defence secretary and until recently chief whip and leader of the House - two posts currently in the spotlight - Conservative MP Sir George Young, who is retiring after over 40 years as an MP.

  50. Point of order

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Charlotte Leslie raises a point of order to complain that three MPs raised points of order against her after her contribution in prime minister's questions, without any prior warning - a usual courtesy.

    John Bercow, who has regained his composure, says this is not a matter for the chair but reiterates that it is courtesy for these things to be flagged up ahead of time.

  51. Post update

    @DPMcBride

    Former adviser and author Damian McBride tweets: That was one of the most thrilling two hours of Commons action I've ever seen. Against all odds, a terrific end to this Parliament.

  52. Penrose Report statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Healh Minister Earl Howe repeats the second statement in the Lords, which repeats the answer to a Commons urgent question on the Penrose Report.

    The long-awaited report by Lord Penrose into patients being infected by contaminated blood supplies in the 1970s and 1980s has been published.

    While thousands of people across Britain were infected with Hepatitis C and HIV through NHS blood products, the inquiry was focused on victims in Scotland.

    It has been described as the worst treatment disaster in the history of the NHS.

    Bags of donated blood
  53. Intelligence files on MPs

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords is hearing a statement on intelligence files on MPs.

    A former undercover police officer has told BBC News that Scotland Yard kept intelligence files on MPs during the 1990s.

    Ex-Special Branch officer Peter Francis says he saw files on 10 Labour MPs which he and others regularly updated.

    He says he personally gathered information on three MPs as part of his work infiltrating left-wing groups.

    Labour has called for a forthcoming public inquiry into undercover policing to be widened. One of the Labour MPs monitored, Peter Hain, tabled the Commons urgent question earlier.

    Peter Francis in his various guises
    Image caption: Peter Francis transformed his appearance as he went deep undercover
  54. Final motion passed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The final motion to allow the Speaker to nominate no more than three deputies to serve until deputies are elected is passed without division.

  55. Government lost

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There will be no secret ballot for the election of a Speaker in the next Parliament.

    The government has lost the motion it put before the House last night.

  56. BreakingBreaking News

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    To loud cheers from around the House John Bercow, who appears to be on the verge of tears, announces that the government's motion has been defeated by 228 votes to 202, a majority of 26.

  57. Division! Clear the lobby!

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The first two motions - to trial a three day deadline for the tabling of amendments to Bills at report stage and adding the chair of the Petitions Committee to the list of position eligible for additional salaries - are passed without a vote.

    No such luck for the government with the third motion to change the election for the Speaker to be decided by a secret ballot, and not in open election, and a vote is called.

    MPs file out of the chamber and through the division lobbies, much like during the speakers election. Results are expected at 13.35 GMT.

  58. Debate extension

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Another point of order is raised by Conservative Jacob Rees-Mogg before the division, asking for an emergency debate under standing order 24, given there have been several complaints about the lack of time.

    John Bercow replies that this is not possible because the decision about today's proceedings were decided earlier in the week.

  59. Undercover policing statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The first of today's statement repeats begins.

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates is repeating the answer to an urgent question answered in the Commons earlier.

  60. Lack of support?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Jesse Norman raises a point of order complaining that there have not been more MPs "supporting" the motion called to speak in the debate.

    John Bercow argues that "if the honourable member's complaint is that there is a lack of time" then this is a matter for the government.

    He adds he'd "be happy to sit here all day and all night".

  61. 'Fatally wounding'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The disadvantage of establishing a secret ballot at the beginning of each parliament well leave the Speaker "fatally wounded" but still in post, Liberal Democrat MP Duncan Hames tells MPs and "that I think is the gravest danger to have weakened Speaker".

    He calls on his coalition partner William Hague to withdraw today's motion.

  62. Post update

    ‏@Markfergusonuk

    Editor of @LabourList Mark Ferguson tweets: If you're not watching the Speaker debate in the Commons, stop what you're doing. It's going to be a nail-biter

  63. 'Nasty party'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There are many other more pressing issues, such as the cash for access scandal or the buying of peerages, that could have been debated in this time, Labour MP Paul Flynn argues.

