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Summary

  1. The Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee takes evidence on the replacement Forth Crossing from Economy Secretary Keith Brown
  2. Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing gives evidence, after the government again asked for an extension to the deadline for making EU farming payments.
  3. Communities, social security and equalities ministers are in the hot seats during portfolio questions
  4. The Scottish government leads a debate on the next steps for education governance
  5. Labour MSP James Kelly leads a debate entitled 'Charter of Rights for People with Dementia and Carers'

Live Reporting

By Colin Bell and Craig Hutchison

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight from Holyrood Live

    Holyrood

    That brings our coverage of the Scottish Parliament on 28 June 2017 to an end.

    We'll be back tomorrow morning at 9am as The Culture, Tourism, Europe and External Relations Committee takes evidence on the Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

    We'll see you then. Have a good night.

  2. Carers will have a right to a carer's support plan to identify their needs

    Maureen Watt

    Ms Watt says she is grateful to all who have contributed to the Scottish government's third dementia strategy which aims to put the person suffering with dementia at the centre of decisions about their ongoing care.

    The mental health minister says it is not just about this strategy in isolation and improving the care of dementia sufferers is everyone's business.

    She says carers will have a right to a carer's support plan to identify their needs.

    Ms Watt says carers will be involved in dementia sufferers discharge plans and Carer's Allowance will be increased to the same level as Jobseeker's Allowance.

  3. Background: Family of Billy McNeill confirm he has dementia

    Billy McNeill was diagnosed with dementia seven years ago, his family said
    Image caption: Billy McNeill was diagnosed with dementia seven years ago, his family said

    In February we reported the family of former Celtic manager and player Billy McNeill confirmed he had dementia.

    Mr McNeill, who has been described as the club's "greatest ever captain", led the team which won the European Cup in 1967.

    His family told a Sunday newspaper he was diagnosed with the illness seven years ago and is now unable to speak.

    Celtic chief executive Peter Lawwell said Mr McNeill was facing his situation with "true bravery".

  4. Rights based approach can make a fundamental difference to dementia sufferers - minister

    Mental Health Minister Maureen Watt

    Mental Health Minister Maureen Watt says she and Irene Oldfather previously shared stories on how their mother's dementia was progressing.

    Ms Watt says it is clear that a rights based approach can make a fundamental difference to dementia sufferers and their carers.

    The mental health minister says we have come a long way since 2009 including embracing the principle of personalised dementia care.

    She says that work has been informed from listening to people with dementia, their families and staff.

  5. Background: New kit allows 'dementia experience' in Aberdeen

    Video content

    Video caption: New kit allows 'dementia experience' in Aberdeen

    A kit which allows people to experience what it is like to have dementia and other conditions has been introduced in Aberdeen.

    Workshops are being held at the the city's Royal Cornhill Hospital using specially modified goggles, gloves and other equipment to simulate symptoms.

    It is aimed at carers and those who have friends or relatives affected by such conditions.

    BBC Scotland's Fiona Stalker tried out the equipment.

  6. Tory MSP questions why post-diagnostic waiting lists are so long

    Tory MSP Peter Chapman

    Tory MSP Peter Chapman says there are an estimated 90,000 people suffering from dementia in Scotland.

    Mr Chapman questions why post-diagnostic waiting lists are so long.

    He says there are no plans coming forward to improve these waiting times.

    The Tory MSP says dementia does not discriminate and can strike at any age.

  7. Background: Virtual reality used to help design buildings for people with dementia

    Video content

    Video caption: Virtual reality used to help design buildings for people with dementia

    A Scottish architect has helped pioneer a virtual reality guide to designing buildings for people living with dementia.

    Charities say more than 90,000 people in Scotland currently have dementia.

    It's hoped that allowing architects to "virtually" attain a dementia patient's point of view will mean more sympathetic designs. Aileen Clarke reports.

  8. Glasgow aims to become a dementia friendly city

    SNP MSP Sandra White

    SNP MSP Sandra White says she knows from working with Irene Oldfather and Tommy Whitelaw that a lot of the campaigning comes from personal experience which says a lot of their integrity.

    Ms White says her own mother had dementia and it is difficult for families to know what is going on and there must be more support in this.

    The SNP MSP says she is proud of her own city, Glasgow, which aims to become a dementia friendly city.

  9. Background: Experts excited by brain 'wonder-drug'

    In April the BBC reported that scientists hoped they had found a drug to stop all neurodegenerative brain diseases, including dementia.

    In 2013, a UK Medical Research Council team stopped brain cells dying in an animal for the first time, creating headline news around the world.

    But the compound used was unsuitable for people, as it caused organ damage.

    There is no drug that slows the pace of dementia
    Image caption: There is no drug that slows the pace of dementia

    Now two drugs have been found that should have the same protective effect on the brain and are already safely used in people.

    "It's really exciting," said Prof Giovanna Mallucci, from the MRC Toxicology Unit in Leicester.

    She wants to start human clinical trials on dementia patients soon and expects to know whether the drugs work within two to three years.

    Read more here.

