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Live Reporting

By Esther Webber, Aiden James and Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

  1. Boris Johnson safe for now despite latest diplomatic fumble

    Ben Wright

    BBC political correspondent

    Boris Johnson

    On the day George Orwell's statue was unveiled outside the BBC's Broadcasting House, it seems fitting that the government finds itself fending off accusations it has distorted and misrepresented the English language for political expediency in a way that would make the writer fume.

    Boris Johnson is in hot water, again, over what he said to a meeting of the Commons foreign affairs committee last week.

    Read more.

  2. Commons adjourns for a short recess

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons adjourns for a few days' recess and will return on 13 November.

    MPs' agenda for next week includes the budget for Northern Ireland, where talks to restore the power-sharing executive have failed, and committee stage of the EU Withdrawal Bill.

  3. Isle of Man 'responsible for own fiscal matters'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stride

    Financial Secretary to the Treasury Mel Stride responds to the concerns outlined by Dame Margaret Hodge, paying tribute to her as a "determined campaigner".

    He says the government takes all allegations of tax avoidance and evasion "very seriously".

    He points out that the Isle of Man has "separate democratic institutions responsible for their own fiscal matters".

    Mr Stride notes that the Isle of Man is conducting a review of VAT and the importation of aircraft, which he welcomes.

    He further observes that journalists have not turned over details of the Paradise Papers requested by HM Revenue and Customs.

  4. The island that swapped donkey rides for offshore cash

    Jon Kelly

    BBC News Magazine

    Isle of Man

    It was still dark when the private jet began its descent. Inside, its decor was sumptuous, the black leather seats piped with red, but outside rain was falling and the temperature on the ground below was a bracing 2C. The date was 21 January 2013, and the island that the plane was heading towards hadn't yet woken up.

    The candy-red Challenger 605 aircraft carried the registration G-LCDH - the initials of Lewis Carl Davidson Hamilton, the World Championship-winning Formula One driver.

    The previous month, Hamilton had flown on the jet with his then-girlfriend, the former Pussycat Dolls singer turned X Factor judge Nicole Scherzinger, and their families, to Hawaii for a Christmas holiday. The aircraft’s latest destination wasn’t so celebrated as a hang-out of the rich and famous.

    It wasn't Monaco or Miami Beach. It wasn’t Dubai. It wasn’t even the Channel Islands. It was the Isle of Man, the Crown Dependency between Ireland and Great Britain best known for its tail-less cats and its motorcycle race.

    Read more.

  5. Margaret Hodge: Lewis Hamilton should not receive a knighthood

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hodge

    Labour's Dame Margaret Hodge opens her adjournment debate on tax arrangements on the Isle of Man.

    She says a series of leaks have revealed "how the super-rich use nefarious, unethical and sometimes criminal means to avoid paying their taxes".

    She claims this wrongdoing is "not just ignored or condoned but only made possible by our rules" which means the UK is the "place of choice for every ne'er-do-well".

    She alleges that Lord Ashcroft was "motivated by selfish greed" while Lewis Hamilton "should not receive a knighthood".

    It recently emerged via the Paradise Papers documents that Formula 1 champion Lewis Hamilton avoided tax on his £16.5m luxury jet by importing the Bombardier Challenger 605 to the Isle of Man in 2013.

    Dame Margaret also calls for transparency from the Duchy of Lancaster which, she judges, would have avoided damage to the Queen's reputation.

  6. Deputy Commons leader thanks parliamentary staff

    General debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Deputy Commons Leader Michael Ellis responds to the general debate for the government, thanking MPs for raising a range of causes.

    He takes the opportunity to thank the police for their service, particularly those working on road traffic accidents, and all the staff of the Houses of Parliament.

    "There's a lot which is positive to refer to before the short recess," he emphasises.

  7. Labour laments lack of legislation

    General debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Opposition spokeswoman Karin Smyth welcomes the chance to hold a debate but criticises "the absence of government legislation".

    She says while she won't be going on holiday during the mini-recess, and jokes that, compared to the international development secretary, "all future family holiday planning for myself [will be] a whole lot easier".

  8. Conservative MP defends tampon tax recipient

    General debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Fiona Bruce returns to concerns raised yesterday by Labour's Paula Sheriff about money given to the group Life from VAT on tampons.

    She rejects the description of Life as "anti-choice", saying they "seek to give women a genuine choice" on abortion.

    She adds that the money given to Life is "dwarfed" by the sums given to abortion providers.

    She goes on to discuss the Care Quality Commission, which she says has a wide range of concerns about how Marie Stopes performs abortions.

  9. A short break for peers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords adjourns for a mini-recess until Monday.

    On their return next week, peers will debate the European Union (Approvals) Bill and continue their consideration of the Data Protection Bill.

  10. 'What do you have to do in this government to get sacked?'

