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Summary

  1. Commons day began with questions to culture and media ministers
  2. Backbencher-led debate took place on the war in Yemen
  3. Future parliamentary business was announced by government whip Mark Spencer
  4. MPs also put questions to Attorney General Geoffrey Cox
  5. An urgent question was asked on investigation into abuse at Whorlton Hall hospital

Live Reporting

By Richard Morris

All times stated are UK

  1. MPs move on to adjournment debate

    Backbench adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons

    MPs now move on to a debate on "matters to be raised before the forthcoming adjournment".

    This is, fundamentally, an opportunity for MPs to raise issues or concerns before the Commons breaks for recess. It is a staple of the parliamentary calendar.

    We'll end our text coverage here, but you can continue watching on the live stream links of the Commons and Lords near the top of this page.

  2. Minister: There has been some progress in Yemen

    Backbench debate on Yemen

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Dr Andrew Murrison

    Foreign Office Minister Andrew Murrison thanks Keith Vaz for bringing this debate to the Commons, although he laments the lack of attendance of other members.

    "There has been some progress" in Yemen, and it is important "to find something positive to say". He says the "Stockholm Peace Process" has made steps in recent weeks.

    "One in three Yemenis rely on aid for their only source of food," he tells MPs.

    He says he is "proud of the amount of aid the United Kingdom has given to Yemen".

  3. UK 'now out of step' with the EU on arms sales to Saudi Arabia

    Backbench debate on Yemen

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Douglas Chapman

    SNP defence procurement spokesman Douglas Chapman says he and others have been "hugely" disappointed by some of the slow progress on the problems in Yemen.

    The UK is "now out of step with the rest of EU member states" by selling weapons to Saudi Arabia, he says, citing a report.

    "Someone, someday, will have to be around to clear up the mess that has been left behind" in the country, he warns.

    "At the front line of this crisis are women and children," he states.

  4. Yemen is not just one conflict

    Backbench debate on Yemen

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mike Gapes

    Change UK MP Mike Gapes says Yemen "has within it other conflicts" and it is not just the Yemeni president against the Houthi rebels.

    He says the United Arab Emirates "are a key player" in the coalition alongside Saudi Arabia.

    "There are elements in the south of Yemen which are linked to al-Qaeda," he tells MPs. "If there is no state of power, the vacuum is filled with non-state actors, including the extremist ones," he warns.

  5. 'Some reports' of child soldiers in Yemen

    Backbench debate on Yemen

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stephen Twigg

    International Development Committee chairman Stephen Twigg says that while April marked a decrease in Saudi airstrikes in Yemen, it saw an increase in fatalities.

    "There are some reports that there have also been children recruited by the Saudi-led coalition," the Labour MP says, raising concerns that both sides in the conflict are using under-age soldiers.

    He says he "very much agrees" with Keith Vaz that a "major rethink" is needed on selling arms to Saudi Arabia. He says selling arms to the Saudi government is "undermining" the government's claims to have strict checks on arms sales.

  6. Recent 'clear violation of international humanitarian law' in Yemen

    Backbench debate on Yemen

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrew Mitchell

    Former international development secretary Andrew Mitchell says there was a recent "clear violation of international humanitarian law" when a coalition airstrike killed and injured people in a residential area of Sanaa which had no military sites nearby.

    He asks the government what discussions have been recently had with the Emirati and Saudi foreign ministers on the situation in Yemen.

    "The longer this goes on, the more likely it is that an arms embargo will follow," he adds.It is a "failure" that the government has not been able to convince Saudi and Emirati allies to stop the strikes, he says.

  7. Keith Vaz opens debate on Yemen

    Backbench debate on Yemen

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Keith Vaz

    "We need to stop the bombing, and we need to stop the bombing now," says Labour's Keith Vaz, opening the backbench debate on Yemen.

    He says that the government needs to address the issue of arms sales to Saudi Arabia.

    "We must have an immediate ceasefire," he states, as people continue to lose their lives in the country.

    Mr Vaz says the US congress has been "more active" on the problems in Yemen than the British government "in some areas".

    "I beg him to stop the bombing and the killing," he says to government minister Andrew Murrison, "because this really is in our government's hands."

  8. Commons moves to backbench debates

    Backbench debates

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons

    MPs are now moving to the first of two debates selected by the Backbench Business Committee.

