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Summary

  1. Public Administration Committee inquiry into EU referendum
  2. MPs questioned Liz Truss and ministers
  3. Urgent question granted on Orgreave, and statement on press matters
  4. Main business was last stages of Investigatory Powers Bill
  5. Peers examined Investigatory Powers Bill and Wales Bill
  6. Peers had second reading of Pension Schemes Bill

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Prashar concludes the debate by making two points. 

    Firstly she is disappointed that the government has dismissed the report's call for refugee children to be appointed a guardian and warns that failing to do so is only "storing up problems for later".

    Secondly she emphasises one of the report's conclusions - that implementing "family reunification" did not act as a pull factor encouraging refugees to make the journey to Europe.

    And there the debate comes to an end, as does the evening in the Lords.

    Peers return tomorrow for oral questions at 3pm.

  2. Government has made 'significant progress'

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Baroness Williams tells peers that "significant progress" has been made in speeding up transfers to the UK.

    However she explains that the UK still needs to abide by the laws of the countries in which they operate - for example France and Greece.

    In terms of financial support she says the UK has established a £10 million fund to support refugee children in Europe.

    She adds that the UK has pledged £2.3 billion to the Syrian relief effort.

    Baroness Williams of Trafford
  3. 'We have dragged our feet'

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Kennedy of SOuthwark

    Shadow minister Lord Kennedy of Southwark offers a damning assessment of the UK and the EU's response to the refugee crisis.

    He says there have been many failures and where there have been responses they have been "piecemeal".

    "We have dragged our feet" he concludes.

    He therefore welcomes reports such as the one being debated tonight for putting pressure on the government to act.

  4. 'A shameful indictment'

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dems Baroness Sheehan describes her own experience in Calais during the demolition of the "jungle".

    She says she witnessed "appalling treatment of minors" and tells of children having to spend the night sheltering under a bridge "in no mans land".

    This, she argues, is a "shameful indictment of the two richest countries in the world".

    Baroness Sheehan
  5. Government should 'turn human tragedy into a national asset'

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    baroness afshar

    Crossbencher Baroness Afshar argues that by accepting refugee children the government can turn a "human tragedy into a national asset".

    Noting that it is the most enterprising children who will have survived the journey to the UK she argues that it is not altruism but "self-interest that demands we accept these children". 

    She says the children coming to the UK should not be labelled a burden but "a harbinger of our future".  

  6. Refugee children should be allocated an 'independent guardian'

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Janke

    Lib Dem Baroness Janke welcomes the government's plan to produce a safeguarding strategy for refugee children.

    She urges the government to take up the report recommendation to allocate each child their own independent guardian.

    She tells peers that this strategy has been successful in Scotland.

  7. A modern Oliver Twist?

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Soley wonders if there is "a Charles Dickens" in the country who is currently writing an updated version of Oliver Twist based on the refugee crisis.

    He suggests that if there is such a novel "those involved in delaying the taking in of children" will feature "rather badly".

    One of the "villains" who, he proposes, would feature in the hypothetical novel would be newspaper editors who he accuses of having stirred up hatred.

    He urges the editors to spend a week of their holiday at one of the refugee camps - "they may learn a degree of humility".

    Lord Soley
  8. 'The mark of a civilised society'

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Cormack tells peers that he understands the "scare stories" about the age of refugees being brought in to the country.

    He says that in "this age of terrorism" the government has a duty to carefully vet those coming in.

    However he argues that it is "the mark of a civilised society" to give the benefit of the doubt to unaccompanied children.

    Lord Cormack
  9. Labour peer says there are '85,000 unaccompanied child refugees in Europe'

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Dubs says there are "still believed to be some 85,000 unaccompanied child refugees in Europe".

    Many of those have gone missing, he says, and many remain in vulnerable situations.

    Lord Dubs successfully campaigned for an amendment to the Immigration Bill in April allowing for unaccompanied child migrants to be brought to the UK where they do not have family links but are considered to be at risk.

    He asks whether the Dublin principles will still apply "when we are out of the EU".

  10. Peer condemns 'culture of disbelief and suspicion'

    Debate on unaccompanied migrant children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Prashar

    Baroness Prashar attacks what she describes as a "culture of disbelief and suspicion" towards child refugees.

    "At its most offensive," she says, this attitude appears in newspapers "and in the remarks of some politicians". Tory MP David Davies call for child migrants' teeth to be tested was called unethical by the British Dental Association.

    Baroness Prashar calls the comments "absurd".

    Some will try to "play the system", she says, but the majority are "vulnerable children".

    She adds that those who see the Brexit vote as a choice to "pull up the drawbridge... could not be more wrong". The UK signed up to the Dublin principles on refugees, as a sovereign state in 1990, she tells the House.

  11. Debate on unaccompanied migrant children begins

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    MPs agree to pass the Pension Schemes Bill at second reading. It will be considered in detail by a committee of the whole House at a later date.

    The final business today concerns a report from the European Union Committee entitled "Children in crisis: unaccompanied migrant children in the EU".

    Crossbench peer Baroness Prashar, who chairs the EU Home Affairs Sub-Committee, opens the debate.

