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Summary

  1. Peers to debate bill abolishing by-elections for hereditary peers
  2. They will then discuss use of body cameras by police officers in mental health units

Live Reporting

By Ryan Brown

All times stated are UK

  1. Thanks for joining us

    With that, the week's business is over.

    We'll be back on Monday for more from the House of Commons, House of Lords and committee rooms.

  2. Labour Peer brings an end to a 'most moving' debate

    Mental Health Units Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour Peer Baroness Massey of Darwen

    Baroness Massey of Darwen calls the debate "most moving" and hopes the family of Seni will see the debate as a "tribute".

    She says the House has done "justice" to a "serious and important" issue. She hopes progress moves on "rapidly".

    The Labour peer is of the view that violence never "solves anything at all" and there is a need for a different approach through training, discussion and sympathetic listening to patients.

    The Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill passes its second reading and the House adjourns.

  3. Labour peer opens Seni's law debate

    Mental Health Units Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Massey of Darwen introduces the second reading debate on the Mental Health Units Bill.

    The bill was inspired by the case of Olaseni Lewis, known as Seni.

    The 23-year-old, from South Norwood, in London, died in September 2010, days after he fell unconscious while being restrained by 11 Metropolitan Police officers at Bethlem Royal Hospital.

    The measures aim to better govern the use of force in relation to patients in mental health units - and make those who use force more accountable.

    It would require police officers to wear body cameras while carrying out restraint unless there are legitimate operational reasons for not doing so.

    Any non-natural death in a mental health unit would automatically trigger an independent investigation under the plans.

    Labour MP Steve Reed, who brought forward the legislation in a private member's bill, said it was Mr Lewis's legacy and would prevent anyone else going through what he and his family had been through.

  4. Labour Peer calls for 'more democracy'

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour Peer Lord Adonis

    Lord Adonis moves amendment 35A allows the public to appoint peers from the register when a hereditary vacancy occurs.

    The Labour peer says he is not proposing the amendment as a "serious proposition" but "apologetically" moves it.

    He says the amendment asks if the second chamber should move from a nominated/hereditary house to an elected house. He states that the House of Lords should carry on "modernising".

    He calls for "more democracy" and devolution. He says there is "greater urgency" after Brexit and the constitutional reform involved.

    He adds there is "intense discontent" at the state of government.

    He concludes that these issues cannot be "swept under the carpet" by "tiny incremental changes" such as Lord Grocott is proposing.

    Lord Grocott dismisses the amendment as "silly" and Lord Adonis withdraws the amendment.

    And with that, the Lords moves on to its next business.

  5. Amendment on party balance after the abolition of hereditary peers rejected

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord True's amendment 33A is not passed.

    Contents: 21

    Not Contents: 73

    Majority: 52

  6. Peers divide on Lord True's amendment

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The chamber has divided on Lord True's amendment 33A, recognising that more hereditary peers are Conservative than Labour and attempting to maintain that balance after the passage of the bill.

  7. Amendment aims to deal with party balance in Lords

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Peer Lord True

    The Earl of Caithness withdraws his amendment and Lord True moves amendment 33A. The amendment deals with replacing the number of hereditary peers with the same party to maintain the balance of the House.

    The Conservative peer says that there is a "grotesque" over-representation of the Liberal Democrats in the chamber and that it is a "more glaring" matter in the management of democracy than the by-elections of hereditary peers. He will raise the question again at report stage.

    He is asked if there is an over-representation of "white, privileged, well-off, middle-class men".

    Lord True says he does not do "identity politics".

  8. Earl of Caithness 'provoked' into moving his amendment

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Earl of Caithness

    The Earl of Caithness says he has been "provoked" into moving his amendment 32 and says he does not want to preserve the by-elections "in perpetuity".

    The Conservative and hereditary peer says the amendment is an example of trying to "improve" the by-election system. The amendment makes all members of the House of Lords eligible to vote in the elections.

    Lord Trefgarne asks Lord Grocott to support his private member's bill regarding parity between the sexes in the inheritance of peerages.

    The Earl of Caithness welcomes the idea.

  9. Lord Northbrook moves his third amendment

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Peer Lord Cormack

    Lord Northbrook moves amendment 17 dealing with the royal officials Lord Chamberlain and Earl Marshal. The families involved in these roles will change after the current reign of the monarch ends.

