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Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel and Esther Webber

All times stated are UK

  1. G4S executives 'ashamed' by Panorama revelations

    Report from today's Home Affairs Committee session

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Executives from the security firm G4S have said they were ashamed by revelations of abuse at an immigration detention centre run by the company.

    They were appearing before MPs on the Home Affairs Committee, who condemned the firm's management of Brook House Immigration Removal Centre, near Gatwick Airport.

    The executives were accused of failing to "get a grip" and overseeing major failings at the centre.

    The chair of the committee, Yvette Cooper, told them it was a matter of "very grave concern" that the company appeared to have failed to stop staff misbehaviour following earlier revelations of mistreatment at a young offenders' unit.

    The committee also heard evidence from a former G4S duty director at Brook House, who said he had raised concerns about staff and management culture in institutions run by the company between 2001 and his resignation in 2014.

    Nathan Ward told the MPs that he was "not surprised but shocked" at the level of abuse revealed in the BBC Panorama film.

  2. Debate on terror attack witnesses begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Patrick Grady

    SNP Patrick Grady now begins his adjournment debate on witnesses of terror attacks overseas.

    The MP raises concerns that while bereaved families and those who were injured were granted information about the inquest, those who witnessed the attack were not.

    He quotes one of his constituents who was caught up in the Tunisia attacks: "We felt completely abandoned."

    Minister Rory Stewart tells the house that the trauma of witnessing an attack can be very long lasting.

    He says the government has learned lessons from the Tunisia attack.

    He tells MPs that the government set up a bespoke mental health programme for victims of terrorist attacks.

    The debate concludes as does the day in the House of Commons.

  3. Minister: Reviewing requirement for councillors to publish their address

    Abuse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chris Skidmore

    Cabinet Office Minister Chris Skidmore tells MPs that the government regularly meets social media companies to discuss online abuse.

    He adds that the recently passed Digital Economy Act requires a code of practice to be established by social media companies.

    One issue raised in the debate was the fact that councillors have to make public their address and the minister tells MPs that the Cabinet Office is reviewing this requirement.

    He finishes with an emphasis on the importance of protecting the democratic process.

  4. Do the police have the resources to tackle abuse? asks Labour MP

    Abuse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Abuse must never be viewed as the price to be paid for political involvement, says Opposition spokeswoman Chi Onwurah.

    She asks how the government is ensuring that the police have the resources they need to fully investigate online abuse.

    She adds that the volume of abuse on social media prevents MPs from seeing what their constituents think about an issue.

    Neverthless, she concludes, it is the best job in the world.

  5. McMahon: There is a cultural problem in the police

    Abuse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim McMahon

    Labour's Jim McMahon suggests that there is a cultural problem in the police when it comes to dealing with abuse.

    He argues that there is a feeling of "that's politics".

    He tells MPs that after being regularly harassed by an opponent in the shops with his children he was told by the police to "shop elsewhere".

  6. Swire: Len McCluskey's comments lead to 'whirlwind of abuse'

    Abuse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Hugo Swire argues that it is incumbent on politicians to be careful with the language they use.

    He criticises Unite leader Len McCluskey for calling for illegal strikes. He argues that those comments feeds into a sense that people have been "cheated" because they didn't "get the result they wanted".

    "That feeds into a whirlwind of abuse online."

  7. Lib Dem questions MP's 'Cruella de Vil' description

    Abuse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ian Liddell-Grainger

    Conservative Ian Liddell-Grainger uses his speech to attack the actions of the "rotten borough" of Taunton.

    During the speech, he refers to a particular civil servant as "Cruella de Vil".

    Lib Dem Jo Swinson wonders if this is appropriate during a debate on abuse.

    "If she understood the civil servant involved she'd probably join me," replies Mr Liddell- Grainger.

  8. Labour MP criticised for his election campaign

    Abuse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Pauline Latham

    Conservative Pauline Latham attacks Labour MP Chris Williamson, who is not in the chamber, for his actions during the general election.

    She accuses him of giving out misinformation about the former Conservative MP Amanda Solloway.

