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Summary

  1. The Queen sets out government's plans
  2. Because of short notice, less pomp than usual
  3. Duke of Edinburgh unwell so does not attend
  4. Prince Charles steps in for the occasion
  5. Brexit dominates with 8 of 27 bills
  6. This year's event follows snap election

Live Reporting

By Jackie Storer and Alex Hunt

All times stated are UK

  1. May: Queen's Speech is about opportunities for every community

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mrs May acknowledges there is much talk of a divided Britain, promising her government will try to "overcome those divisions".

    "This Queen's Speech is about recognising and grasping the opportunity for every community to benefit from leaving the EU," she adds.

    She aims to put "fairness at the heart of our agenda".

  2. May: We all share a desire to ensure people are safe at home

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Theresa May has outlined the payments the families of Grenfell will receive, the public inquiry and how people will be rehoused.

    A new civil disaster response task force could be set up to help local authorities, like Kensington and Chelsea, that struggled to cope with the disaster, she said.

    "We all share a desire to ensure people are safe and have the confidence that they are safe in their homes," she said.

    The cause of the fire is not yet known, there is a criminal investigation, public inquiry and proposal for an advocate, and any action that is recommended will be acted upon, she said.

  3. May jokes about troubled start to her government

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mrs May accuses the mover, Richard Benyon, of stealing her jokes, before welcoming "the lack of Salmond" in the new Parliament, which doesn't go down well with the SNP.

    She mentions that Kwasi Kwarteng wrote a book on Margaret Thatcher in which the section on her early difficulties ran to 272 pages, joking that she "dreads to think how long my entry will be".

    She congratulates Jeremy Corbyn for fighting a "spirited" campaign in the election and for coming "a good second", in doing so performing "better than the pundits predicted and than many of his MPs hoped" in the election.

  4. In quotes: Theresa May apology to Grenfell families

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Quote Message: The support on the ground for families in the initial hours was not good enough. People were left without belongings, without roofs over their heads, without basic information about what had happened, what they should do and where they could seek help. That was a failure of the state - local and national - to help people when they needed it most. As prime minister, I apologise for that failure - and as prime minister, I've taken responsibility for doing what we can to put things right."
  5. Watch: Corbyn hails election gains

    Video content

    Video caption: Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was speaking following the Queen's Speech
  6. Famous faces in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Gordon Brown's Chancellor of the Exchequer Lord Darling swears in at the despatch box in the House of Lords.

    Lord Darling
  7. Watch: Jacob Rees-Mogg v Speaker John Bercow

    Video content

    Video caption: The Conservative MP was among those on the government benches seeking to intervene during Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn's speech
  8. PM apologises for Grenfell Tower 'failure'

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mrs May turns to the Grenfell Tower fire, saying "the whole country was heartbroken" by it.

    She admits that immediate response to it was "a failure of the state, local and national, and I apologise for that failure".

  9. Peers return

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords

    Members of the House of Lords are taking their seats before their own debate on the Queen's speech gets under way.

    Peers are also swearing in, but as there are over 800 of them, this process will last slightly longer than it does in the Commons.

  10. May pays tribute to Corbyn's support of mosque attack victims

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Theresa May

    Theresa May's tributes, include one to Jeremy Corbyn, for his night-time work supporting the victims of the Mosque attack in Finsbury Park, in his constituency.

    Moving on to talk about security, she says the government will work to reach international agreements to regulate cyberspace to prevent the spread of extremism and terrorist planning.

    It will also encourage tech companies to do more to remove harmful content from their networks. A new commission for countering extremism to help fight hatred and extremism will be set up, she said, adding: "We'll stop at nothing to defeat it."

  11. PM: We must stand together

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    May

    The prime minister begins her contribution by sending her best wishes to the Duke of Edinburgh and to those affected by recent terrorist attacks.

    She talks about measures the government will take to confront terrorism, saying "we should all welcome the effort to tackle extremism".

    "Our resolve must be to stand together more strongly than ever."

  12. Corbyn: 'We are a government in waiting'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn hails Labour as "not merely an opposition", stressing: "We are a government in waiting, with a policy programme that enthused and engaged millions of people in this election, many for the first time ever in their political lives".

    Repeating Theresa May's election mantra, he says Labour will provide "strong and stable leadership", but "for the many not the few".

    The Labour leader sits down to his side cheering and banging their seats in approval.

  13. Corbyn: Government has no majority, mandate or programme

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn says Labour would support the government if it rejected austerity, claiming instead it continues "to make people worse off" and "deepens divisions".

    "We would end austerity by making very different choices," he says, by asking the highest 5% of earners "to pay a little bit more".

    He says the Conservatives are continuing without a majority, a mandate, a serious legislative programme, while struggling to stitch together a deal to stay in office.

  14. Ex health minister welcomes social care rethink

    The World at One

    BBC Radio 4

    Video content

    Video caption: Queen's speech: Tory MP Dan Poulter says he is pleased rushed social care plan was dropped

    Former health minister Dr Dan Poulter thinks the prime minister made the right decision not to include the legislation on social care policy in the Queen's speech.

    The Conservative MP for Central Suffolk and North Ipswich, who was a health minister from 2012 to 2015, says"You can't do social care policy on the back of a fag packet for a manifesto at that short notice and that was clearly a big mistake".

    He added "I'm pleased that there has been a rethink now in the Queen's speech" which has resulted in a "genuine consultation on the future of social care".

  15. Corbyn: Voters' message is austerity must be brought to an end

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Jeremy Corbyn sums up the election campaign, saying Theresa May had claimed that "if I lose just six seats I will lose this election", adding "when it came to it she lost four times as many seats to Labour alone".

    He says voters "chose hope over fear" and had "sent an unequivocal message that austerity must be brought to an end".

  16. Corbyn links Grenfell Tower to cuts in public services

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Corbyn goes on to urge better support for fire services and to look again at the safety of tower blocks.

    He highlights "massive cuts" to local authorities, arguing: "We need the resources now - the money has got to be there so we can save lives."

    The Grenfell Tower fire shows what happens when public services are "cut to the bone", he claims.

  17. SNP’s Blackman on Scottish expectations if DUP deal agreed

    Video content

    Video caption: Scotland would expect similar funding if DUP £2bn deal agreed says Kirsty Blackman