    This government will "stand to be shamed by this final act" and will be "exposed as the nasty party".

  64. Analysis: ending in uproar

    Isabel Hardman, The Spectator

    The Spectator

    Well, after months of Parliament appearing boring, tired and without things to discuss, the zombie seems to have woken up.

    MPs are currently in uproar in the Chamber over William Hague's proposal to make the re-election of the Speaker at the start of the Parliament a secret ballot.

    Read more of her analysis of how Parliament is ending in uproar.

  65. Withdrawal or humiliation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Paul Flynn says William Hague has a choice of "either withdrawal or humiliation in the division lobbies" because it's clear from the debate today that this is "entirely unacceptable" to "all corners of the House".

  66. Construction regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers agree the terrorism order and proceed to the next debate.

    Labour business, innovation and skills spokesman Lord Stevenson of Balmacara is opening a debate on the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015.

    The new regulations will come into force on 6 April and will make changes including the extension of health and safety duties to domestic construction projects.

  67. Killing the debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Pete Wishart asks if there's any way that "this question could not now be put", effectively killing the motion.

    After seeking advice from the chief clerk, John Bercow says this would only affect "the first of the motions, which is not the one that has excited the debate".

    Liberal Democrat MP David Heath suggests that Leader of the House could still withdraw the motion, but to no avail.

  68. Coalition bargaining chip?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Chris Bryant says "his concern" is that today's motion is part of a plan to "hand the Speaker out to someone else as part of the coalition negotiations" as the Conservatives "know they're not going to win a majority".

  69. Picture: Charles Walker expresses his unhappiness

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Charles Walker
  70. Post update

    Mark D'Arcy

    Parliamentary correspondent

    I wonder if that astounding speech by Charles Walker has swung the debate against Govt. A quite shattering speech.

  71. Post update

    @paulwaugh

    Editor of PoliticsHome.com Paul Waugh tweets: Charles Walker: I'll go home tonight and looking back in mirror at me will be "an honourable fool". Hague has decency to look shamefaced

  72. 'Rather be a fool than a clever man'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Procedure Committee Charles Walker concludes his speech by telling MPs that the Leader of the House and his deputies could have informed him of this debate at several points during the week - including at the Leader of the House's leaving drinks - but did not, and he only found out at 18.30 GMT last night.

    A visibly upset Mr Walker says: "I have been played as a fool and tonight I will look at in the mirror and see and honourable fool look back at me.

    "But I would rather be a fool in this matter than a clever man."

  73. Government and opposition agree

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Shadow home affairs spokeswoman Baroness Smith of Basildon says that Labour backs the proposal from government spokesman Lord Ashton of Hyde to ban Jamaat ul-Ahrar and the Haqqani Network.

    "The condemn themselves with their own words when they take credit for some of the atrocities they have committed," she says.

  74. Walker 'cross' at whips

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Procedure Committee Charles Walker says he was got "quite cross" with some of the whips who spoke to him yesterday about today's proceedings.

  75. Post update

    Mark D'Arcy

    Parliamentary correspondent

    Telling point -22 Chair Graham Brady sitting next to Charles Walker. Have we just seen the moment he became shoe-in as next Spkr?

  76. Post update

    @paulwaugh

    Editor of PoliticsHome.com Paul Waugh tweets: Charles Walker Procedure Cttee chairman says he's friend of Bercow and they both suffer from loss of temper. Says lost it with whips last nt

  77. 'Speaker in the speaker's chair'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Greg Barker is up again, asking a point of order. "Given the sensitivity" of the subject matter he asks if Speaker John Bercow should be in the chair presiding over this debate.

    John Bercow replies that "it is commonplace for the Speaker to be in the speaker's chair, I'm genuinely sorry if that it disquiets the gentleman".

  78. Independence of the House

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angela Eagle

    Shadow leader of the House Angela Eagle complains at the "appalling and shabby" situation MPs have been left in, with only one hour to discuss an issue that could have been discussed in great detail.

    Today's motion "effectively creates a motion of no confidence at the beginning of each Parliament and it mandates that it should be held in secret", she argues

    This "opens up the possibility that any government can threaten an existing Speaker in a way that undermines the independence of the House of Commons", she adds.

