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Summary

  1. Zimbabwe's new $46m parliament is to be built on farmland
  2. 'Millions missing' from Uganda refugee funds
  3. Mass rape reported in north of South Sudan
  4. Zuma wants corruption trial thrown out
  5. Two-thirds of children in CAR 'need help urgently'
  6. 'Cattle thieves' killed by Nigerian police after raid
  7. Goodluck Jonathan cites Obama's role in 2015 elections

Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

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  1. Scroll down for Friday's stories

    We'll be back next week

    That's all from BBC Africa Live for this week. Keep up-to-date with what's happening across the continent by listening to the Africa Today podcast or check the BBC News website.

    A reminder of our wise words of the day:

    Quote Message: When good fortune knocks, you have to open the door yourself." from A Swahili proverb sent by Diana Rosser, London, UK
    A Swahili proverb sent by Diana Rosser, London, UK

    Click here to send us your African proverbs.

    And we leave you with this photo of two curious children peeping through a window with toy binoculars in Ghana. It's one of our favourite photos of the past week:

    Two curious children peep through a window with toy binoculars in Ghana.
  2. Africa's ancient art starts the journey home

    African states are accepting France's offer to send back artworks in its museums.

    The BBC's Pierre-Antoine Denis tells Caroline Wyatt what French museums think of it:

    Video content

    Video caption: African states are accepting France's offer to send back artworks in its museums
  3. Uganda refugee audit finds million-dollar corruption

    A displaced man with a child
    Image caption: Uganda is said to host some 1.4 million refugees

    A UN investigation into its refugee programme in Uganda has uncovered misconduct and corruption.

    The audit found that millions of dollars were misspent awarding major contracts improperly and overpaying for goods and services.

    Speaking to the BBC, UNHCR Uganda Country Director Joel Boutroue denied that any money was overpaid:

    Quote Message: Our headquarters with other lawyers are in the thick of unravelling all the 20,000-plus invoice related [to this].
    Quote Message: We have not overpaid. What we are renegotiating for the moment with the former contractors is how much more we should pay. We have not overpaid money at present.
    Quote Message: What is true is that there was poor oversight of these contacts."

    Until recently, Uganda has been lauded for its immigration policies and described as one of the best places in the world to be a refugee.

    Uganda is said to host some 1.4 million refugees - welcoming more than any other country in 2016 - mostly from South Sudan and DR Congo.

    In February, four Ugandan government officials were suspended amid allegations they had inflated refugee figures.

  4. Zuma wants corruption trial thrown out

    Milton Nkosi

    BBC Africa, Johannesburg

    Jacob Zuma
    Image caption: The arms deal, among other scandals, dogged Jacob Zuma's presidency

    Lawyers for South Africa's former President Jacob Zuma have called for criminal charges against him to be dropped.

    He appeared in court today, and his trial was adjourned until 20 May next year in a move that was agreed on by both the defence and prosecution.

    Mr Zuma is facing 16 charges for corruption, money laundering and racketeering emanating from a 1999 arms deal.

    Both Mr Zuma and French arms company, Thales, have applied for the court to quash the whole trial and will argue for a permanent stay from prosecution when the trial resumes.

    For its part, Thales cites an unfair trial in its application.

    Meanwhile, the 76-year-old former president cited political interference by the National Prosecuting Authority and what he called "blatant prosecutorial bias" among others as reasons for the case to be dropped.

    Read more:

  5. The Resident Presidents talk Brexit

    Our satirical presidents, Olushambles and Kibarkingmad, have a few choice words for British Prime Minister Theresa May.

    Here's their take on all things Brexit:

    Video content

    Video caption: Olushambles has some advice for the British Prime Minister
  6. 'Cattle thieves' killed by Nigerian police

    Ishaq Khalid

    BBC Africa, Abuja

    Cattle

    Nigerian police say they have killed 104 gunmen in the north-western state of Zamfara, near the village of Birnin-Magaji.

    Authorities say the incident followed an ambush on a police patrol convoy in a remote area where armed cattle thieves frequently attack villages, carrying out mass killings and abductions as well as stealing livestock.

    Hundreds of cattle and sheep were recovered from the gunmen, several of whose camps were destroyed.

    Police say one officer was killed in the violence, but some reports suggest the force suffered multiple casualties.

    Clashes between farmers and nomadic herders are common in several states in Nigeria. It is a key security challenge that Nigeria's government is under pressure to resolve ahead of general elections in February.

    To that end, government troops, the Nigerian air force and the police have all been deployed recently.

  7. Jailed for their husbands' crimes

    Women in Madagascar say they are being jailed for crimes their male relatives are accused of.

    BBC 100 Women has had access to Madagascan prisons to speak to women who have been detained for months – and sometimes years – told they were "accomplices" or should have known what their husbands, brothers or sons were doing.

    Video content

    Video caption: Women in Madagascar are being imprisoned for crimes their male relatives are accused of.
  8. 'Mass rape in South Sudan'

    Medical NGO releases shocking report

    Protesters in South Sudan, pictured in 2017.
    Image caption: Local rights groups have long spoken out about the suffering inflicted on women and children

    Medical charity Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) says there has been a wave of "horrific episodes of sexual violence" against women and girls over the past 10 days in northern South Sudan.

