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Summary

  1. AMs pass a motion that "the decision on whether to go ahead with the proposed M4 corridor around Newport project should be left to the new first minister"
  2. Committee members discuss promoting the Welsh language
  3. Plenary begins at 1.30pm with Questions to the Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Transport
  4. Questions to the Counsel General
  5. Debate on the Economy, Infrastructure and Skills Committee report: Selling Wales to the World
  6. Debate on the Culture, Welsh Language and Communications Committee report: Building Resilience, Inquiry into Non-Public Funding of the Arts
  7. Plaid Cymru debate - M4 Corridor Decision
  8. Plaid Cymru debate - Direct Farm Payments
  9. Short Debate: Swansea Parkway: the next steps for the Swansea Bay City Region?

Live Reporting

By Alun Jones and Nia Harri

All times stated are UK

  1. Swansea Parkway

    The topic chosen for the Short Debate by Suzy Davies (South Wales West) is "Swansea Parkway: the next steps for the Swansea Bay City Region?"

    She sets out the benefits of a new railway station, for people in the city and the whole region.

    Suzy Davies
  2. Motion on direct farm payments amended

    The Plaid Cymru motion on direct farm payments is amended by the Welsh Government and by the Conservatives.

    The amended motion is passed with 28 for, no abstentions and 21 against.

  3. 'Pledge to continue to support farmers to keep them on the land'

    Rural Affairs Secretary Lesley Griffiths announced earlier this week that farmers' main cash subsidy will stay in place for an extra year.

    The payments in their current form were due to be phased out from 2020, as the UK leaves the EU.

    In a speech at the annual Royal Welsh Winter Fair in Builth Wells, the Welsh Government cabinet minister said existing subsidy schemes will not be replaced until new ones are ready.

    It follows "an overwhelming response" to a public consultation about changing the way farming and the countryside is funded after Brexit.

    The Welsh Government amendment is to delete all and replace with:

    1.Notes the UK’s decision to leave the EU in March 2019, including the Common Agricultural Policy and its system of farm support including the basic payment scheme.

    2.Supports the Welsh Government’s:

    a.pledge to continue to support farmers to keep them on the land and protect our communities;

    b.aim to design the best system for farm support in Wales, set out in the recent consultation on Brexit and our Land, including investment for food production and support for public goods; and

    c. guarantee that no changes to income support will take place without further consultation, no new schemes will be designed without a proper impact assessment, and no old schemes will be removed before new schemes are ready.

    3.Calls on the UK government to provide urgent confirmation that Wales will not lose a penny of funding for farming as a result of exiting the EU.

    4.Welcome the Welsh Government’s decision to maintain the basic payment scheme in 2020 as part of a multi-year transition.

    Lesley Griffiths
  4. 'I plead with the cabinet secretary not to move too fast'

    UKIP's Neil Hamilton says "I plead with the cabinet secretary not to move too fast, even though I do believe she's moving in the right direction".

  5. 'Number of farmers and productivity of farms has decreased' under CAP

    Conservative Andrew RT Davies, a farmer who voted Leave, moves an amendment that adds "under the Common Agricultural Policy, and during the course of the UK’s membership of the European Union, the number of farmers and the productivity of farms has decreased in Wales."

    He calls on the Welsh Government "to use the new powers coming from the UK's departure from the EU to create a farming and rural support scheme which serves the unique needs of the rural and agricultural economy in Wales."

    Andrew RT Davies
  6. 'Taking away their safety net'

    Farmers are "standing on a Brexit cliff edge and the Welsh Government is taking away their safety net", says Plaid Cymru's Llyr Gruffydd.

    Llyr Gruffydd
  7. 'Maintain an element of direct payments for farmers'

    The second Plaid Cymru debate is on direct farm payments.

    Plaid Cymru propose that the National Assembly for Wales:

    1. Notes the essential role that the basic payment scheme currently plays as a basis for the viability of the Welsh family farm, rural communities and the broader economy of Wales, and the importance of direct payments with regard to providing stability in periods of uncertainty.

    2. Calls on the Welsh Government to ensure that support for farming in Wales is targeted at active farmers who take financial risks related to food production.