  79. Terrorism order

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Finance Bill passes and the next item of business is an order to amend the Terrorism Act 2000.

    The order would add two groups to the list of organisations proscribed by the act.

    Jamaat ul-Ahrar (JuA) is a militant Islamist group that split away from Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan in 2014, and aims to establish an Islamic caliphate in Pakistan and aspires to extend global jihad into the Indian subcontinent.

    The Haqqani Network (HQN) is an Islamist, nationalist group seeking to establish sharia law in Afghanistan.

  80. Hague for secret ballot

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    While maintaining that today's motion is a free vote, William Hague concludes his opening remarks by reaffirming that it in his view "it is right" that the Speaker's election be conducted by secret ballot.

  81. About the Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Commons debates the Budget and scrutinises the the Finance Bill, which enacts the Chancellor's plans.

    The bill must pass through both Houses of Parliament but, by convention, the House of Lords does not amend "money bills" - legislation on taxation or public spending.

    News, features and analysis on Budget 2015 from the BBC is available here.

  82. Analysis

    Mark D'Arcy

    Parliamentary correspondent

    A secret ballot, the argument goes, would allow the more timorous MPs to vote against a Speaker without fear of revenge.

    The idea has been floating about for years - it was mooted by the Commons Procedure Committee back in 2011, although the committee has since changed its mind.

    And even when there was plenty of spare Commons time available, it was never debated.

    Incidentally the Committee chair, the Conservative Charles Walker, who helped drag Speaker Bercow to the Chair in 2009, was not consulted on the decision to put one of his committee's ex-recommendations to the House.

  83. Committee recommendations

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Procedure Committee report, which today's motion is based on, did not make a recommendation on how the election of the Speaker should be decided but did recommend that the House be given the chance to vote on whether it be decided by secret ballot or by open division.

    However only two members of the Procedure Committee have supported the method of re-electing a Speaker by a secret ballot in the past.

    In a subsequent letter members of the committee wrote the Leader of the House asking that any such debate should take place in prime time "and should not be tucked away on a Thursday".

  84. Post update

    @DArcyTiP

    Mark D'Arcy

    Parliamentary correspondent

    Btw - #Bercow remaining in the Chair for this debate.

  85. Four motions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There are actually four motions being debated today, though three of them have been eclipsed by the controversy surrounding the secret ballot for the Speaker.

    The first motion proposes trialling a three day deadline for the tabling of amendments to bills at report stage.

    The second motion adds the chair of the Petitions Committee to the list of position eligible for additional salaries.

    The third motion seeks to change the procedures regarding elections for positions in the Commons.

  86. Secret ballot motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now finally get to the motion itself, which reads:

    That this House notes the recommendation of the Procedure Committee in its Fifth Report of Session 2010-12, 2010 Elections for positions in the House, that the House should be invited to decide between a secret ballot or open division where the question at the start of a new Parliament that a former Speaker take the Chair is challenged, and accordingly makes the following change to Standing Orders, with effect from the beginning of the new Parliament:

    Standing Order 1A (Re-election of former Speaker) Line 11, at end insert- "(1A) If that question is contested, it shall be determined by secret ballot, to take place on the same day under arrangements made by the Member presiding, who shall announce the result of the ballot to the House as soon as is practicable."

  87. Decision time

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Jonathan Reynolds asks when the Leader of the House made his decision to bring the debate before this House.

    William Hague says the decision was made when "it became apparent there would be no Lords amendments to debate."

  88. Post update

    ‏@AlanDuncanMP

    Conservative MP Alan Duncan tweets: The Speaker should not remain in the Chair for a motion that affects him. Rather proves people's point.

  89. 'Fingerprints of the whips office'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Philip Davies says that while he is "a great admirer" of Mr Hague it is "unjustifiable" to keep it secret to the last minute and have just one hour to debate the matter.

    Today's debacle "is the kind of student union politics that has the fingerprints of the whips office all over it".