    MSF has given "emergency medical and psycho-social support to 125 women and girls who were raped, robbed and beaten in Rubkona County", it said in a statement.

    That's compared to the 104 sexual and gender-based violence survivors who used MSF's services in the first 10 months of this year.

    Some of the survivors are younger than 10 years old while others are over 65, it added.

    Their attackers reportedly robbed them of anything of value they had - including money, clothes and shoes - and destroyed their ration cards, preventing them from receiving food distributions.

    MSF says the rise in attacks on women coincides with a rise in the number of displaced people seeking food aid distributions in the region.

    They say women have taken to walking together in large groups for safety, but they are frequently targeted by groups of attackers.

    A fragile ceasefire is currently in place in the country, after a power-sharing deal between the warring sides was signed in September.

    Years of civil conflict have forced 3.8 million people from their homes according to the World Food Programme, while the UN has identified 40 officials who it says may be individually responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity.

  9. Should African football's gender pay gap exist?

    The Women's Africa Cup of Nations final is on Saturday but should the winners get the same prize money as their male counterparts?

    The winning team currently receives significantly less financial reward for winning the tournament than not just the senior men's teams but also the male Under-20 and Under-17 sides.

    Sport Africa's Janine Anthony has been taking a closer look during this year's tournament in Ghana.

    Video content

    Video caption: Should African football's gender pay gap exist?
  10. Cameroon separatists 'blow up' military vehicle

    Peter Tah

    Cameroon

    Separatist fighters planted IED to stall Cameroon army's operation in the Anglophone region
    Image caption: Separatist fighters planted IED to stall Cameroon army's operation in the Anglophone region

    The Cameroonian army has released pictures of an attack on a military convoy in the Kembong village in the restive South-West region on Thursday.

    Activists pushing for an independent state for the country’s English-speaking South-West and North-West regions said separatists fighters were behind the attack.

    The fighters said they planted an improvised explosive device (IED) in an uneven road - that its fighters had dug - to stall security forces' advances in the area.

    The army has, however, not yet issued an official statement on the attack where no soldier was reportedly killed but it's unclear if there were injuries.

    I tried to contact the army for a reaction but there was no response.

    Kembong is one of the worst affected areas by the ongoing fighting between the army and Anglophone separatist fighters, who want to create an independent state called Ambazonia.

    If anything, the successful use of an IED points to the escalation of the Anglophone crisis.

    The country's English-speaking regions have been hit by more than a year of deadly violence. Residents say the francophone majority discriminate against them in court and schools.

    Separatist fighters planted IED to stall Cameroon army's operation in the Anglophone region

    Thursday's attack comes barely a month after President Paul Biya called on the secessionist movement to lay down their arms and "get back to the right track".

  11. Satellites warn African farmers of pest infestations

    "Plant doctors" can now give local farmers that pest infestations are on their way so they can take precautions
    Image caption: "Plant doctors" can now give local farmers that pest infestations are on their way so they can take precautions

    UK researchers have developed an early warning system to prevent the crops of African farmers from being devastated.

    The Pest Risk Information Service (Prise) combines temperature data and weather forecasts with computer models.

    It then sends farmers a mobile phone alert so that they can take precautions.

    It is hoped that the system will boost yields and increase farm incomes by up to 20%.

    Prise is being used in Kenya, Ghana and Zambia and will be rolled out soon in other parts of the world.

    Prise is an upgrade of a highly successful UK Aid scheme run by the Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International development charity (CABI).

    It uses a network of so-called "plant doctors" and clinics to advise farmers when pests or diseases destroy their crops.

    Farmers and plant doctors have access to an app to help them diagnose pest infestations and suggest remedies

    The "doctors" draw on a database using an app to help them diagnose the issue and then prescribe the right pesticide and other measures. Walter Wafula, who grows maize in Bungoma in Kenya, told BBC News that the service had transformed his family's life.

    Read the full story on the BBC website.

  12. Caf reveals preliminary shortlists for 2018 Player of the Year awards

    Egypt's Mohamed Salah won Caf's men's Player of the Year award for 2017
    Image caption: Egypt's Mohamed Salah won Caf's men's Player of the Year award for 2017

    The Confederation of African Football (Caf) has revealed its preliminary lists of nominees for the 2018 African men's and women's Player of the Year awards.

    Thirty-four names have been revealed for the men's category, with eight of the nominees playing in the English Premier League.

    Last year's winner, Egypt forward Mohamed Salah,is joined on the list by his two Liverpool team-mates Sadio Mane of Senegal and Guinea international Naby Keita.

    Twelve men on the list play their football in Africa, including Youcef Belaili, Taha Khenissi and Anis Badri - who all play for the 2018 African Champions League winners Esperance in Tunisia.

    Caf previously had an Africa-based Player of the Year category which has now stopped.

    Read more on the BBC Sport Africa website.

