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Summary

  1. Plenary begins at 1.30pm with Questions to the First Minister
  2. Questions to the Deputy Minister and Chief Whip
  3. Statement by the Deputy Minister for Health and Social Services: The Children (Abolition of Defence of Reasonable Punishment) (Wales) Bill
  4. Regulations arising from the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union

Live Reporting

By Alun Jones and Nia Harri

All times stated are UK

  1. Hwyl fawr

    That brings today's proceedings in the Siambr to a close.

    Senedd Live returns tomorrow.

    Senedd
  2. Amend definition of 'money market fund'

    AMs approve the Local Authorities (Capital Finance and Accounting)(Wales) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019.

    This amends the definition of “money market fund” to omit a reference to European Directive2009/65/EC.

    Julie James, Minister for Housing and Local Government
    Image caption: Julie James, Minister for Housing and Local Government
  3. Welsh Tax Acts

    AMs pass the Welsh Tax Acts (Miscellaneous Amendments) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019.

    The Regulations:

    1. update an incorrect reference in Schedule 6 to the LTT Act to clarify that an obligation to transfer payment entitlements under the basic payment scheme of income support for farmers pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1307/2013 is not included as chargeable consideration on the grant of a lease for the purposes of land transaction tax (replacing a referencing to the predecessor “single payment” scheme under Council Regulation (EC) No 73/2009);

    2. amend Schedule 18 of the LTT Act to provide that, following the UK’s exit from the European Union, EU or EEA registered charities will no longer be able to claim charities relief from land transaction tax under Schedule 18 of that Act;

    3. provide that co-ownership authorised contractual schemes (“CoACS”) which are constituted, authorised and managed under the law of an EU or EEA State will no longer receive the same treatment as a UK-based CoACS following EU Exit (and amend section 36(8) of the LTT Act in consequence of this provision);

    4. amend the TCM Act to remove the restriction on a Member of the European Parliament being appointed as a non-executive member of the Welsh Revenue Authority; and

    5. make further technical and minor amendments to the TCM Act resulting from EU Exit.

  4. Measures to protect forestry in a no-deal Brexit scenario

    AMs pass the Plant Health (Forestry) (Miscellaneous Amendments) (Wales) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019.

    The Plant Health Directive contains measures to be taken in order to prevent the introduction into, and spread within, the EU of serious pests and diseases of plants and plant produce.

    These Regulations correct deficiencies in the following domestic legislation which implements EU Directive 2000/29/EC on measures to protect (forestry) plant health arising in consequence of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU in a ‘no deal’ scenario:

    Plant Health (Forestry) Order 2005

    Forest Reproductive Material (Great Britain) Regulations 2002

    Plant Health (Fees) (Forestry) (Wales) Regulations 2019.

  5. Marketing of seed potatoes

    AMs pass the Seed Potatoes (Wales) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019.

    Those Regulations control the production with a view to marketing, the certification and the marketing of seed potatoes in Wales, other than those intended for export outside the European Union.

  6. Trade in animals and related products

    AMs pass the Rural Affairs (Miscellaneous Amendments) (Wales) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019.

    These Regulations make amendments to subordinate legislation, which applies in relation to Wales, relevant to cattle identification; the trade in animals and related products; examination for residues and the maximum residue limits in respect of animals and animal products; transmissible spongiform encephalopathies; seed marketing and plant health.

    Minister for Environment, Energy and Rural Affairs, Lesley Griffiths
    Image caption: Minister for Environment, Energy and Rural Affairs, Lesley Griffiths
  7. Food and feed hygiene and safety

    AMs approve the Food (Miscellaneous Amendments) (Wales) (EU Exit) (No. 2) Regulations 2019.

    According to the Report of the Constitutional and Legislative Affairs Committee, "most of the provisions make minor technical changes to ensure that the Welsh regulations, which provide for the implementation of retained EU law relating to food and feed hygiene and safety, food compositional standards and labelling and food and feed regulated products, will continue to be operable and enforceable in Wales after the UK leaves the EU.

    "However, the amendments to the Natural Mineral Water, Spring Water and Bottled Drinking Water (Wales) Regulations 2015 also provide that from exit day, waters from the EU/EEA, like waters from other third countries, must be recognised as natural mineral water in Wales/the UK before they may be placed on the market in Wales."

  8. Regulation of social workers and social care managers

    AMs approve the Regulation and Inspection of Social Care (Qualifications) (Wales) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019.