  90. Post update

    @IsabelHardman

    The Spectator's Isabel Hardman tweets: Basically, if you're going to do something 'clever' in Parliament, whether on Speaker or European Arrest W, you need to be actually clever

  91. 'Parliamentary jigery-pokery'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jacob Rees-Mogg, a Conservative MP and stickler for procedure, says Mr Hague is one of "the most revered and admired figures within the Conservative party" with a reputation built on "being a great parliamentarian".

    This is why it is "with the deep sadness that many feel that his career should end with his name being put to a bit of parliamentary jiggery-pokery" which has been brought about due to personal vendettas against John Bercow.

  92. Picture: Leader of the House William Hague

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    William Hague
  93. 'No case' for this

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Julian Lewis says that while "there is a case" for a secret ballot, "there is no case for staging a debate at the 11th hour on the last day when people have been sent away to get on with campaigning".

    Despite loud jeers from his own side, he adds that Conservatives were unaccountably told that their campaigning duties had been postponed - and now I know the reason why, he says.

  94. Post update

    @IrrancaDaviesMP

    Labour MP Huw Irranca-Davies ‏tweets: Very sad ending to Hague's career currently being played out in parliament. Even Tory colleagues criticising this shabby attack on Speaker

  95. Secret v open ballot

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Greg Baker, who was earlier reprimanded by Speaker John Bercow for talking, asks "how many [of the elected positions ion the House] are elected by secret ballot and how many by open division?"

    William Hague tells MPs the "great majority are by secret ballot".

  96. Post update

    @paulwaugh

    Editor of PoliticsHome.com Paul Waugh tweets: Serious allegation from Eagle, says Hague misled her about Gove intentions on secret ballot

  97. 'Grubby and underhand'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Leader of the House Angela Eagle says that in 23 years "I have never seen a parliament behave in such a grubby and underhand manner".

    She asks: "Why is the motion before us today the complete opposite of the motion drafted by the committee and given to the government?"

    Today's motion has "nothing to do with the committee report and everything to do with the character of the prime minster", she argues.

  98. Post update

    @PickardJE

    Financial Times's Jim Pickard tweets: Commons getting a bit shouty over Tory plan to undermine Bercow: "Shut it man." "Fool". "Partisan." "Shabby manoeuvre." Etc

  99. 'Bad day for Parliament'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Peter Bone agrees that this House should "not be asked without sufficient notice to be doing such an important thing".

    "This is a bad day for Parliament," he adds.

  100. 'Sad sad sad Mr Hague'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Gerald Kaufman is not impressed.

    This "grubby decision is what [William Hague] personally will be remembered for after a distinguished career", he says.

    Without any consultation with the opposition or the chair of the Procedure Committee, he has sought to bring about "fundamental change in this House's proceedings."

    He accuses Mr Hague of making "sure there is a large attendance at a whipped event in another building here" making "his claim of a free vote is fraudulent".

    Mr Hague has "descended to squalor in the final days of the Parliament".

    "Sad sad sad Mr Hague, change your mind."

  101. What's happening?

    Urgent question

    MPs will later today debate a last-minute bid to change the way the Speaker of the Commons is elected.

    What's happening in the House of Commons right now is an urgent question, called by Labour, about today's business.

    The government has put forward a motion to allow a secret, rather than open, ballot to decide whether to re-appoint the incumbent as Speaker post-election.

    The motion was put forward last night - and has caused outrage, with criticism from Labour and supporters of John Bercow.

  102. 'Not unusual'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leader of the House William Hague says "tabling motions at short notice are not unusual in the closing of Parliament."

    The decision to table the motion today was partially based on the "absence of Lords amendments...freeing up parliamentary time" and "last week's report of the Procedure Committee" which asked for this issue to be debated.

  103. Speaker election: urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Gerald Kaufman is now asking William Hague, the Commons Leader, about the change to today's business announced yesterday evening.

    Assuming he is re-elected to Manchester Gorton, Sir Gerald will become the Father of the House, tasked with overseeing the re-election of the Speaker when Parliament reassembles.

  104. 'Scandal brewing'?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Pamela Nash, chair of the all party group on HIV, says he often hears "of incidents where NHS staff do not have the best available knowledge at their fingertips" and asks "if [the government] is confident there's not a similar tragedy brewing in the NHS today".