    3. Calls on the Welsh Government to maintain an element of direct payments for farmers after Brexit.

    Farming
  8. Plaid Cymru motion passed

    The proposal that the National Assembly for Wales:

    Believes that the decision on whether to go ahead with the proposed M4 corridor around Newport project should be left to the new First Minister, appointed in December 2018, subject to the findings of the local public inquiry.

    is passed without objection.

  9. 'Subject to appeal and judicial review, almost certainly'

    The decision to enter into a construction contract will be for the new first minister, Julie James says.

    "It's a complex process. This is a process that will be subject to appeal and judicial review, almost certainly."

    She says she fully expects an incoming first minister to still hold a debate in the Senedd.

  10. Carwyn Jones will 'if at all possible' decide on the statutory orders

    Leader of the House Julie James says the Welsh Government will support the Plaid Cymru motion.

    She says Carwyn Jones will "if at all possible" decide on the statutory orders to permit the road. He is still waiting for officials' advice, and legal advice. When the first minister has done that, the public inquiry report will be published.

    The next first minister will be elected by Welsh Labour on December 6.

    Julie James
  11. Labour manifesto

    Mark Reckless asks Labour AM for Pontypridd why the M4 Relief Road was in the Labour manifesto when so many Labour members are opposed.

    Mr Antoniw says the commitment is not about a specific route.

  12. 'What doesn't help Newport is blowing £2bn on a piece of road'

    Labour AM for Llanelli Lee Waters says that if the statutory orders are not published by Carwyn Jones then the public inquiry report cannot be published.

    "The problem in Newport is that it is a car dependant city", he adds. "We need to help Newport. What doesn't help Newport is blowing £2bn on a piece of road".

    Lee Waters
  13. 'Such an important decision'

    UKIP's Neil Hamilton says the decision on the proposed M4 relief road is "such an important decision... it should be owned by the new first minister".

    Neil Hamilton
  14. 'More work needs to be done on alternative public transport options'

    Jenny Rathbone - currently suspended from the Labour party in the Senedd for remarks about Jewish people - supports the Plaid Cymru motion.

    She says "a lot more work needs to be done on alternative public transport options".

    Jenny Rathbone
  15. 'Allow successor to make the decision'

    Plaid Cymru's Rhun ap Iorwerth says that Carwyn Jones, who was been first minister for nine years, should allow his successor to make the decision.

  16. Welsh Labour leadership candidates' views

    Finance minister Mark Drakeford is favourite to succeed Carwyn Jones as Labour leader and first minister and is considered to be more sceptical of building the relief road.

    Mr Drakeford's leadership rivals, health minister Vaughan Gething and Welsh language minister Eluned Morgan, are said to be more open to the new route.

  17. 'Decision should be left to the new First Minister'

    Plaid Cymru have decided to use their hour, by holding two 30 minute debates.

    The first is on the M4 corridor decision.

    Plaid Cymru say "the decision on whether to go ahead with the proposed M4 corridor around Newport project should be left to the new First Minister, appointed in December 2018, subject to the findings of the local public inquiry".

    The Welsh Government wants to build a 14-mile (23km) six-lane motorway south of Newport, between Magor and Castleton.

    It says the current M4 is "not fit for purpose" and wants to relieve congestion on the current motorway around the Brynglas Tunnels - a bottleneck once described by former Prime Minister David Cameron as a "foot on the windpipe of the Welsh economy".

    Conservationists say the new M4 across "Wales' own Amazon rainforest" of the Gwent Levels would be a "direct attack on nature".

    Welsh Government
  18. Eight recommendations accepted, or accepted in principle

    Minister for Culture, Tourism and Sport Lord Elis-Thomas responds on behalf of the Welsh Government.

    Of the eight recommendations directed at the Welsh Government, they are all accepted, or accepted in principle.

    The response can be seen in full here.

  19. 'Partnership working between business and the arts'

    In the absence of committee chair Bethan Sayed (South Wales West) who is ill, Dai Lloyd presents the report which has 10 recommendations.

    Recommendation 1 is that "the Welsh Government should continue to provide financial support, whether through Arts and Business Cymru or otherwise, to promote and develop partnership working between business and the arts to help maximise financial support for the arts from business.

    "The Welsh Government should also consider how the specific difficulties faced by the arts sector in Wales in attracting funding from businesses can be addressed, and whether additional public investment in this area is needed to drive this work forward".