    These Regulations make amendments to the Regulation and Inspection of Social Care (Wales) Act 2016 (the 2016 Act) relating to the regulation of social workers and social care managers in Wales. Amendments are also made to the 2016 Act relating to exclusions to the scope of regulated advocacy services, to amend references to European Lawyers, and to the Mental Health Act 1983.

  9. Regulatory requirements which apply to providers of certain services

    AMs pass the Regulated Services (Service Providers and Responsible Individuals) (Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2019.

    The 2017 Regulations set out the regulatory requirements which apply to providers of certain services regulated under the Regulation and Inspection of Social Care (Wales) Act 2016 (the 2016 Act).

    These are care home services, secure accommodation services, residential family centre services and domiciliary support services.

    The amendments include:

    • Regulation 4 makes a number of amendments to regulation 2 of the 2017 Regulations dealing with circumstances when a person is exempted from the requirement to register as the provider of a care home service.
    • Regulation 5 amends regulation 3 of the 2017 Regulations to stipulate that nursing care provided by a registered nurse does not come within the scope of activity of a domiciliary support service.
    • Regulation 8 adds a requirement to regulation 28 of the 2017 Regulations concerning a service provider’s policy and procedures for children’s savings.
  10. Arrangements to help children and young persons who want to make representations

    AMs pass the Regulation and Inspection of Social Care (Wales) Act 2016 (Consequential Amendments) Regulations 2019.

    Under section 178(4) and (5) of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, the Welsh Ministers are required to make regulations to make further provision about a local authority’s duty to make arrangements to help children and young persons who want to make representations.

    This applies to representations by children and young persons about a range of the local authority’s social services functions which affect children and young persons. These Regulations make provision about the categories of persons who, under the local authority’s arrangements, may not provide assistance to the child or young person.

  11. Providers of regulated adoption services

    AMs pass the Regulated Adoption Services (Service Providers and Responsible Individuals) (Wales) Regulations 2019.

    These Regulations are made under the Regulation and Inspection of Social Care (Wales) Act 2016 (“the Act”) and set out the regulatory requirements and related provisions for providers of regulated adoption services and for those persons who are designated as the “responsible individuals” for such services.

  12. Regulations arising from Brexit

    AMs are now discussing a series of regulations arising from the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union.

  13. 'I was both physically and emotionally abused by my adoptive mother'

    Independent AM Mandy Jones, speaking against a smacking ban, says "I was adopted as a baby, and throughout my childhood and as a young adult I was both physically and emotionally abused by my adoptive mother".

    She says she had "nightly beatings".

    She adds, "I know there is a night and day difference between abuse and a smack".

    Mandy Jones
  14. 'No more fit person on her benches to be the Member in charge'

    "I can think of no more fit person on her benches to be the Member in charge of this piece of legislation," says Plaid Cymru's Helen Mary Jones about Labour AM Julie Morgan who had campaigned for the change in the law before her party agreed to pass new legislation.

  15. Safeguards against needless prosecutions?

    UKIP's Gareth Bennett asks, "What safeguards will there be against needless prosecutions? There are potential problems of the police, the CPS ([Crown Prosecution Service] and social services dealing with a large increase in complaints".

  16. 'Absurd' that children do not have the same protection from physical punishment as adults

    Plaid Cymru's Sian Gwenllian welcomes the introduction of the bill, which she says has been Plaid Cymru policy for many years.

    She says it's "absurd" that children do not have the same protection from physical punishment as adults.

    Sian Gwenllian
  17. 'How are we going to police smacking ban?'

    Conservative Janet Finch-Saunders raises the concerns of campaigners that the law would criminalise ordinary parents.

    "How are we going to police our homes, are you not worried that this might drive families apart?," she asks.

    Janet Finch-Saunders
  18. 'Commitment to children's rights'

    Deputy Minister for Health and Social Services Julie Morgan says passing the bill would "send a clear message that the physical punishment of children is not acceptable in Wales".

    She says the bill builds on its commitment to children's rights under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

    But a consultation it conducted last year found opinion was divided.

    Of 1,738 people and organisations who responded, 50.3% thought it would protect children's rights but 48.1% thought it would not.

    The Welsh Government believes it will change a culture of physical punishment, with Mrs Morgan saying more than 50 countries have already responded to the call for this.

    Julie Morgan
  19. Statement by the Deputy Minister for Health and Social Services

    The only statement of the day is by the Deputy Minister for Health and Social Services Julie Morgan: The Children (Abolition of Defence of Reasonable Punishment) (Wales) Bill.

    A ban on smacking children is a step closer after the Welsh Government published the bill removing "reasonable punishment" as a defence.

    If passed by the assembly, it will be made law and children will have the same protection from physical punishment as adults.

    Smacking