  105. Prorogation announcement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government whip Lord Taylor of Holbeach announces that, following the conclusion of business today, the House of Lords will adjourn to await the conclusion of business in the Commons.

    After that, prorogation of Parliament will take place, before Parliament is finally dissolved for the general election.

    The next business is consideration of the Finance (No.2) Bill, which puts the measures announced in the chancellor's Budget into law.

    MPs passed all stages of the bill yesterday.

  106. One recommendation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Penrose report made only a single recommendation - that anyone in Scotland who had a blood transfusion before 1991 should be tested for Hepatitis C if they have not already done so.

    There was an angry response to the report from victims and relatives, who had gathered at the National Museum in Edinburgh to see its publication after a six-year wait, with shouts of "whitewash" after its conclusions were read out.

  107. 'Inaccurate and irresponsible'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Justice Minister Lord Faulks says the Howard League for penal reform was prevented from visiting two privately-run prisons because it had made "inaccurate and irresponsible criticisms".

    Lord Ramsbotham, the former chief inspector of prisons in England and Wales, says the minister is trying to "defend the indefensible".

    He accuses the Justice Secretary, Chris Grayling, of having "wrought havoc on the entire justice system".

  108. 'Mountain that produced a mouse'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Tom Clarke raises the case of one of his constituents, who was infected, who is "devastated" by the report which he says "offers him nothing" - and considers the £25m offer from the prime minister "as mere peanuts, not even enough for Scotland."

    The report is a "mountain which produced a mouse" as the inquiry "cost £12m, went on for seven years and produced one recommendation" and is "not sufficient to respond to 4,000 people suffering".

  109. Prisons question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The fourth and final question - and the final Lords question of this Parliament - has been tabled by crossbencher Lord Ramsbotham.

    He asks why G4S was told to retract an invitation to the Howard League for Penal Reform to visit HM Prison Birmingham and HM Prison Oakwood.

  110. 'Further inquiry'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham is now on his feet responding to the statement. He says the prime minister's apology "will only have real meaning if it is followed by efforts to bring accountability, truth and redress."

    Their needs to be a "further process of inquiry" in the next parliament as the report "doesn't answer all of the questions, nor does it apply accountability to individuals."

    "While we can't bring a resolution today the best thing we can say today is that we will work together across this house to bring a full fair and final resolution to this terrible injustice," he adds.

    Health Minister Jane Ellison says she can "certainly agree" to cross party support, but says today's report should act as a "building block" for decision for future parliaments.

    Andy Burnham
  111. 'For the next government'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to the urgent question, Health Minister Jane Ellison repeats Prime Minister David Cameron's apology on behalf of the British government to victims of the contaminated blood scandal.

    She tells MPs that government will provide up to £25m in 2015/16 to support any transitional arrangement to a better payment system for victims.

    But "it will be for the next government to provide a more substantive response once its had time to consider what the inquiry says", she adds.

  112. Penrose inquiry statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now move to the urgent question on the report of the Penrose inquiry into the thousands of people who were infected with Hepatitis C and HIV through NHS blood products in the 1970s and 1980s.

    The report described the saga as "the stuff of nightmares" but the inquiry concluded few matters could have been done differently.

  113. Police question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The third questions is from Labour home affairs spokeswoman Baroness Smith of Basildon.

    She asks for an assessment of the impact on community safety of the reduction in police numbers, including the reduction in traffic police.

  114. John Bercow in the chair

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In response to a point of order, Speaker John Bercow confirms that he will remain in the seat during today's debates on changing the election system for the Speaker.

    He tells MPs he will "remain in this chair today and hopefully for days to come."

  115. Home Secretary speech

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper raises a point of order to ask the Speaker to use his influence to urge the home secretary to come to the House today "to give clear answers" about the "scope of the inquiry" and "the transparency and access to individual files."

    John Bercow replies that he has "no doubt that" the clerks of the House "will not wait to be asked but will proactively take steps to ensure the concerns of the House are understood by Lord Justice Pitchford."