  10. Cuts to local authorities seriously impact dementia care

    Labour MSP Colin Smyth

    Labour MSP Colin Smyth says people with dementia simply don't have the time to wait for future policies.

    Mr Smyth says the cuts to local authorities seriously impact dementia care.

    He calls on the minister to regularly report back to parliament on the new strategy.

  11. Dementia in football: Frank Kopel's wife calls for introduction of 'Frank's Law'

    BBC Sport Scotland

    Frank Kopel and his wife Amanda during a visit to Tannadice in 2014
    Image caption: Frank Kopel and his wife Amanda during a visit to Tannadice in 2014

    Triumph and tragedy are the extremes of professional sport.

    Frank Kopel, the former Dundee United and Manchester United defender, experienced both.

    Jim McLean's first signing at Tannadice, he won two League Cups having previously been at Manchester United under Sir Matt Busby.

    His wonder strike against Anderlecht is widely regarded as one of Dundee United's finest ever goals.

    Frank's biggest battle, though, a heart-breaking and tragic one, resulted in his passing in 2014 after a fight against debilitating dementia.

    His family still strive to ensure their struggle was not in vain.

    Read more here.

  12. Tory MSP to ledge motion on Frank's Law

    Tory MSP Miles Briggs

    Tory MSP Miles Briggs says the increase of those being diagnosed with dementia is a real concern and this has increased by a third in the past six years.

    Mr Briggs announces that he will be lodging a motion on Frank's Law next week.

    He says the figure of those being diagnosed with dementia is expected to continue to rise which will be a challenge for the NHS.

  13. Background: Neurodegeneration

    Neurodegeneration

    • A neurodegenerative disease is one in which the cells of the brain and spinal cord are lost
    • The functions of these cells include decision making and control of movements
    • These cells are not easily regenerated, so the effects of diseases can be devastating
    • Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis and Huntington's

    Source: London Brain Centre

  14. Labour MSP pays tribute to Tommy Whitelaw

    Labour MSP Jackie Baillie

    Labour MSP Jackie Baillie says that Tommy Whitelaw gave up his job touring with world-famous musicians to care for his mother who passed away in 2012.

    Ms Baillie says what Mr Whitelaw did next was inspiring because he used his expertise and experience to raise awareness with his tommyontour blog.

    The Labour MSP says former MSP Mary Scanlon, who was awarded a CBE by the Queen, and Richard Baker are also in the gallery and helped set up the cross-party group with Irene Oldfather on dementia.

    Former MSPs in the gallery
    Image caption: Former MSPs in the gallery
  15. Background: Alzheimer's Scotland

    Alzheimer's Scotland
    Image caption: Alzheimer's Scotland

    From the Alzheimer's Scotland website:

    "Alzheimer Scotland provides a wide range of specialist services for people with dementia and their carers.

    "We offer personalised support services, community activities, information and advice, at every stage of the dementia journey."

  16. Dementia can affect people in their 60s, 50s and even 40s

    SNP MSP Clare Haughey

    SNP MSP Clare Haughey says she doubts that there are many people in Scotland who have not lost someone to dementia and she means lost in every sense.

    Ms Haughey says the care of someone with dementia should take into account the person's own personal circumstance.

    The SNP MSP says dementia can affect people in their 60s, 50s and even 40s, therefore more people are being seen trying to juggle work with a dementia diagnosis.

    She says employers are legally obliged to support people with dementia and the awareness should be raised amongst employers

  17. Background: Alliance's Dementia Carer Voices project

    Alliance's Dementia Carer Voices
    Image caption: Alliance's Dementia Carer Voices

    From the Alliance's Dementia Carer Voices project

    "Dementia Carer Voices is a Scottish government funded project to 2016 to engage with Health and Social Care professionals and students to promote a fuller understanding of the carer journey, provide a platform where carers can express their views and experiences of caring for a loved one with dementia and to harness the awareness raising activity undertaken by Tommy Whitelaw."

  18. Rights based approach is 'absolutely crucial'

    James Kelly

    Mr Kelly pays tribute to Tommy Whitelaw who was his late mother's carer and continues to campaign on dementia.

    The Labour MSP says a rights based approach is "absolutely crucial" because it gives those who are suffering from dementia a voice.

    He says a lot of progress has been made since the original motion in 2009 but there is still progress to be made.

  19. Background: Tommy and Joan Whitelaw

    Video content

    Video caption: Tommy Whitelaw calls for more support and respect for people living with dementia.

    Tommy Whitelaw, who was his late mother's carer, calls for more support and respect for people living with dementia.

    Mr Whitelaw says: "If we really are going to make a difference to each other we have to change the conversation from 'what's the matter with you' to 'what matters to you'".

  20. There is a growing number of people suffering from dementia in Scotland

    Labour MSP James Kelly

    Labour MSP James Kelly says there is a growing elderly population in Scotland and there is a growing number of people suffering from dementia.

    Mr Kelly says these people suddenly enter a vulnerable position in the later part of their lives.

    The Labour MSP pays tribute to former MSP Irene Oldfather for her work in the 2009 motion and says Ms Oldfather is in the gallery today.

    Mr Kelly says it is frustrating enough having an illness but particularly with dementia.