    Statement: International development secretary

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Priti Patel
    Image caption: Labour says Priti Patel must be investigated over her Israel trip or resign

    International Development Minister Lord Bates repeats the answer to the earlier Commons urgent question about his boss, Priti Patel.

    The international development secretary apologised on Tuesday for holding 12 meetings while on a private trip to Israel, including one with Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu.

    Liberal Democrat spokeswoman Baroness Sheehan says Ms Patel has broken the ministerial code and should go.

    Lord Bates tells peers that "lessons will be learned".

    Labour peer Lord Robertson, a former cabinet minister, asks: "What do you have to do in this government to actually get sacked?"

  11. MPs take part in general debate before recess

    General debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now move on to a general debate on matters arising before the short recess.

    Conservative Bob Blackman is first to speak - and he addresses topics including the Jubilee Line, sale of public assets and police numbers in the capital.

    He also comments on the centenary of the Balfour declaration, saying links between the UK and Israel "grow ever stronger".

  12. Another call for Boris Johnson to apologise

    Islamic State statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean

    Labour's Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean says that Earl Howe's description of Boris Johnson's "drew very specific attention" to Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe during his appearance before the Foreign Affairs Committee.

    She criticises Earl Howe for a description of Mr Johnson's comments that she regards as "verging on the disingenuous".

    Mr Johnson must "write to the select committee with an apology for mis-speaking," the Labour peer says.

  13. Former Labour minister urges Johnson to 'correct the record'

    Islamic State statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Labour cabinet minister Lord Reid says that Boris Johnson has an opportunity to correct his comments to the Foreign Affairs Committee, which he made last week.

    Mr Johnson told the committee that Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe "was simply teaching people journalism, as I understand it, at the very limit".

    Earlier, the foreign secretary told the House of Commons he was sorry if his words were "so taken out of context" as "to cause any kind of anxiety".

    The UK government had "no doubt" Ms Zaghari-Ratcliffe was on holiday when she was arrested in 2016, Mr Johnson added.

    "We can all mis-speak, we know that," Lord Reid, a former defence secretary and home secretary, tells the House of Lords.

    "The opportunity is there to change that record by correction."

    The former minister says he does not understand why Mr Johnson has not done so - and failure to do so "will compound the initial problem".

    For the government, Earl Howe says Mr Johnson "has been as keen as anybody to emphasise to the Iranians that there are humanitarian grounds for the release of our dual nationals".

    He adds that the foreign secretary "may indeed have mis-spoken and I will put that to him".

  14. Minister: Councils have 'strong' powers to deal with substandard housing

    Temporary accommodation debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jones

    Communities and Local Government Minister Marcus Jones winds up proceedings by telling MPs that "all homes should be of a reasonable standard" and local authorities already have "strong powers" to deal with substandard accommodation.

    He says the government has an "ambitious programme" to address homelessness, focused on preventing the circumstances of people losing their homes in the first place.

    He notes that the use of bed and breakfasts has "begun to reduce" but says there is no room for complacency.

    He undertakes to look at how landlords can be incentivised to offer longer leases.

  15. Committee ends

    Home Affairs committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Yvette Cooper MP

    Chair Yvette Cooper thanks Cressida Dick for her "thoughtful answers" to the committee's questions.

    She asks the Met Commissioner to pass their thanks to her staff for all they do in "keeping us safe".

  16. Labour says 120,000 children will be homeless at Christmas

    Temporary accommodation debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow housing secretary John Healey responds to this afternoon's debate, and starts by expressing disappointment "it has been badly squeezed for time".

    He goes on to say: "It should shame us all that 120,000 children this Christmas will have no home."

    He says that too often temporary accommodation is not temporary but can last up to 10 years, and can be substandard and sometimes dangerous.

  17. Former Lib Dem leader: Boris Johnson should go now

    Islamic State statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Campbell

    Former Liberal Democrat leader Lord Campbell says he "will not be as charitable" as Labour's Lord Collins when it comes to Boris Johnson's conduct.

    "Whatever he says now, the damage has been done," the Lib Dem peer tells the House of Lords.

    Mr Johnson has announced that he will go to Tehran for talks about imprisoned British-Iranian woman Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe.

    However, Lord Campbell thinks Iran's Republican Guard which, he says, are behind Ms Zaghari-Ratcliffe's detention, "is unlikely to be impressed".

    The foreign secretary "has annoyed our allies and embarrassed our friends" and "should never have been appointed", Lord Campbell says.

    Echoing the views of many MPs earlier in the day, he says Mr Johnson "should go now".

  18. Dick: Met Police 'relies hugely' on counterparts in Europe

    Home Affairs committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Cressida Dick is asked by SNP MP Stuart McDonald about Brexit and how important "access to EU justice and institutions" is to the Metropolitan Police.

    Met Commissioner Dick says the Met Police "relies hugely" on its counterparts in Europe but that her organisation is "not going to get involved" in any politics or negotiations regarding Britain's exit from the European Union.

    Cressida Dick