  116. Second question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The next question in the Lords asks what progress has been made on the introduction of a system of regulation for private investigators, as announced by the home secretary on 31 July 2013.

    Labour peer Baroness Henig has tabled the question.

  117. About Lord Waddington

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    David Waddington served as Conservative home secretary from 1989-90.

    He became a peer in 1990 and served as Leader of the Lords until 1992.

    David Waddington
    Image caption: David Waddington, pictured in 1989
  118. 'Authorisation at a very senior level'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Diane Abbott, another of Labour's MPs who was allegedly under surveillance, argues such investigations "could not have happened without authorisation at a very senior level."

    She says she wants to know "who authorised it and on what grounds" and wants a copy of her file.

    "It's not just a breach of privilege, it is a breach of the privacy and confidence of the many people I worked with," she says.

  119. Lord Waddington retires

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Business in the Lords begins with an announcement from the Lord Speaker that Conservative peer and former home secretary Lord Waddington will be retiring from the House.

    After that, the first question is from crossbench peer Baroness Boothroyd, about the development of London's South Bank.

    Baroness Boothroyd is concerned about the impact of the development on the Palace of Westminster and the Westminster UN World Heritage Site.

  120. Whistleblowers

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP, and long time campaigner for transparency into the investigation of an alleged a child abuse ring at Westminster, Tom Watson asks "why [Mike Penning] can give immunity to whistleblowers in this case but can't give a cast iron guarantee to whistleblowers in the child abuse case."

    Mike Penning replies he "will look into it and find out."

  121. 'Extraordinary situation'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Home Secretary Jack Straw tells MPs that today's revelation appears to show that his decision to set up an inquiry into the death of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence - "taken against a lot of resistance from the Metropolitan Police" - may have happened at a time when "elements of the Metropolitan Police were themselves spying on the bereaved family".

    It also appears to show the "extraordinary situation where I as home secretary, and for three years the police authority for the Metropolitan Police, not only knew nothing about what appears to be going on within the Met Police but also may have been subject to unlawful surveillance myself," he adds.

  122. Who's retiring?

    Today is the final day of the 2010 Parliament. There are a total of 86 MPs standing down, including Leader of the House William Hague.

    : it includes a total of 17 former cabinet ministers - 12 Labour and five Conservative.

    The departure of Mr Hague, Sir George Young and Stephen Dorrell takes the number of John Major cabinet survivors down to three: Ken Clarke, Peter Lilley, (who both served under Margaret Thatcher as well) and John Redwood.

    The retirements on the Labour side leave only three members of Tony Blair's first cabinet - Nick Brown, Margaret Beckett and Harriet Harman - in the Commons, assuming they manage to retain their seats.

    High profile Labour retirees include former Prime Minister Gordon Brown and ex-cabinet ministers Alistair Darling, David Blunkett and Dame Tessa Jowell.

    Former Foreign Secretary Jack Straw, who has had the Labour whip suspended, and who now sits as an independent, is also standing down.

    A total of 10 Liberal Democrats, including two women. are standing down. Retirees include former leader Sir Menzies Campbell.

  123. Post update

    @MarkReckless

    UKIP MP Mark Reckless ‏tweets: Meeting in the Conservative Whips office: plotting against the Speaker?

    Whips office
  124. Helped 'paedophiles disappear into thin air'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Dennis Skinner suggests these investigations on MPs may be "one of the reason why all those paedophiles managed to disappear into thin air and why Jimmy Savile never had his collar felt."

    "Why did they only pursue left wingers?" he asks, and jokes that Peter Francis must have been a "busy man to follow me at 5,000 industrial meetings in the last 30 years."

    He adds that he thinks he may have spotted the "agent provocateur" during the mining strikes: "a posh man with a flat cap that looked like he'd bought it from Harrods."

    Dennis Skinner
  125. Today in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords meets shortly for questions to ministers, after which peers will consider the Finance Bill, which gives a legal basis to the measures announced in last week's Budget.

    Peers will consider orders to ban terrorist organisations and Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015.

    Two of the three Commons urgent questions - on undercover policing and on the Penrose Inquiry - will be repeated as statements.

    The final debate concerns the use of immigration detention in the United Kingdom.

