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Summary

  1. Business Committee investigates future of work
  2. Foreign Office questions in Commons at 11.30am
  3. Statement at 12.30pm on situation in Northern Ireland
  4. MPs consider amendments to Neighbourhood Planning Bill
  5. Debate on Yemen
  6. Peers assemble at 2.30pm for questions
  7. Will examine domestic violence bill and Criminal Finances Bill

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber, Julia Butler and Kate Whannel

All times stated are UK

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  1. Medical research debate concludes

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The debate on medical research concludes and that is where we have to leave our coverage of the House of Lords.

    Tomorrow peers start at 3pm for oral questions followed by debate of the Digital Economy Bill.

    There is also likely to be a repeat of the Prime Minister's statement on the triggering of Article 50.

  2. 'Please don't point at me'

    Medical Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords

    Government spokeswoman Baroness Buscombe tells peers that the government would welcome an agreement to continue collaboration with EU partners. 

    She says she is coming to the end of her speech at which point Lord Hunt complains that she has not addressed the issue of drugs funding for the NHS.

    Baroness Buscombe says that the debate is about maintaining medical research at which point Lord Hunt begins gesticulating from his seat.

    "Please don't point at me" she replies.

    She offers to write to him on the subject.

  3. Cap will have 'a devastating impact' on patients

    Medical Research debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

    Labour's Lord Hunt of Kings Heath says Nice was designed to speed up the introduction of innovative new treatments. 

    Now, he says, the government is using Nice as a rationer of treatments.

    He argues that the £20m cap will have "a devastating impact" on patients. 

    At the heart of the problem, he says, is that the pharmaceutical sector will no longer invest in new drugs if the NHS does not take up the results of that investment.

  4. Lib Dem peer expresses concern about drugs cap

    Medical Research debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Walmsley

    Lib Dem Baroness Walmsley expresses concern about the £20m cap being placed on new drugs .

    She says patients could die whilst waiting for Nice (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) to decide if it can pay for the drugs needed.

    She asks the government to conduct an early review of the impact of the cap.

  5. Scientists need 'a freer rein'

    Medical Research debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Ryder of Wensum uses his speech to call for the closing of a loophole in EU legislation.

    The loophole, he says, prevents pharmaceutical companies from trialing cancer drugs on children "despite evidence that it could help patients."

    He expresses the hope that when the UK leaves the EU the government will give scientists "a freer rein".

  6. Peers debate medical research

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Medical research

    Debate on the Criminal Finance bill is adjourned and peers begin a one hour debate on the UK and medical research.

    Lib Dem Lord Sharkey opens the debate by telling peers that the UK is a leader in the field of medical research. 

    He expresses concern that Brexit could undermine this position; specifically he says there is anecdotal evidence that recruiting EU researchers has become more difficult. 

    He urges the government to ensure that the UK will continue to collaborate with the EU.

  7. Amendment would create 'a perverse incentive'

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords

    Home Office Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford suggests that the amendment could create a "perverse incentive" to whistleblow.

    She argues that genuine whistleblowers are not usually motivated by money.

    Baroness Kramer agrees that whistleblowers are not motivated by money. She argues that compensation should be provided because whistleblowers' careers are often ruined when they speak out.

    Baroness Kramer says she is "obviously" going to withdraw the amendment (amendments are not usually pushed to a vote at committee stage).

    However, she warns that "we are nowhere near coming to the end of this issue." 

  8. 'A bit of an overreaction'

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Faulks worries that the whistleblowing amendment is "a bit of an overreaction".

    He expresses concern that setting up a new body, as the amendment proposes, would create "substantial bureaucracy".

    Labour's Lord Kennedy also expresses concern about setting up a new office to support whistleblowers. However, he agrees that further protections for whistleblowers should be enshrined in law.

  9. Libor whistleblowers have been treated 'atrociously'

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Kramer

    Lib Dem Baroness Kramer now speaks to her amendment, which would provide compensation for whistleblowers.

    She tells peers that she has spoken to two whisteblowers from the Libor scandal  and says they have been treated atrociously.

    She argues that "meaningful non-discretionary incentives" are needed in order to establish a successful whistleblowing culture.

  10. Minister: UK 'hostile environment for illicit financial activities

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Williams of Trafford

    Home Office Minister Baroness Williams tells peers that in 2015-16 £255 million pounds of illegal money was recovered under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002.

    The actions of the money laundering supervisors help to assure that the UK is a "hostile" environment for "illicit' financial activities, she says. 

    She urges amendments be withdrawn. 

  11. Conservative peer criticises anti-money laundering system

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hodgson

    Conservative peer Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts supports the amendments and says anti-money laundering regulations in this country lack "effectiveness and follow-through".

    "Billions of illegal money" is passing through London every year, he adds. 

  12. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons adjourns for the day and returns tomorrow at 11.30am for international development questions before questions to the prime minister at midday. 

  13. Labour peer: Money laundering 'key enabler' of organised crime

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Rosser

    Labour's home affairs spokesman, Lord Rosser, says money laundering is a "key enabler" of serious and organised crime. 

    He says the effectiveness of the anti-money laundering system in the UK is a "key and crucial issue" which this bill seeks to address, but adds that it does not. 

  14. Minister pays tributes to Burngrange mining disaster victims

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mordaunt

    Work and Pensions Minister Penny Mordaunt joins tributes to those killed in the Burngrange mining disaster. 

    She says health and safety regulations have "improved greatly" but there is more work to be done to ensure mine operators protect their workers at all times.   

  15. Peers debate anti-money laundering supervision

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem peer Baroness Hamwee rises to move an amendment to the Criminal Finances bill. 

    The amendments is concerned with anti-money laundering supervision.

    The amendment states that the secretary of State must by regulations amend the Money Laundering Regulations 2007 to require the supervisory authorities to annually publish their enforcement statistics. 

    Supervisory bodies should be "fully independent" and focussed on "transparency and accountability", she says. 

    Baroness Hamwee
  16. MP marks Burngrange mining disaster

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Bardell

    Tonight's adjournment debate is from the SNP's Hannah Bardell, on health and safety in the mining industry.   

    She begins by reading out the 15 names of men killed in the Burngrage mining disaster in 1947, saying she "cannot imagine how the families felt". 

  17. Minister: Yemen war 'not intractable'

    Yemen conflict debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ellwood

    Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood echoes earlier concerns about fighting intensifying in more populated areas and in the port of Hodeidah. 

    But he insists the conflict is "not intractable and there is a path to peace", with the UK "committed" to finding a way forward. 

    He demurs from earlier suggestions the UK should move towards neutrality, saying this would ally us with Al-Qaeda. 

  18. Minister rejects foreign ownership amendment

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford is unwilling to support the amendment.

    She argues that there is "nothing inherently suspicious" about having a financial interest in an overseas country.

    Conservative Lord Faulks fears the government is "missing an opportunity" to address the issue and urges the minister to check that there is no operational gap in police powers.

    Despite these objections he withdraws his amendment.

  19. Labour: We can act in Yemen

    Yemen conflict debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry deplores that Yemen is "engulfed" in hunger, telling MPs: "We can do something about it tomorrow." 

    She asks for assurance that Emergency Relief Co-ordinator Stephen O'Brien is leaving by agreement and not because of Saudi objections.