  13. Naka Drotske: South Africa World Cup winner shot during robbery in Pretoria

    Naka Drotske coached Super Rugby side the Cheetahs
    Image caption: Naka Drotske coached Super Rugby side the Cheetahs

    The former South African rugby player Naka Drotske is in hospital after being shot during a burglary outside the capital Pretoria.

    Drotske - a member of the 1995 World Cup winning team - was with another former Springbok player, Os du Randt, when at least three men burst in on them on Thursday evening.

    Drotske was shot three times in the ensuing scuffle, while Du Randt remained unharmed.

    A police spokesman said 47-year-old Drotske was in a serious but stable condition.

    Drotske won 26 caps for South Africa between 1993 and 1999 and also played for London Irish from 2001-2003.

    After retiring from playing he coached Super Rugby side the Cheetahs, before quitting rugby in 2015 to pursue business interests.

  14. Botswana academic to taxi driver

    He used to work as a lecturer in computing at the university, but now Roland Kgosimore makes "peanuts" by driving taxis in Gaborone.

    So why is it so hard to make a living in Botswana?

    The BBC's Alan Kasujja went along for a drive with him.

    Video content

    Video caption: "Everyone is running up and down just to try to make a living"
  15. Zimbabwe to get new parliament building

    Zimbabwe's President Emmerson Mnangagwa is expected to break ground for the building of a new parliament, the information ministry has tweeted.

    The building which is to be located on farmland north-west of the capital, Harare, will have a total floor area of 33,000 square metres.

    When completed it will replace the current parliament building, built in the colonial era, which the government has said is too small to house its more than 200 lawmakers.

    The project will cost $46m (£36m), news site Quartz reported in 2016.

    An artist's impression of the building, which is being funded by China, has been shared by the information ministry:

    View more on twitter
  16. Two-thirds of children in CAR 'need help urgently'

    A soldier of Tanzanian contingent from the UN peacekeeping mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA)
    Image caption: The UN has a peacekeeping force in the CAR

    The UN's children's agency Unicef says two-thirds of the children in the Central African Republic - 1.5 million in all - need humanitarian aid and the crisis is getting worse.

    In a report, Unicef says one in four children in the CAR is displaced and thousands have been subjected to sexual violence, yet this year the organisation has received less than half the funds it needs to help them.

    After years of sectarian conflict, armed groups control much of the CAR. Attacks on aid workers have quadrupled since 2017.

    Read more:Singing for peace in the Central African Republic

  17. Nigeria ex-leader: 'Obama meddled in our election'

    Chris Ewokor

    BBC Africa, Abuja

    Former US President Barack Obama meddled in Nigeria's 2015 election, former Nigerian President, Goodluck Jonathan, has told the BBC.

    He repeated the claim made in his recently released book, My Transition Hours.

    "The level of interference by the Obama's government was very overwhelming," adding that it went "outside the normal diplomatic relationship," Mr Jonathan said.

    He cited the #BringBackOurGirls - a social media campaign launched to highlight the plight of 276 schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram militants in 2014 - and backed by Mr Obama's wife, Michelle, as having cast his government in a bad light:

    Quote Message: Immediately the Chibok issue came up, we expected Nigerians to be concerned. How do we get these girls out? Within a couple of days, we saw people going to the US with Bring Back Our Girls Placards... How? Why?... and of course Mrs Obama received all of those placards."

    He said the US State Department poured "vitriol on our administration" and presented his government "as a problem of Nigeria, far beyond the Chibok situation".

    Quote Message: The level of interference by the Obama's government was very overwhelming. It's not as if I couldn't have won the elections even with that, but if, by my own thinking, and also the way some other people looked at it, they go outside the normal diplomatic relationship, then it should be mentioned."

    Mr Jonathan also said he was worried about the "neutrality of the relevant agencies of government" who have a role in next year's election, but said he hoped they would do their job.

    Watch the interview below:

    Video content

    Video caption: Nigeria ex-President Goodluck Jonathan on 'Obama interference' in 2015 election bid
  18. Friday's wise words

    Our proverb of the day:

    Quote Message: When good fortune knocks, you have to open the door yourself." from A Swahili proverb sent by Diana Rosser, London, UK
    A Swahili proverb sent by Diana Rosser, London, UK

    Click here to send us your African proverbs.

  19. Good morning

    Welcome back to BBC Africa Live where we will bring you the latest news and trends from around the continent.

  20. Scroll down for Thursday's stories

    We'll be back on Friday

    BBC Africa Live

    Farouk Chothia

    That's all from BBC Africa Live for now. Keep up-to-date with what's happening across the continent by listening to the Africa Today podcast or check the BBC News website.

    A reminder of our wise words of the day:

    Quote Message: Even a winding path won't force you to sleep in the bush." from A Setswana proverb sent by John Walters in Tsienyane, Botswana.
    A Setswana proverb sent by John Walters in Tsienyane, Botswana.

    Click here to send us your African proverbs.

    And we leave you with a view of the sun setting at the Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe:

    View more on instagram