  126. Harriet Harman file

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Harriet Harman asks for an assurance that the police will offer a "full copy of her file" when the inquiry is done - a request she has had turned down before.

    The issues are more important than "just feeding our views" she tells MPs. "Security services do an important job but if they overstep the mark they must be held to account," she says.

    Her file stemmed from campaigning work "for the rights of women and the rights of workers"; work that is "essential for our democracy", she says.

    Mike Penning says he cannot give such an assurance as there may be "security reasons" why parts of the file cannot be released.

  127. Post update

    @timsculthorpe

    PA's Parliamentary Editor Tim Sculthorpe tweets: Charles Walker in the chamber. Showed document to Greg Knight, now talking to David Davis. I wonder if he's drafting a manuscript a/ment?

  128. 'Fundamental questions'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Peter Hain says today's revelation raises a number of "fundamental questions on parliamentary sovereignty and privilege".

    "Did this monitoring affect our ability to speak confidentially with constituents... or our ability to represent them properly?

    "Did they exploit private information shared by constituents or lawyers with any of us as MPs?" he asks.

    It is one thing to have a file on an MP who is suspected of sexual abuse or sympathising with terrorist, Mr Hain says but "quite another" to have a file "deriving from campaigns promoting values of social justice, human rights and equality."

  129. Surveillance of MPs

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Peter Hain asks for the remit of the public inquiry to be extended to "include surveillance of MPs publicly named by Peter Francis".

    Between 1990 and 2001, Peter Francis claims to have personally seen records relating to Diane Abbott, the late Tony Benn, Jeremy Corbyn, the late Bernie Grant, Harriet Harman, Ken Livingstone, Joan Ruddock, Dennis Skinner, Jack Straw, and Mr Hain,

    Peter Hain
  130. 'Essential tactic'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Justice Minister Mike Penning opens by telling MPs that undercover policing is an "essential tactic in fighting crime".

    But he admits that the government have "known for some time historic failings" which is why Home Secretary Theresa May has launched a statutory inquiry - led by Lord Justice Pitchford.

    This inquiry, he says, will "improve public confidence that no repeat of these failings happen again".

  131. Undercover policing question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now move to the first of today's urgent questions on undercover policing. The question has been tabled by Labour's Peter Hain, one of several MPs reportedly monitored by Scotland Yard during 1990s according to former undercover police officer Peter Francis.

    The ex-Special Branch officer says he saw files on 10 Labour MPs which he and others regularly updated, and that he personally gathered information on three MPs as part of his work infiltrating left-wing groups.

    Peter Hain
    Image caption: A Young Peter Hain - Monitored in his youth and monitored as an MP?
  132. Post update

    ‏@timsculthorpe

    PA Parliamentary Editor Tim Sculthorpe tweets: Bis questions now overrunning by five minutes. Because there's nothing else scheduled today...

  133. Post update

    @ayestotheright

    Journalist Tony Grew tweets: Vince is keeping MPs amused at his last turn at the despatch box of this parliament

  134. Depreciation woes

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Kelvin Hopkins warns that the UK's trade deficit to the European Union - currently £1bn a week "equivalent to one million jobs lost" - means the "major depreciation of the euro...will cause serious long term damage to the economy."

    Kelvin Hopkins
  135. Post update

    @Mike_Fabricant

    Conservative MP Michael Fabricant tweets: Interesting tactic. 3 urgent questions chosen by Speaker today which will delay vote on secret ballot for a sitting Speaker.

  136. 'Zero hours' wedge

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Paul Flynn tries to drive a wedge between the coalition parties on the last day.

    He asks Liberal Democrat Business Minister Jo Swinson if, when "liberated from control of the thought police of the Tory nomenclature" she will look back on the legacy of her department on the most vulnerable workers and those on "zero-Hour contracts" and produce a verdict of "nothing achieved much lost".

    Jo Swinson says she "wholeheartedly disagrees". She is proud of her department's legacy, she says, and "proud that we are taking forward measures to protect workers on Zero hours contracts".

  137. MPs' views

    BBC Radio 4 Today

    New Forest East Conservative MP Julian Lewis is furious - as his interview on Radio 4's Today programme earlier today shows.

