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Live Reporting

By Tom Spender and Clare Spencer

All times stated are UK

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  1. 'Deadly gas leak' at South Africa's Durban port

    Local media in the South African port city of Durban are quoting emergency services as saying a group of workers were reportedly underground when there was a gas leak:

    View more on twitter
  2. Specialists join Zimbabwe doctors strike

    Shingai Nyoka

    BBC Africa, Harare

    A group of specialist doctors have withdrawn their services from Zimbabwe’s state hospitals following a junior doctors strike over work conditions.  

    In a notice issued today, obstetricians and gynaecologists say it is no longer safe to work without the services of the striking doctors.

    The withdrawal is expected to disrupt maternal and perinatal care at three of the largest state hospitals. The specialists say they can only work once the junior doctors are available. 

    Letter
    Image caption: Registrars say it is no longer safe to continue working without doctors

    The Zimbabwe Hospital Doctors Association says close to 200 of its members are taking part in the strike.

    The striking doctors are demanding more jobs and more pay. The government says it has already offered jobs to more than 100 doctors about to complete their internships. But the second demand to increase on-call allowances from the current $300 (£240) a month has been outstanding since 2014. 

    The doctors association says state employed doctors are some of the lowest paid in southern Africa and most junior doctors are earning just under $800 a month. 

    The government has urged the doctors to return to work while negotiations continue.

  3. Maiduguri attack aftermath

    MD attack

    The BBC's Bilkisu Babangida in the north-eastern city of Maiduguri has sent in photos of the charred remains of vehicles in the Muna area.

    They attest to the ferocity of a firefight between security forces and suspected Boko Haram militants who were attempting to launch an attack.

    Two civilians and several militants are reported to have died in the clash, which saw the militants repelled.

    See earlier post for more details

    MD attack
  4. Somali 'Farmajo fan' video goes viral

    Abdullahi Yusuf Osman

    BBC Monitoring, Nairobi

    A video of an avid supporter of Somalia's recently-elected President Mohamed Abdullahi Farmajo is making waves among Somalis on Facebook and Twitter. 

    On the night of President Farmajo's election on 8 February, Abdullahi Mohamed Osman, a farmer from the town of Jowhar, was recorded chanting wildly in the streets.

    He sang out: “Ar Farmajo iigeya” - which loosely translates as “take me to Farmajo”. The people around him are seen in the video chanting back “Walaguugeyna” - which means “you will be taken to him”.

    View more on twitter

    The video began to circulate on 12 February when Osman did indeed get to meet the president.

    View more on twitter

    A number of Facebook users have since changed their user names to “Ar Farmajo iigeya" and some have created their own version of the video.

    Nairobi-based Somali rapper Digriyow has jumped on the bandwagon and released a song called 'Farmajo iigeya’  

    View more on youtube

    Somalis at home and abroad are enthusiastic about the new president. They see him as a unifier and many celebrated his victory regardless of their own clan affiliation.

    Read more: Somalia's 'Mr Cheese' president has a lot on his plate

  5. Kenyan maize boss kidnapped in Mozambique

    Jose Tembe

    BBC Africa, Maputo

    A Kenyan boss of a maize mill has been kidnapped in Matola, about 10 kilometres southwest of the Mozambican capital, Maputo. 

    The incident, according to eyewitnesses, happened yesterday morning a few meters from his work, a maize milling company. The police say the culprits are still at large. 

    Police spokesman Juarce Martins said:

    Quote Message: The kidnappers have not yet contacted either the relatives of their captive nor colleagues of the company, where he was the managing director, for a possible ransom.”

    Kidnapping, particularly for ransom, has become common in Mozambique. Before the main victims have been wealthy men of Asian origin.

  6. Tanzania 'stops 40 health centers from offering Aids services'

    HIV test

    Tanzania's government has stopped 40 privately run health centers from providing Aids-related services, accusing them of catering to homosexuals, reports AP news agency.

    Gay sex is criminalised in the country and is punishable by up to 30 years in prison. 

    The government believes that non-governmental organisations are using some health centers to promote gay sex, AP reports Health Minister Ummy Mwalimu as saying.

    The health minister also announced that the government was expanding HIV/AIDs services at 3,000 other health centers across the country, AP adds.   

    AP goes on to say in September, the government temporarily suspended HIV/AIDS outreach projects targeting gay men.

  7. Dineo heads to South Africa

    Milton Nkosi

    BBC Africa, Johannesburg

    forecast
    Image caption: Dineo has been making its way over northeastern South Africa

    Cylone Dineo has been downgraded in strength but floods continue to threaten villages and towns.

    Dineo has already claimed seven lives and damaged about 20,000 homes and has displaced at least 130,000 people in Mozambique.

    Here in Johannesburg we woke up with low cloud and light rain blanketing the city.

    Vast areas in Limpopo, KwaZulu Natal and Mpumalanga provinces are expected to experience heavy rain and strong winds this weekend.

    The weather service here has issued warnings saying they are “posing a great risk”.

    The head of South Africa’s Disaster Management Centre Mmaphaka Tau said “In the country we are having rainfall in various areas but it is just rain without major storms. We will still urge our communities to remain alert because localised flooding can be determined by a number of factors.”