    She criticises the government for only responding to the committee's report shortly before the debate began, meaning she had no time to "digest" the response.

  12. Minister describes pension debate as 'a four-hour masterclass'

    Pension Schemes Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Young of Cookham

    Replying to the debate for the government, Lord Young of Cookham says Labour's Lord Hunt recalled previous ministerial experience.

    "Two can play at that game," Lord Young says. "I was a minister in the DHSS, as it then was, from 1979 to 1981." He jokes that things have changed a little since then.

    "We've just had a four-hour masterclass in pensions policy," he tells peers.

    He describes former pensions minister Baroness Altmann as "the midwife" of the Pension Schemes Bill and adds that he is sorry that she is not winding up the debate. Baroness Altmann resigned from the government in July.

    Turning to concerns raised during the debate about pension scheme deficits, Lord Young says a government green paper this winter will, he hopes, "inform debate" on pension deficits and whether government intervention is right.

  13. Opposition supports the bill but hightlights 'concerns'

    Pension Schemes Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

    Labour spokesman Lord Hunt of Kings Heath says "the plight of women in particular who are disadvantaged in health and wealth" needs to be addressed.

    He says the deficit in the pension scheme of collapsed retailer BHS has shown up "poor corporate behaviour".

    Lord Hunt says Labour supports the bill but the debate has highlighted concerns, such as whether the "scheme member protection in the bill is robust".

  14. Lib Dems call for action on pension scams

    Pension Schemes Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Bakewell of Hardington Mandeville now speaks on behalf of the Lib Dems.

    She welcomes the bill but, like many peers in the debate, she emphasises the need to drill down to the detail of the bill.

    For example, she asks the government to provide more detail about what would happen to a pot of money in a master trust which had its authority withdrawn. 

    She also calls on the government to use the bill as an opportunity to tackle cold calls and pension scams.

  15. Drake: It is too easy to set up a master trust

    Pension Schemes Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Drake tells peers that master trusts grew at a speed that no one anticipated - "0.2 million members in 2010 to well over four million in 2016".

    She expresses shock at how easy it was to set up a master trust with founders merely having to send a form to HMRC.

    She argues that competition cannot deliver an effective market because savers on the demand side do not have enough power - "the worker doesn't choose the product".

    Baroness Drake
  16. End of the day in the House of Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Transport Minister Paul Maynard finishes his reply to tonight's adjournment debate and that's it for the day in the Commons.

    MPs return tomorrow at 11:30am for Cabinet Office questions followed, of course, by Prime Minister's Questions at midday.

    The main business of the day is two opposition debates picked by the Labour Party, the first on community pharmacies, the second on police officer safety.

  17. 'There needs to be change' - witness

    Sharia councils

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Committee witnesses

    "There is discrimination going on and there needs to be change," says Khola Hasan from the Islamic Sharia Council.

    Sharia council panellist Amra Bone agrees that "there needs to be improvement". She claims there has not been discrimination at her council but women have come to them from other councils and complained of it.

    Ahmad Al Dubayan, chairman of the UK Board of Sharia Councils, says he has seen cases in which the councils "were unfair about their decision" but that is out of many decisions made.

    Later, vice chairman Mizan Abdulrouf says that, in Islam, "divorce is the most hated of the permissible", so Sharia councils need to verify that a marriage has broken down.

    However, he adds, if a woman tells them "I don't want to go back to that pillock, end of story, that is end of story".

  18. MPs send Investigatory Powers Bill to the Lords

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons has sent the now re-amended Investigatory Powers Bill back to the Lords, who will have to agree to the bill in its current form - or send it back to the Commons, in the process known as "ping pong". 

    But we're very close to the end of the day's sitting in the Commons, as Cannock Chase MP Amanda Milling is introducing today's adjournment debate, on the Chase railway line in the West Midlands.

    The Chase line connects Rugeley in Amanda Milling's constituency to Walsall. She says trains at peak times are delayed, overcrowded, and many passengers dodge their fares due to a shortage of ticket inspectors.

    She says: "Chase line passengers deserve better."

    London Midland operates trains on the Chase Line.
    Image caption: London Midland operates trains on the Chase Line.
  19. 'Law of the land takes precedence over your own religious laws'

    Sharia councils

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative MP David Burrowes says there is "a concern about the rise of polygamy".

    Mizan Abdulrouf says: "Does Islamic law allow polygamy? Yes it does. I'm not going to shy away from that."

    But he adds: "People have to understand the law where they live. The law of the land takes precedence over your own religious laws."

    Another Conservative, Nusrat Ghani, asks Amra Bone from Birmingham Central Mosque if she thinks a woman can have more than one husband in some interpretations of Islam.

    "That's totally up to a woman," Ms Bone replies. "If she wants to, it's up to her."

  20. Altmann: Savers could lose their entire pension

    Pension Schemes Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former pensions minister Baroness Altmann tells the House that when she joined the government she was "taken aback" to discover that protection for master trusts had not been put in place before auto-enrollment was rolled out.

    She says that members of such schemes could lose their entire pensions if their scheme winds up.

    She therefore welcomes the bill but says peers must undertake detailed scrutiny to ensure that regulations will work in practice. 

    Baroness Altmann