    The motion calling for a secret ballot to replace the current division to elect the Speaker of the House of Commons is being put before MPs today, but some, like Mr Lewis see this as a deliberate ploy to unseat current Speaker John Bercow.

    Many of Mr Bercow's former Conservatives colleagues don't like what they consider to be his high-handed manner, and believe that he favours opposition MPs over government MPs.

    "This was tabled late the evening before the last day that parliament is sitting behind the backs of the chairman of the procedure committee by the Leader of the House, even though the chairman of the procedure committee wrote to the Leader of the House on the 3 February [on the matter]," says Mr Lewis.

    "And I have the letter in my hand saying: 'May I once again confirm the committee's view that the debate should be held on a Tuesday or a Wednesday and should not be tucked away on a Thursday afternoon'".

    Mr Lewis says whatever the merits of the case "this is an absolute ambush".

  138. Student debt

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Valerie Vaz asks pointedly if the £43,000 of "unsecured debt" that university graduates will be taking on when they leave university - thanks to the government's tuition fee reforms - will "squeeze" middle income families.

    "No!" Business Minister Greg Clarke replies.

    He tells MPs that "net of tax of loans and student loans university graduates earn £200,000 more over the course of their life than some one with only A-Levels."

    Greg Clarke
  139. 'Unworthy manoeuvre'

    The Spectator

    Isabel Hardman at the Spectator has seen an email from Conservative MP Julian Lewis, which was passed to the magazine's Coffee House, about what he calls an 'Unworthy Manoeuvre'.

  140. Women engineers

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Megg Munn calls on Vince Cable to spend his last few days in office fixing a misfiring fund for women engineers. Only £200,000 out of the £10m fund was released because many firms "could not afford" to apply, she says.

    Vince Cable says he will "undertake to look at this", and admits that the UK has a "shortage of women engineers" and "underperforms the rest of Europe."

  141. Picture: Vince Cable at the despatch box

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Vince Cable
  142. Post update

    ‏@paulwaugh

    Editor of PoliticsHome.com Paul Waugh tweets: Bercow has granted 3 Urgent Questions on undercover cops, blood products + change to business. Allows his allies more time to circle wagons?

  143. We remember them

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Speaker John Bercow opens proceedings in the House of Commons on a sombre note, reading a list of MPs who died in April 1915 in World War I, including William Gladstone - the grandson of former Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone and the last of four generations of Gladstones to serve in the House of Commons.

  144. Business questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    But before all that MPs begin the day with question to Business Secretary Vince Cable and his ministerial team.

    First question is from Conservative MP Andrew Stephenson who asks what support there is for aerospace engineering in his Pendle constituency over the next five years.

  145. Post update

    @timsculthorpe

    PA's Parliamentary Editor Tim Sculthorpe tweets: Three urgent questions will delay the crunch vote on changing speaker re-election rules - Bercow granted them this morning.

  146. Lords amendments

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Then business will drop down to a slightly lower gear as MPs turn to any last minute tidying up of Lords amendments and any loose end of remaining bills.

    Then there will be what is delicately described as "an opportunity for retiring members to make short valedictory speeches."

    We're told around 30 retiring MPs may decide to bid farewell.

  147. Urgent questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    At 10.30 GMT there will be an urgent question on undercover policing, then this will be followed immediately by a statement on the Penrose report, which found thousands of people were infected with Hepatitis C and HIV through NHS blood products in the 1970s and 1980s.

  148. Good morning

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our live rolling coverage of the day's main events in Westminster on the final day of this Parliament.

    There looks set to be some end of term fireworks today - though not the celebratory kind - as Labour have been granted three urgent questions.

    The main event looks set to be the final urgent question on today's motion to change the way MPs elect the Speaker. The motion would change the voting system from an open vote, where MPs stream through the lobbies, to a closed voting system.

    Intriguing by itself, but yesterday shadow leader of the house Angela Eagle stormed in to the chamber to highlight the fact that none of the usual courtesies were followed when tabling today's motion and the opposition were not consulted.

    Labour is not happy.