    View more on twitter
  8. First female governor appointed in Egypt

    View more on twitter

    For the first time in Egypt's history a woman has been appointed as a provincial governor. 

    Nadia Ahmed Abdou has been sworn into office in the Governorate of Beheira, in the Nile Delta. 

    She's an engineer with a long record of public service and her foerce decision-making powers have seen her earn the nickname "iron woman".

    The news site Egyptian Streets reports that she has served as the deputy governor since 2013. She spent 10 years, from 2002 to 2012, as chief of the Alexandria Drinking Water Company. She was also the first woman to hold this post. 

  9. Two dead as militants repelled from Maiduguri

    map

    Nine suspected Boko Haram militants are reported to have been killed in an overnight attack on the Nigerian city of Maiduguri, the most serious such assault for months. 

    Three female suicide bombers blew themselves up on the outskirts, killing two civilians. 

    Witnesses say troops fired at gunmen escorting other suicide bombers, killing at least six. In a battle lasting more than an hour, the security forces prevented the militants from entering the city.

    Nigeria's Sun newspaper quoted local sources who said the militants tried to invade the newly constructed Customs House where internally displaced people are being housed.

  10. Battle of the Pogbas: Paul 3-0 Florentin

    Florentin Pogba (left) sported brother Paul's number six on the side of his head
    Image caption: Florentin Pogba (left) sported brother Paul's number six on the side of his head

    The world's most expensive player, Paul Pogba, was up against his brother Florentin, as Manchester United played St Etienne in the Europa League on Thursday evening.

    Florentin - a Guinea international - was signed by the French side for 500,000 euros in 2012.

    Mother Yeo and third brother Mathias watched from the stands as the two shared a warm embrace before kick-off, with the elder sibling Florentin sporting a number 19 on one side of his head and his brother's six on the other.

    "It is something very magical, it does not happen every day and I really enjoyed playing against my brother," said the United player.

    France international Paul controlled the tempo of the match in a dominant display.

    However, on one occasion he inadvertently gave the ball away to Florentin, whose burst forward eventually saw the ball reach Senegalese midfielder Saivet, but he could not find the target.

    Florentin's rising drive in the first half almost saw him nick an away goal for his side, while Paul wasted good chances in the second period, the best of which came as he headed against the woodwork when unmarked.

    However the Saint-Etienne defender's evening ended early as he hobbled off with an injury with 12 minutes remaining.

    The brothers will clash again in the return leg.

    Read the full match report here

  11. Cyclone Dineo 'kills 7 in Mozambique'

    Cyclone Dineo killed seven people and affected 130,000 across southern Mozambique, AFP news agency quotes Mozambique's natural disaster agency as saying.

    They added that more than 20,000 homes were destroyed by winds and very strong rain and the search for survivors is ongoing.

    Dineo's impact was greatest in Inhambane, an area popular with tourists on Mozambique's south east coast, as this Mozambican Human Rights Watch researcher tweets:

    View more on twitter

    It was struck by winds of more than 100 kmh (62 mph), torrential rain and rough seas. 

    Dineo was downgraded to a tropical depression on Thursday and renamed "ex-Dineo". 

    However, a BBC Weather forecast warns that heavy rain across Southern Africa could lead to flooding.

  12. Hundreds of migrants 'enter Spanish enclave from Morocco'

    Hundreds of migrants smashed their way into Spain's North African territory of Ceuta from Morocco early this morning and some were injured doing so, the emergency services and police told AFP news agency.

    The Civil Guard estimated 500 people could have succeeded in entering the town, the emergency services said on Twitter. 

    They added many of them were hurt along with members of the security forces. 

    Back in December around 400 migrants  were photographed storming a border fence to enter Ceuta from Morocco - that was the most in a decade.

    People storming Ceuta border fence in December 2016
    Image caption: Hundreds of migrants also stormed the Ceuta border fence in December

    The tiny Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla sit on the northern shores of Morocco's Mediterranean coast. Together they form the European Union's only land borders with Africa.        

  13. Kenya in mobile snooping plan

    Wanyama wa Chebusiri

    BBC Africa

    kenyans on phones
    Image caption: Kenya's government wants to collect citizens' call data

    Kenyan authorities have launched an attempt to compel mobile phone companies in the country to allow government agents to tap people’s communication data. 

    The government industry regulator, Communications Authority of Kenya (CAK), has written to mobile service providers requesting to be able to monitor their networks, effectively opening up private communication data on phone calls, text messages and financial transactions to an entity other than those already licensed to hold the information. 

    The proposed move would see more than 30 million mobile phone owners in Kenya lose their privacy and confidentiality. 

    The main mobile phone companies are Safaricom, Airtel and Orange. 

    CAK officials say the plan, which is aimed at tracking counterfeit devices, is expected to be implemented as soon as next week.  

    However there has been sharp criticism of the plan in local media.

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  14. Today's wise words

    Our African proverb of the day:   

    Quote Message: A long wait may harm the stomach. from A Swahili proverb sent by Edwin Sosthenes, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
    A Swahili proverb sent by Edwin Sosthenes, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Click here to send us your proverbs

  15. Good morning

    Welcome to BBC Africa Live where we will bring you the latest news from around the continent.