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Summary

  1. House of Commons returns from Easter recess
  2. Treasury questions first item on agenda
  3. Two statements: first one forthcoming business in the Commons
  4. Second statement from Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson on Syria
  5. Main business of the day is discussion of Budget measures
  6. MPs on Culture Committee take evidence on Brexit

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

  1. MPs to vote on early general election

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leader of the House David Lidington has told the Commons that MPs will be asked to approve a motion for an early general election.

    The motion will be put “under the terms of the Fixed Term Parliaments Act 2011”, Mr Lidington said.

    Shadow Commons leader Valerie Vaz said Mr Lidington’s statement explained why the government had not revealed the date of the next Queen’s Speech.

    On Tuesday morning the prime minister announced plans to call an election, to take place on 8 June.

    The vote in the Commons to approve the election plan needs two thirds of MPs to vote in favour. The debate will start after Prime Minister’s Questions.

  2. Video content

    Video caption: What happened the day the PM called for a General Election?

    UK Prime Minister Theresa May announced plans to call a snap general election on 8 June - and caught people by surprise.

  3. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That's it from the House of Commons for this evening.

    Business begins tomorrow from 11:30am with Scotland questions.

    At noon, Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn face each other for their penultimate Prime Ministers Questions clash before the general election.

    After that, a motion will be put before MPs to enable that election to be called.

    Other business includes consideration of Lords amendments to the Technical and Further Education Bill.

  4. Minister insists support is available

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Penny Mordaunt

    Work and Pensions Minister Penny Mordaunt says there is help available for people "who want to live independent lives", including local authority support, free prescriptions and travel allowances.

    She says the "work-related activity component" of the Employment and Support Allowance was intended as an "incentive" when introduced by Labour.

    Shadow work and pension secretary Debbie Abrahams intervenes to press her on exactly what support will be available to claimants.

    Ms Mordaunt responds that this "depends on an individual's circumstances" while adding that some forms of support are "available to all claimants".

  5. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Neil Gray

    Finally today, SNP MP Neil Gray opens an adjournment debate on "mitigating support for the Employment and Support Allowance work-related activity group".

    Mr Gray says the group includes "sick and disabled people who are, as of now, receiving £30 less per week" as a result of a cut in benefits to this group.

    The group consists of people who have been found unfit for work but able to take part in a "work-related activity" such as a training scheme or interviews.

  6. Bill passes its second reading

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The bill passes second reading by 313 votes to 236.

  7. SNP amendment defeated

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP amendment is defeated by 314 votes to 54 - a majority of 260.

    "Recount!" shouts someone.

    The House divides again to vote on whether to allow the bill to pass second reading and continue its progress through Parliament.

  8. Vote on SNP amendment opposing the bill's progress

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are voting on an amendment tabled by the SNP which "declines" to give the Finance (No. 2) Bill a second reading.

    The motion attacks measures announced in the March Budget, which it calls "a wholly inadequate response to the economic challenges being faced by Scotland and the UK".

  9. A ticking off for noisy MPs

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons

    Financial Secretary Jane Ellison closes the second reading debate.

    More MPs have arrived in the chamber, as a vote is expected, and Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing intervenes to tell them to be quiet while the minister speaks.

    Ms Ellison says the government is "prepared to face up to" economic challenges and also to tackle childhood obesity with the soft drinks levy.

  10. Labour spokesman attacks 'poor' government performance

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jonathan Reynolds

    The wind-up speeches begin with shadow economic secretary Jonathan Reynolds.

    The Labour spokesman tells those MPs remaining that "other events" may have overshadowed the Commons debate today, but thanks them for their contributions.

    "This is a poor government," he says, accusing the Conservatives of creating "a crisis in living standards" and of underfunding public services.

    The Finance Bill offers "very few tangible improvements on that poor level of performance", he claims.

    In addition, Mr Reynolds tells the House: "We have been presented with an almost impossibly tight timeline in which to scrutinise and discuss it."

  11. Tory MP: 'We must learn to live within our means'

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Victoria Atkins

    "We must always continue to get public spending under control," says Conservative MP Victoria Atkins, who accuses Labour MPs of believing in "a magic money tree".

    She adds: "We have, sadly, a debt of nearly £1.7tn which equates to almost £62,000 for every household in the country.

    "We're spending more money on debt interest than we're spending on defence and policing combined, which is why we must learn to live within our means."

  12. Speaking up for millennials

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Kirsty Blackman

    "I'm one of the 39 MPs who is a millennial," says SNP MP Kirsty Blackman, speaking in support of "generational fairness".

    A millennial is often considered to be someone who reached adulthood around the turn of the 21st Century.

    "A lot of my peers are worse off than their parents' generation was," Ms Blackman says, adding that many struggle to afford housing and may delay having children for financial reasons.

    "In terms of the government looking forward to future tax take, that's a real issue for a few years down the line," she argues.

  13. 'Sugar tax' debate

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP James Davies speaks in support of "the soft drinks industry levy" aimed at the producers of drinks that are high in sugar.

    He argues that the measure is "not regressive" and will benefit people on low incomes.

    Labour MP Stephen McCabe is more sceptical and thinks the measure could "fail to bring about the lasting change in consumption habits of the public that we all hope for".

    He claims that a sugar tax in Mexico only led to a short-term drop in the consumption of sugary drinks.

    He is followed by Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg, who opposes the tax in theory and practice.

    "I don't think it's the job of the government to tell me how much sugar to give to my children," he says.

    "The tax system is not there to tell people how to live their lives."

  14. SNP outline opposition to bill

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Scotch whisky bottles
    Image caption: The duty paid on Scotch whisky is due to increase by 3.9%

    The SNP's Treasury spokesperson Stewart Hosie is speaking to introduce his party's reasoned amendment to the Finance Bill.

    A reasoned amendment is a way of opposing a bill while providing reasons for doing so. The SNP's amendment says the party opposes the bill because it continues austerity, doesn't provide an economic stimulus to deal with Brexit, doesn't support the oil and gas industry and increases the duty paid on Scotch whisky. 

    The amendment calls the bill a "wholly inadequate" response to the "economic challenges" facing Scotland and the UK.

  15. Government accused of favouring 'the super rich'

    Finance (No. 2) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Peter Dowd

    Shadow Treasury minister Peter Dowd recalls "the chancellor's shambolic u-turn" on increasing National Insurance contributions for some self-employed workers.

    Philip Hammond abandoned the policy days after the Budget, facing a backlash by Conservative backbenchers who accused him of breaking a general election manifesto commitment not to put up National Insurance, income tax or VAT.

    Mr Dowd similarly accuses the prime minister of making u-turn on her declaration that she would not call a general election.

    He says the government is offering tax breaks "to corporations and the super rich" while small business owners "who are the life-blood of this economy, are increasingly fleeing the pressure".

  16. Finance (No. 2) Bill second reading begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jane Ellison
    Image caption: Financial Secretary to the Treasury Jane Ellison opens debate on the bill

    The Finance (No. 2) Bill would enable the government "to amend the law relating to the national debt and the public revenue".

    It follows the Budget in March and sets out income tax rates and corporation tax rates, among other measures.

    MPs are taking part in a debate on the bill as a whole. It will be considered in detail at a later date.