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Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Esther Webber and Ben Butcher

All times stated are UK

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  1. MPs back business relief changes

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs vote 319 to 275 in favour of a motion enabling the government to make changes to business investment relief under Chapter A1 of Part 14 of the Income Tax Act 2007.    

    Chapter A1 related to limits on liability to income tax of non-UK residents.

  2. MPs vote on changes to business investment relief

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs divide to vote on a motion enabling the government to make changes to business investment relief under Chapter A1 of Part 14 of the Income Tax Act 2007.  

  3. Treasury minister says Labour may become obsolete

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Gauke

    Chief Secretary to the Treasury David Gauke says the Budget shows "determination to face up to long-term challenges".

    He says some jobs may become outmoded "including those in the Labour Party" but it is not the government's job to "preserve the old by stifling the new". 

    He highlights measures in the Budget aimed at improving skills. 

  4. Labour mocks chancellor's National Insurance plans

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Peter Dowd

    Shadow chief secretary to the Treasury Peter Dowd winds up for Labour, arguing "the chancellor got it wrong big-time". 

    He says No 10 and No 11 have been in "a briefing war" over the proposal to raise National Insurance, and it's "worrying" that ministers don't know their own manifesto. 

    Challenged by Conservative Sir Oliver Letwin over how Labour would find the money for social care, he replies: "Fiscal rectitude!" 

  5. Lib Dem: No mandate for grammar schools

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lib Dem Sarah Olney says there's "no mandate" for grammar schools and "no evidence" they help social mobility.

    "Choice is no good to parents of children at schools already facing funding cuts," she adds. 

  6. Skidelsky: Austerity has slowed growth

    Budget debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Everyone recognises that austerity has slowed down the growth of economy, says the crossbencher Lord Skidelsky.

    "Except the front bench," he adds.

    He suggests that if George Osborne had continued the policies of the Labour chancellor Alistair Darling "he would have left Mr Hammond with a nice surplus."

  7. Care system 'only just managing'

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Helen Whately

    Conservative Helen Whately says in her constituency "it feels like the care system is only just managing".

    She welcomes the announcement of funding for social care in the Budget, and proposed changes to tax arrangements. 

    "We will all get old and we all do need to contribute to pay for that," she tells MPs.

  8. Lord Desai: Self-employment a form of tax-dodging

    Budget debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Desai

    Labour's Lord Desai says that self-employment can often be used to "tax dodge", with companies telling well-paid employees to become self-employed to avoid tax. 

    He says that we have to get over the idea that all self-employed are the "backbones of society" and that they should be totally removed from tax rises. 

  9. Budget measure undermine conservative values

    Budget debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative former minister Baroness Altmann says that the government is introducing a "stealth death tax" through it's increase in the probate tax.

    She also claims the National Insurance increase for the self-employed is self-defeating, as it will discourage individuals from starting their own businesses. 

    She says these and other measures outlined in the Budget undermine core conservative principles of fairness and entrepreneurship.

  10. MP calls whisky duty rise 'a money grab'

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Docherty-Hughes

    The SNP's Martin Docherty-Hughes uses his speech to call excise duty rises outlined in the Budget "a money grab" which will damage the whisky industry. 

    He attacks it as "ill-thought-out" and urges the chancellor to review the decision.

  11. Lord Monks: 'hearts are ruling heads'

    Budget debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Monks

    Labour's Lord Monks says that "hearts are ruling heads" in the current political climate.

    He says the former president Bill Clinton's mantra 'it's the economy, stupid' was no longer being seen with reference to "hard Brexit" and the proposed second Scottish referendum. 

    He says that we have "enough problems without self-inflicted ones", adding that failure to tackle zero-hour contracts and leaving the single markets are examples of this.  

  12. 'Astonishing' Conservatives didn't see National Insurance row coming

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Eagle

    Labour's Maria Eagle says it's "astonishing" nobody involved in preparing the Budget saw that it went against commitments not to raise National Insurance.

    It was the platform on which all Conservatives campaigned and yet "none of them noticed", she continues.

    "I wouldn't have expected they'd all forget about it." 

  13. Austerity 'is living within one's means'

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Graham Evans says opposition MPs like to use the term "austerity", but "I call it living within one's means". 

    He goes on to say he's "a little disappointed" at duty rises affecting beer, saying it should be split into two tiers according to alcohol content. 

  14. Chancellor criticised for lack of infrastructure plan

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Anna Turley

    The Labour MP for Redcar, Anna Turley, says there was "no mention of the North East in the Budget" and the chancellor failed to set out a plan on infrastructure and industry, which she believes would have helped the region. 

  15. Is there more hate crime on social media?

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Social Media

    Committee chair Yvette Cooper summarises by asking if there has been a rise in hate speech on social media.

    Facebook's Simon Milner says that figures suggest there might be an increase in "polarisation" and more time is spent on the issue from a day to day basis than it used to be. 

    "One thing we know about Twitter, is that it reflects what is going on in the real world", says Nick Pickles, citing Brexit, the refugee crisis and others as sources of tension. 

    YouTube's Peter Barron says that social media organisations are putting more resources into getting people to report, so this might explain why there appears to be. 

  16. Macpherson: Chancellor should stick to his guns on NI rise

    Budget debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Macpherson

    Former Permanent Secretary at the Treasury Lord Macpherson tells peers that he has worked on 34 Budgets.

    He says that if there is any pattern to Budgets it is that "those which attracted the greatest opprobrium on the day turned out to be the most sensible with hindsight".

    He also says that his time at the Treasury taught him that there are certain "no-go areas" when it comes to tax: residential property tax, inheritance tax and the self-employed.

    He recalls trying, unsuccessfully, to convince then Chancellor Lord Lawson to raise national insurance rates on the self employed.

    He urges the chancellor to stick to his guns on his proposals to raise National Insurance .

  17. Wage slowdown 'thanks to Brexit'

    Budget debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hain

    Labour's Lord Hain notes that the Office of Budget Responsibilty (OBR) has downgraded growth for the next four years.

    He adds that "thanks to Brexit" pay will increase slower and prices will rise faster that previously thought.

    "If this is the chancellor's idea of economic rigor, what is his idea of economic cirrhosis?" 

  18. Facebook trying to eliminate fake news

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Facebook's Simon Milner says the income from fake news is "negligible", but says they are working to eliminate it entirely. 

    He says they were doing everything "humanly and technically possible to get this stuff off our platform" and to eliminate it. 

  19. Conservative MP attacks National Insurance increase

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Richard Drax

    Conservative Richard Drax says the amount raised by a National Insurance increase for the self-employed will be "relatively pitiful" and his party has broken a manifesto promise.

    He also condemns inheritance tax, calling for it to be abolished. 

    On the Labour benches an MP can be heard to say: "He inherited Dorset."

  20. Economy debate begins

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe

    Peers now begin a debate on the economy in the light of the Budget Statement. 

    Business Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe opens the debate by noting that the UK is in a better position than many predicted.

    However she sounds a note of caution adding that growth in consumer demand will slow as inflation rises.

    It is right, she says, that the UK gets itself in position of readiness "to handle difficulties that come our way".