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Live Reporting

Alun Jones and Sara Down-Roberts

All times stated are UK

  1. Hwyl fawr

    That's it from the Siambr (Senedd chamber) for today.

    Senedd Live returns on Tuesday 10 March.

    Senedd
  2. 'Is obesity a disease?'

    The topic chosen for the Short Debate by Jenny Rathbone (Cardiff Central) is "Is obesity a disease?"

    She says, "It isn't just an inconvenience—obesity actually shortens your life by between three and 10 years.

    "Obesity prevents people from living well, and we spend 10 per cent of the NHS budget alone on supporting people with diabetes.

    "It doesn't just cause diabetes of the type 2 variety, but also cardiovascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, and heart failure, and many other things besides, including infertility, incontinence, depression, anxiety and asthma."

    weighing
  3. 'Distance from home is considered as a key factor'

    The Welsh Government amendment moved by Julie Morgan, Deputy Minister for Health and Social Services, is to delete all after point 1 and replace with a call on the Welsh Government to:

    a) ensure that distance from home is considered as a key factor for people who require specialist mental health in-patient support

    b) ensure robust arrangements are in place to monitor the quality and safety of placements in units in England, including collaborative working with the Care Quality Commission.

  4. 'Ensure all Welsh medium and high security mental health patients are placed in Wales'

    The Conservative amendment moved by Angela Burns is to delete point 3 and replace with a call on the Welsh Government to:

    a) ensure all Welsh medium and high security mental health patients are placed in Wales unless in exceptional circumstances;

    b) ensure sufficient medium and high security inpatient capacity for mental health services in Wales so that the outsourcing of care can be phased out;

    c) ensure that Health Inspectorate Wales and the Care Quality Commission collaborate so that mental health units outside of Wales who receive Welsh patients are complying with inspection requirements;

    d) introduce Senior Responsible Officers for medium and high security Welsh mental health patients to enable joint working between Welsh Health Specialised Services Committee and local health boards with a focus on the patient; and

    e) ensure that communication plans must be put alongside treatment plans for medium and high security Welsh mental health patients to manage the expectations of the patient, their families and clinicians.

  5. 'Ensure sufficient inpatient capacity for mental health services in Wales'

    The topic of the second Plaid Cymru debate is mental health services.

    Rhun ap Iorwerth moves the motion proposing that the National Assembly for Wales:

    1. Notes the concerns about quality of care raised by relatives of Welsh patients in inpatient mental health units in England.

    2. Believes that no patient experiencing mental health problems should be sent to units that are large distances from their family.

    3. Calls on the Welsh Government to:

    a) ensure sufficient inpatient capacity for mental health services in Wales so that the outsourcing of care can be phased out;

    b) have a plan for the repatriation of Welsh patients currently living in units in England;

    c) place a ban on the Welsh NHS using units in England that have poor reports from the Care Quality Commission;

    d) ensure that units outside of Wales receiving Welsh NHS money comply with Welsh inspection requirements.

    Rhun ap Iorwerth
    Image caption: Rhun ap Iorwerth
  6. 22 recommendations to improve services

    The Welsh Government has not tabled any amendments to the motion.

    Julie Morgan, Deputy Minister for Health and Social Services refers to the Welsh Government Eating Disorders Review published in November 2018, which provided a detailed analysis of current eating disorder services, outlined national and international evidence, and made 22 recommendations to improve services.

    She says that the review set out an ambitious analysis for how eating disorder services should look in Wales in the future, and that she is committed to ensuring that the services are shaped by the recommendations.

  7. 'Develop waiting times for adult and child services'

    Conservative Angela Burns says "the length of time to develop waiting times for adult and child services" is a matter of regret.

    Angela Burns
    Image caption: Angela Burns
  8. 'Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses with high mortality rates'

    Plaid Cymru has chosen to divide their allocated hour into two half hour debates.

    The first is on eating disorders.

    On her last day before going on maternity leave, Bethan Sayed moves the motion proposing that the National Assembly for Wales:

    1. Notes that Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2020 takes place from 2 March to 8 March and that the focus this year will be on the importance of empowering and supporting families and friends.

    2. Believes that:

    a) eating disorders are serious mental illnesses with high mortality rates;

    b) recovery is possible;

    c) families and friends can play a crucial role in supporting recovery.

    3. Commends those that worked on and participated in the Eating Disorder Service Review 2018 launched by the Welsh Government and its ambition to build a world-class eating disorder service for Wales which is accessible to all who need it.

    4. Believes that empowering and supporting families, friends and other carers will be essential to realising this ambition.

    5. Regrets the extended period of time it took for Welsh Government to respond to the outcome of the 2018 Service Review.

    6. Calls on the Welsh Government and health boards, local authorities and all other stakeholders to ensure full implementation of the Eating Disorder Service Review 2018 recommendations.

    Bethan Sayed
    Image caption: Bethan Sayed
  9. Welsh Governments support the Conservative motion

    The Welsh Government has not tabled any amendments to the motion.

    Julie Morgan, Deputy Minister for Health and Social Services, says the Welsh Government will support the Conservative motion but not the Plaid Cymru amendment.

