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Summary

  1. Transport questions first item of business in Commons
  2. Urgent question on UK terrorist Jamal Al-Harith
  3. Business Statement next
  4. DUP debate on armed forces and unaccompanied children in Greece and Italy
  5. Lords met at 11am for questions
  6. Main business is Health Services Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill and Neighbourhood Planning Bill

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Ben Butcher and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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  1. Tomorrow in the House of Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones ends the day with the governments view on HS2. He says the government has met people in the area and "will continue to do so", with HS2 open to a variety of route options.

    MPs return at 9:30am tomorrow.

    A number of private member's bills are lined up for discussion, but most of the day will likely be spent debating the Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence Bill. 

  2. Adjournment debate on HS2 'havoc' in Derbyshire

    Adjournment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Dennis Skinner

    Labour's Dennis Skinner introduces his debate on the high speed rail project in Newton, a village in Derbyshire. 

    Mr Skinner represents the area and says that the rail project will bring "havoc" to the area. 

    Campaigners argue that the line would see homes demolished and adversely affect house prices in the area. 

    HS2 has said they are committed to working with the local community to address their concerns. 

  3. Child refugees vote deferred

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs will defer the vote on the backbench business motion on child refugees in Greece and Italy until Wednesday 1st March. 

    The motion calls on the government to "continue to monitor" local authority capacity for the possible transfer of unaccompanied refugee children from camps in Europe.

  4. Abbott: government has not given MPs what they voted for

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Diane Abbott

    Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott says the government had "fallen far short from what members in both houses thought they were voting for."

    She says that claims made by some MPs during the debate that mainland European countries are safe for refugees are incorrect, citing a report by Amnesty International

    "The hallmark of a country is the fairness and the humanity and the way it treats the vulnerable," she says, before finishing "we plead with the government to fulfill it's legal and moral obligations"

  5. Tory backbench offers various views on child refugees

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tory backbench

    The debate has demonstrated a variety of beliefs and interpretations of the government's policy on child refugees on the Conservative backbench. 

    Conservative David Burrowes believes that the UK has not ripped up the Dubs amendment, but has revised its "timeslot" according to changing conditions. 

    However, fellow Tory Will Quince says that he was "sad and disappointed" to see that only 150 more child refugees would be taken in. 

    He believes the UK is "pulling up the drawbridge" and challenges the government to regularly consult local governments to see if new spaces come up. 

    Across the House, there has been agreement that the UK's aid and humanitarian response within Syria and its neighbours has been positive. 

  6. Bone: policy on refugees correct

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Peter Bone

    Conservative Peter Bone says one of the former prime minister's greatest legacies was on human trafficking.

    He says that those who engage in the practice are "the most evil people in the world." 

    He says David Cameron's policy to look after the displaced in their region was correct, as it lessens incentive to find safety in Europe, reducing the need for traffickers. 

    Mr Bone was previously the chair of the all-parliamentary group on human trafficking .   

    He also suggests that the money required to look after 3,000 refugees in Europe could be used to care for 800,000 in the Middle-East.  

  7. Morgan: government needs to be clearer on numbers

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Nicky Morgan asks for the government to be "clearer" with numbers as there are a lot of schemes creating confusion. 

    She also asks for the government to push councils and local authorities to "clarify" spaces. 

  8. Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords

    The last group of amendments are withdrawn and debate of the legislation is adjourned...

    ... as is the day in the House of Lords.

    Peers are back on tomorrow to debate bills on homelessness and abortion. 

  9. Latham: people being too 'sentimental'

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Pauline Latham says that policies which involve helping migrants in Europe create more issues than they solve. 

    She says the safety and quality of refugee camps in home regions are good, thanks in part to British aid, and that in the long-term migrants will prosper more staying in the Middle-East.

    She finishes by saying "although I understand the sentiment of what people say, we should stop being so sentimental and we should actually be looking at what the best thing to do for these families and children and that is to keep them in the area."

  10. Cox: UK must show 'moral self-worth and dignity'

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Geoffrey Cox

    Conservative Geoffrey Cox gives an impassioned plea for the UK to show "moral self worth and dignity" in order to protect its international reputation. 