    The first is on the peace process in Yemen, and the second is a general adjournment debate before MPs break for the Whitsun recess.

  9. Government wants second reading on 7 June

    Business statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Spencer

    Mark Spencer says: "We do plan to publish the Withdrawal Agreement Bill in the week commencing 3 June."

    "We'd hope to hold second reading on Friday 7 June. At the moment we've not secured agreement to this in the usual channels."

    "We'll update the House when we return from recess," he adds.

  10. No sign of Withdrawal Agreement Bill in the Commons yet...

    Business statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Valerie Vaz

    Shadow leader of the House Valerie Vaz asks why is the bill not being brought forward now.

    She says that the "prime minister has become part of the problem" on Brexit and that "we are in Brexit paralysis".

    "The government has had three years, five major speeches, and red lines which never changed which have brought us to this situation," she tells MPs.

  11. Government unveils future business

    Business statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Spencer

    Government whip Mark Spencer is unveiling the upcoming business in the Commons.

    He's speaking on behalf of the government after Andrea Leadsom resigned as Leader of the House in dramatic fashion late last night.

    He pays tribute to Ms Leadsom, saying that she was "unfailing" in trying to change the culture in Westminster on proxy voting and other areas.

  12. 'Individuals responsible must be held to account'

    Whorlton Hall urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Norman Lamb
    Image caption: Norman Lamb has asked this urgent question

    Health Minister Caroline Dinenage tells MPs that what was shown on Panorama last night was not "caring" and the government is "utterly determined to address" the problems raised.

    Liberal Democrat Norman Lamb tells MPs that last night's programme was "deeply distressing particularly for any family who has a loved one in an institution".

    "Individuals responsible must be held to account," he says, as well as the provider. He accuses the system of care as being "outdated and wrong".

    Ms Dinenage says: "Society is very rightly judged on how we treat our most vulnerable citizens."

    "We are reviewing our whole entire autism strategy," she tells the Commons.

  13. Commons hears urgent question on care home abuse

    Whorlton Hall urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Whorlton Hall
    Image caption: Whorlton Hall in County Durham is at the centre of new abuse allegations

    The Commons moves on to an urgent question by Liberal Democrat MP and former health minister, Norman Lamb.

    He's asking the government about the revelations on BBC Panorama last night of abuse against those with special needs and learning difficulties at Whorlton Hall care home.

    The report by the BBC was published yesterday, and was shown on BBC One.

  14. Bercow wishes the best to retiring Clerk

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Philippa Helme
    Image caption: Philippa Helme (R) is retiring today

    John Bercow tells the Commons that it is the last day in Parliament for the Principal Clerk of the Table Office, Philippa Helme.

    She has worked in Parliament for 35 years, seven months and 20 days, he tells the MPs. He says he first got to know Philippa Helme when he joined the Welsh Affairs Committee.

  15. First outing as Solicitor General

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lucy Frazer

    The Commons now moves to Attorney General questions.

    Former justice minister, now Solicitor General, Lucy Frazer pays tribute to her predecessor, Robert Buckland, who is now himself a justice minister.

  16. Quieter morning on the green benches

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons
  17. Ministers 'expect' BBC to continue free TV licences

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There's a question from Labour MP Stephen Hepburn on whether free TV licences will continue for over-75s when the BBC gains responsibility for funding them.

    Government funding for free licences is due to end in June next year, and the BBC is currently consulting on whether it should continue to fund them.

    Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright says the corporation has not yet made a decision, but one is expected next month.

    He says the decision is for the BBC to make, but ministers have been "quite clear" that they "want and expect" the concession to continue.

  18. Thursday in the Commons

    Hello and welcome to our live coverage from Westminster – European elections are taking place today, but both houses of Parliament are still sitting.

    First up this morning, Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright will take questions from MPs as part of a scheduled departmental scrutiny session.

    Then it will be the turn of Attorney General Geoffrey Cox to take questions from MPs.

    After this, there will be an urgent question following an undercover BBC investigation into abuse and mistreatment of vulnerable adults at Whorlton Hall hospital.

    Following that, government whip Mark Spencer will announce future parliamentary business, in place of Andrea Leadsom, who quit the cabinet yesterday.