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Live Reporting

By Hamish Mackay, Kate Whannel and Matt Cannon

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight and thanks for joining us

    That ends our rolling coverage for today on yet another eventful day in the Commons.

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson has faced a double defeat in the Commons after MPs turned down his motion for a general election.

    There has been a lot to take in, so if you're still catching up - and who would blame you - here's a quick reminder of the major happenings:

    • The bill seeking to prevent a no-deal on 31 October cleared the Commons
    • It now heads to the House of Lords where a filibustering operation could hold it up its progress
    • The PM's motion for an early election failed to get the two-thirds majority needed to pass
    • Boris Johnson had his first Prime Minister's Questions
    • Meanwhile, No 10's decision to withdraw the party whip from 21 Tory rebels has faced criticism
    • And the chancellor set out his spending plans for the coming year
  2. 'Britain's worst PM' - according to the Mirror

    The Daily Mirror uses its front page to declare Mr Johnson "Britain's worst PM (since the last one)".

    An image of what the paper calls a "deflated" Mr Johnson looking downward fills the front page. Theresa May smiles out from an inset picture.

    A more animated photo of the prime minister fills the front page of the Daily Express. "Boris urges 'people power' to force election," is the headline.

    It calls Jeremy Corbyn's decision not to support a general election until a bill designed to help avert a no-deal Brexit is passed "an extraordinary act of cowardice".

    The front page of the Mirror
    The front page of the Express
  3. Corbyn 'chickens out of an election'

    The front pages of the Daily Mail and the Sun both pick up on Boris Johnson calling Jeremy Corbyn a "chicken" for refusing to back a general election before the Hilary Benn's bill is passed into law.

    The Sun goes as far as superimposing the Labour leader's face onto a chicken, alongside the headline "Is this the most dangerous chicken in Britain?".

    Meanwhile, the Daily Telegraph opts for the headline "'Hypocrite' Corbyn rejects election to break deadlock".

    Front page of the Daily Mail
    Front page of the Sun
    Front page of the Daily Telegraph
  4. Boris Johnson is 'cornered'

    The newspapers are responding to another momentous day in Parliament.

    The front pages of the i, the Guardian and the Financial Times all say the prime minister has been left "cornered" by MPs after losing three votes in the Commons.

    The front page of the Guardian
    The front page of the Financial Times
    The front page of the i newspaper
  5. Barnier: Brexit talks stuck in 'paralysis'

    Michel Barnier, the EU's chief Brexit negotiator, is reported to have told European diplomats that negotiations with London over the terms of Britain's withdrawal from the EU are in a state of paralysis.

    He also advised the meeting that Britain appeared intent on reducing the level of ambition in the political declaration that will steer the next stage of the negotiations.

    The statement is in stark contrast with claims by the UK government that progress has been made in redrafting elements of the agreement painstakingly negotiated over the past two years.

    BBC Europe editor Katya Adler said it was leading EU leaders to think Mr Johnson "cannot have a solution up his sleeve - despite all the rhetoric".

  6. Elections and Brexit: How did your MP vote?

    MPs in Parliament

    Find our how your local MP voted on the bill to rule out a no-deal Brexit, and on the PM's call for an early general election.

    Elections and Brexit: How did your MP vote?

    MPs in Parliament

    MPs have voted on an early general election and a bill that could delay Brexit.

    Read more
    next
  7. Tory MP Sir Michael Fallon to stand down

    Sir Michael Fallon
    Image caption: Sir Michael Fallon has been the MP for Sevenoaks since 1997

    Former Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon has announced he will be standing down at the next election.

    In a statement he said: "Sadly I have decided that this parliament will be my last. I have served as an MP, for both Darlington and Sevenoaks, for more than 30 years - quite long enough.

    "I want to thank all my constituents for their support and encouragement.

    "Wendy and I will continue to live in the constituency and to be involved locally. If an immediate election is called, I will not therefore be a candidate."

  8. How does no-deal influence voters?

    Professor Sir John Curtice

    Polling expert

    "I think the truth is the argument about no-deal is just a re-hash of the debate about whether we want to remain or leave in the first place."

    "With Brexit there is no point in talking about the electorate as a whole.

    "We have two different electorates: we have a remain electorate and we have a leave electorate.

    "Seventy five per cent of remain voters think that leaving without a deal is a bad idea and they oppose it. And around 75% of leave voters think that it is a good idea and they favour it.

    "We're now seeing that divide remain/leave divide very, very clearly articulated in their preference for a general election."

  9. EU citizens could stay in UK for three years

    The government has announced that some EU nationals will be able to apply to stay in the UK for three years in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

    Those arriving in the UK before the end of next year will be able to apply to the new scheme, the government confirmed on Wednesday evening.

    This would allow EU nationals who arrive before the end of 2020 to stay until December 2023.

    You can read the full story here.

  10. What happened today?

    It's been yet another busy day in British politics, but here are the key points:

    • The bill seeking to prevent a no deal on 31 October cleared the Commons
    • It now heads to the House of Lords where a filibustering operation could hold it up its progress
    • The PM's motion for an early election failed to get the two-thirds majority needed to pass
    • Boris Johnson had his first Prime Minister's Questions
    • And the chancellor set out his spending plans for the coming year

    Click here to read up on the five things that happened on Wednesday

  11. House of Lords update

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    MPs now carry on with their usual business - in this case presenting public petitions to the House.

    Over in the House of Lords, peers are still voting on amendments to the business motion which aims at ensuring the no-deal bill has time to become law before the suspension of Parliament.

    They are currently discussing amendment 2C but there are over 100 to get through.

    BBC parliamentary correspondent Mark D'arcy says: "There is talk of them talking til they drop to get through all these amendments so they can then deal with the bill.

    "It is not going very fast.

    "There are attempts to get behind-the-scenes talks going but the government seems prepared to just talk it out.

    "The bill may have a rather bumpy ride."

  12. Lib Dems: Stopping no deal is priority

    Responding to the Conservative Government defeat tonight, Leader of the Liberal Democrats Jo Swinson says her party "cannot let Boris Johnson use an election to tip the country into a dangerous no-deal Brexit, which neither the people nor their representatives support".

    In a press statement, she reiterates the party "relish the opportunity to fight an election" but that stopping a no deal is their priority.

    "Therefore, we will not support an election until Article 50 has been extended," she says.

  13. Johnson 136 votes short of a general election

    chart
  14. PM: Corbyn should reflect on his position

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Boris Johnson

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson now gets to his feet to speak.

    He says Jeremy Corbyn "has become the first leader of the opposition in the democratic history of our country to refuse the invitation of an election".

    "I can only speculate as to the reason behind his hesitation," he says.

    "The obvious conclusion is he does not think he can win."

    The PM urges Jeremy Corbyn to "reflect on his position".

  15. BreakingMPs reject motion for an early election

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have voted to reject the motion for an early election:

    Ayes: 298

    Noes: 56

    Majority:242

    The ayes have it, but the motion has not obtained the two-thirds majority required.