    "When you have the plight of a child, it transcends these kinds of complexities of pull factors and push factors," he says, criticising some of the lines taken in the debate.

    He says the UK's "obligations" were only for a "modest few", not all 30,000 child refugees estimated in Europe. 

    "Suffer the little children and forbid them not to come unto me," he says in conclusion, to the applause of some SNP MPs. 

  11. BreakingGovernment defeated on planning amendment

    Neighbourhood Planning bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have voted to accept the Lib Dem amendment 113 votes to 107.

    The next group of amendments deal with the restrictions on powers to impose planning conditions. 

  12. Cooper: government shouldn't 'rip up' good work

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Yvette Cooper

    Chair of the Home Affairs Committee Yvette Cooper says the government has "pulled the plug" on the Dubs amendment. 

    Despite it only being in place for just six months she says it was "saving lives and helping children" and says evidence had shown it was "reducing dangerous illegal journeys." 

    She says that the government "has done some good things, don't rip it up now."

    Conservative Pauline Latham intervenes to suggest that the French should be dealing with child migrants in Calais, not the UK - "France isn't an unsafe country," she says. 

    Yvette Cooper agrees that the French could do more, but the key is "co-operation" with both France and the UK sharing the load. 

  13. Peers vote on planning permission conditions

    Neighbourhood Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are now voting on amendment 18.

    This Lib Dem amendment would ensure that local authorities can go as far as the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) allows in relation to pre-commencement conditions. 

    The amendments would also allow a local authority to go beyond the NPPF with the consent of the person who applied for planning permission.

    The NPPF sets out the government's planning policies for England and how it expects those polices to be applied.

  14. Minister: UK is 'fully committed' to helping child refugees

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Robert Goodwill

    Home Office Minister Robert Goodwill states the "government is absolutely and fully committed to helping and supporting the most vulnerable children"

    He notes that the government aims to remove the risk of unaccompanied children making perilous journeys across the Mediterranean, hence the bulk of funding and refugee relocation is focused on Syria and its' neighbours. 

    He says 5,400 Syrian refugees and 350 child refugees have arrived in the UK since October 2015. 

    He says the Dubs amendment did not specify nor did it legally bind the government to a number, and that the new number of 350 came from consultation with local authorities.

    The SNP's Margaret Ferrier intervenes to say that Glasgow City Council has expressed a willingness to take more child refugees. Yesterday the Home Affairs Committee heard evidence that a number of councils had spare capacity. One, Hammersmith and Fulham, said it had been trying to fill two spare slots for child refugees since October last year.

  15. McGovern: child refugees are not a party political issue

    Backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Child refugees

    Labour's Alison McGovern opens the second debate of the afternoon by saying the subject of child refugees is "not a party political issue."

    However, she criticises the recent decision to cancel the so-called Dubs amendment scheme , "slamming the door shut" after taking in just 350 child refugees out of a proposed 3,000. 

    She asks the government to admit that the "pull" of a legal route to Britain was not the issue causing children to make their way to Europe, but "war and famine" in the Middle-East. 

    The cross-party backbench motion praises the UK's aid efforts in Syria, but criticises the government's slow response to re-housing child refugees, in particular from Greece and Italy. 

    In 2015 alone an estimated 90,000 unaccompanied children and teenagers sought asylum across Europe. 

  16. Minister: current system is 'disproportionate'

    Opposition day debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister

    Northern Ireland Minister Kris Hopkins summarises by saying the "rule of law applies to all", but acknowledges that the current system is "disproportionate" in its treatment of soldiers and policemen.

    He says that the "full and faithful implementation of the Stormont Agreement" will help address this.

    The Stormont House Agreement will create a number of new agencies including the Historical Investigations Unit that will examine unsolved murders carried out during the Troubles.

  17. Watch again: DUP MP recalls cousin's death

    Video content

    Video caption: DUP MP Jim Shannon recalls the death of his cousin in the Troubles, during a speech about the prosecution of historical cases among the armed forces.