    Julie Morgan
    Image caption: Julie Morgan
  10. 'Restricted contact can retain children in care for longer than necessary'

    Neil McEvoy (South Wales Central) has tabled a number of amendments, the first of which is that:

    a) a well-recognised route out of care is via good quality contact between looked after children and their parents;

    b) contact ought not to be reduced or restricted for the convenience of paid care providers; and

    c) restricted contact can retain children in care for longer than necessary.

    Neil McEvoy
    Image caption: Neil McEvoy
  11. 'Expectation on local authorities to set targets in order to address the problem is a superficial solution'

    The Plaid Cymru amendment moved by Sian Gwenllian calls on AMs to recognise "that there are complex reasons behind the increasing levels of children in care, but believes that the expectation on local authorities to set targets in order to address the problem is a superficial solution".

  12. 'The number of looked after children in Wales has risen by 34 per cent in the last 15 years'

    The topic chosen by the Welsh Conservatives for their debate is looked after children.

    Janet Finch-Saunders moves the motion proposing that the National Assembly for Wales;

    1. Notes the Public Accounts Committee’s report into care experienced children and young people and the Ministerial Advisory Group for Improving Outcomes for Children Programme’s Annual Report 2019.

    2. Further notes that the life chances of looked-after children and care leavers are significantly poorer than those children who are not in care.

    3. Regrets that the number of looked after children in Wales has risen by 34 per cent in the last 15 years, and that nearly 10 per cent of children in care have been in three or more placements.

    4. Calls on the Welsh Government to:

    a) urgently review local authority plans on reducing the numbers of looked-after children;

    b) assist local authorities in recruiting 550 Welsh foster families to cover the gaps found by the Fostering Network;

    c) investigate financial and rehabilitative support available to adoptive parents; and

    d) ensure the roll out of access to free positive parenting courses to be offered for all parents and guardians across Wales.

    Janet Finch-Saunders
    Image caption: Janet Finch-Saunders
  13. 'Difficult to set measurable targets when the relationship with Europe remains in a state of flux'

    Eluned Morgan, Minister for International Relations and the Welsh Language, responds to the report.

    All the recommendations are accepted.

    She warns that "it is difficult to set out measurable targets at a time when the relationship with Europe remains in a state of flux".

    The full response by the Welsh Government can be seen here.

    Eluned Morgan
    Image caption: Eluned Morgan
  14. 'Set out clearly the specific outcomes the Welsh Government hopes to deliver'

    Committee chair David Rees (Aberavon) presents the report, which has 10 recommendations.

    Recommendation 1 is that the "Welsh Government’s vision statement provides a clear picture of the Government’s anticipated ‘final destination’ at the end of the lifetime of the strategy. It should set out clearly the specific outcomes the Welsh Government hopes to deliver through the strategy."

    David Rees
    Image caption: David Rees
  15. Topical Question 2: UK’s mandate for the negotiations with the EU

    Huw Irranca-Davies (Ogmore) asks: To what extent was the Welsh Government consulted over the content of the UK’s mandate for the negotiations with the EU?

    Jeremy Miles replies that the "final text did not reflect any of the substantive points we made".

    Negotiations are to take place once every two or three weeks from now until the summer at least, alternating between Brussels and London - with the prime minister insisting a deal must be struck by the year's end.

    Jeremy Miles
    Image caption: Jeremy Miles
  16. Topical Question 1: Six Nations Rugby games

    Delyth Jewell (South Wales East) asks: What discussions has the Minister had in relation to the reports that Six Nations Rugby games may only be available on a pay-per-view basis in the future?

    Wales' home games are shown by BBC with the tournament shared with ITV.

    The deal ends in 2021 and reports emerged on Sunday that rights could be sold to a subscription service.

    Delyth Jewell says the Six Nations is an integral part of Welsh culture and identity and must remain on free-to-air television.

    Dafydd Elis-Thomas, Deputy Minister for Culture, Sport and Tourism, says broadcasting is not a devolved issue.

    Under the Broadcasting Act 1996, a series of "Group A" sporting events were listed which must stay on free-to-air television.

    These include the FA Cup Final, the Grand National and the Olympic Games.

    Fans at the recent Wales versus France game
    Image caption: Fans at the recent Wales versus France game
  17. Statistics about social housing waiting lists not collected by Welsh Government

    Asked by Sian Gwenllian how many people are on waiting lists for social housing throughout Wales, Julie James replies that statistics about social housing waiting lists are not collected by the Welsh Government, "however we do prioritise investment in increasing the supply of social housing".

    Sian Gwenllian
    Image caption: Sian Gwenllian
  18. Local government reorganisation?

    We move on to Questions to the Minister for Housing and Local Government, Julie James.

    The Brexit Party's David J Rowlands asks what steps is the Welsh Government taking to ensure that local government reorganisation does not result in higher costs for taxpayers.

    Julie James replies that there are no plans to "reorganise our 22 councils and when merger plans are put forward we'll act to support them".

    Julie James
    Image caption: Julie James
  19. No delay to so-called Nitrate Vulnerable Zones

    Lesley Griffiths says there will be no delay to so-called Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZ) - tougher regulations to tackle agricultural pollution.

    The regulations tightening rules on spreading and storing fertiliser and slurry will be tabled before Easter she says.

    Conservative Andrew RT Davies had suggested a delay would be sensible.

    Andrew RT Davies
    Image caption: Andrew RT Davies