  9. MP criticises George Osborne's 'freezer' comments

    Abuse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Cat Smith

    Labour spokeswoman Cat Smith says that cuts in police officer numbers may mean that abuse against MPs is not fully investigated.

    She tells MPs that "cuts have consequences" and that has led to "pressures to downgrade crimes".

    She also criticises former chancellor George Osborne who reportedly said he would not rest until the Prime Minister is "chopped up in bags in my freezer".

  10. Teacher told class not to speak to my child - Conservative MP

    Abuse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Bob Stewart

    MPs now begin a debate on abuse of candidates and the public during the general election.

    Home Office Minister Sarah Newton says there have been shocking incidents of abuse directed towards MP.

    Bob Stewart tells MPs that during the last election a teacher at his son's school told the class that nobody should talk to him because he is the son of a Conservative MP.

  11. Summary: national funding formula announcement

    Statement from Education Secretary

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The government's long-awaited national funding formula will include a minimum per-pupil funding amount for both primary and secondary schools.

    The Education Secretary, Justine Greening, told MPs primary schools will get at least £3,500 for every pupil from 2019/20.

    It follows the £4,800 per pupil funding guarantee for secondary schools announced in July.

    Every school in England will also receive a lump sum of £110,000 to help with "fixed costs", and there's also a £26m fund to help "rural and isolated" schools to manage their "unique challenges".

    Justine Greening told MPs in the Commons: "The formula will replace the outdated funding system which has seen children have very different amounts invested in their education purely because of where they were growing up."

  12. Brake: Time for a teachers' pay rise

    Schools funding statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tom Brake

    Lib Dem Tom Brake says teachers in his London constituency struggle with the high cost of living.

    He suggests that it is now time for a proper pay rise for teachers.

    Justine Greening says that the teachers pay review board made recommendations which she accepted.

    In July, teachers' pay in England and Wales was restricted to increases of below 1%.

  13. Will schools see a real terms cut, asks Labour MP

    Schools funding statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Louise Ellman seeks a guarantee that no Liverpool school will receive a real terms cut.

    She also seeks a guarantee that the discretion given to local councils will not lead to councils taking the blames for any cuts.

    Justine Greening says that all members of the House will get a breakdown of how the funding will impact schools in their area.

    She says that she expects MPs will talk to their local authorities about how the national formula is reflected locally.

  14. 'This is social justice in action,' says committee chair

    Schools funding statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Education Committee Chair Robert Halfon "strongly welcomes" the formula.

    This is social justice in action, he says. He asks how the pupil premium helps disadvantaged children.

    Justine Greening says the government is "steadily understanding" what works to help children who are falling behind.

  15. Government is 'sneaking out the policy'

    Schools funding statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angela Rayner

    Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner begins by accusing the education secretary of "sneaking out the policy" on the last day before recess.

    She notes that Justine Greening said per pupil funding would increase for each school in cash terms

    However she asks for a guarantee that no school will be "a penny worse off" in real terms.

    She expresses concern that the money announced today has been found by "cutting elsewhere to fill in the black hole created by the government".

    Justine Greening says she has challenged her civil servants to work more efficiently in order to put more money into the front line services.

  16. Previous formulae 'unfair'

    School funding formula

    Justine Greening

    Education Secretary Justine Greening criticises the previous formulae for being opaque and "manifestly unfair".

    The new formula will set a minimum per pupil funding level - £4,600 per secondary school pupil and £3,300 per primary school pupil.

  17. Justine Greening announces 'historic' reforms to school funding

    School funding formula

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Greening

    MPs are now being given an update on the school funding formula, which Education Secretary Justine Greening says for the first time will be calculated according to schools' needs.

    There will be a minimum per-pupil funding level and at least £3,500 per pupil in primary schools.

    She describes the change as a "historic" one, which will address "manifest unfairness" in the current system.

    She confirms a previously announced £1.3bn for schools in England over the next two years.

    A National Funding Formula was announced by Education Secretary Justine Greening in 2016, but complaints about funding shortages have continued.