    Conservative peer Lord Cormack says that these positions are not subject to by-elections and therefore the amendment is redundant.

    Lord Grocott asks why these ceremonial positions should be in the House of Lords.

    Lord Northbrook withdraws the amendment.

  10. Barnier: Chequers Brexit proposal not dead

    Adam Fleming

    Brussels reporter

    Michel Barnier

    The EU's chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier has sounded some positive notes on the UK's plans about the future relationship with the EU.

    The UK Brexit Select Committee has published a transcript of their evidence session with the chief negotiator in Brussels in Monday.

    Mr Barnier said there were positive elements of the UK's Chequers proposal, but he had concerns with the concept of a single rulebook for the trade in goods and a Facilitated Customs Arrangement - a position he has stated publicly several times.

    He said there would not be a series of mini-deals with the UK in the event of no overall Brexit deal.

    He said there had been no negotiations about the future relationship with the UK because the discussions so far have been about the political declaration that will spell out its general shape.

    He and his deputy Sabine Weyand also spelt out more details about their approach to "de-dramatising" the Irish border issue, namely that the two sides should discuss the location and technicalities of specific checks.

    The EU negotiators said they were happy for the UK to compete with the EU in future, but the level of divergence would affect the UK's level of access to the single market.

  11. Lord Northbrook's moves his amendment 16A

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Peer Lord Northbrook

    Amendment 16A deals with the by-election procedure and hereditary peers after the Burns report is adopted. It means that a hereditary peer can remain a member for a fixed term for 15 years and allows a by-election after that period.

    Lord Grocott says this would make an exception for hereditary peers.

    Lord Colgrain says as an elected hereditary peer he feels more "democratically represented" than other members of the Lords.

    The amendment does not pass.

  12. Lord Northbook's amendment 15 is not passed

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Northbrook's amendment 15 is defeated.

    Contents: 19

    Not Contents: 107

    Majority: 88

  13. The House divides on Lord Northbrook's amendment 15

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The chamber has divided on Lord Northbrook's amendment calling for hereditary replacements to have fairer representation from Northern Ireland and Scotland.

  14. Lord Trefgarne's amendment 11 is not passed

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Trefgarne's amendment 11 supporting the continuation by-elections is defeated.

    Contents: 23

    Not Contents: 117

    Majority: 94

  15. Peers divide and tellers are provided

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Trefgarne moves amendment 11 and the House divides. There are calls for tellers from both sides and this time they are provided.

  16. Amendment calls for representation for Northern Ireland and Scotland

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Northbrook rises to move amendment 15, which provides that future hereditary vacancies be filled in a way that gives fair representation to Northern Ireland and Scotland.

    Labour's Lord Grocott asks him to "save words" and confirm that the amendment will mean the continuation of by-elections.

    The Conservative peer says he supports the continuation of by-elections.

  17. Crossbencher says he is 'deeply ashamed' by the proceedings

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Berkeley of Knighton

    Lord Grocott asks that Lord Trefgarne withdraw his amendment as it will "ensure" that the by election system will continue and adds that if the Conservative peer will not, Lord Grocott hopes he will no longer "abuse the procedures of the House".

    Lord Berkeley of Knighton says that he is embarrassed to have invited a young political student to the proceedings. The crossbencher urges the government to "seize the nettle" and says it is "disgraceful" that Lords are trying to advantage one section of society over another.

    He adds he is "deeply ashamed" by the debate.

  18. Tellers not appointed for the contents not appointed

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A division cannot take place on Lord Trefgarne's amendment because no tellers are appointed for the contents.

    Lord Adonis does not move his amendment regarding a second elected chamber.

    Lord Trefgarne moves his second amendment.

  19. Minority of peers accused of 'filibustering' the bill

    Hereditary Peers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour Peer Lord Grocott

    Labour's Lord Grocott says the chamber has not "covered ourselves in glory" in the last 45 minutes.

    He accuses a small minority of peers of "filibustering" a bill that had overwhelming support at second reading.

    The Labour peer says that in the last "absurd" by-election, there were seven candidates for three peerages. He adds those who oppose this bill support these by-elections.

    He calls the process of by-elections a "ridiculous assisted scheme" and says someone who inherits a title has a 1/211 chance of becoming a member of parliament through the Lords. For the rest of the public, he approximates it is a 1/70,000 chance.

    He asks peers to "desist" their opposition.