Tesla recalls cars that may roll past stop signs

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A 4-way stop signImage source, Getty Images

Tesla is recalling nearly 54,000 vehicles because a software feature lets them roll through stop signs.

The company will issue an over-the-air software update that disables the Full Self-Driving Beta (FSDB) "rolling stop" function.

Elon Musk, the firm's chief executive tweeted that there were no safety issues and the cars just slowed down.

All-way stop signs, common on North American roads, require drivers to halt completely, before proceeding.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA): "Failing to stop at a stop sign can increase the risk of a crash."

In recall documents, the electric vehicle maker notes that if certain conditions are met, the "rolling stop" feature is designed to allow the vehicle to travel through all-way-stop intersections at up to 5.6mph without coming to a complete stop.

Tesla says the conditions include:

  • the functionality must be enabled in FSDB settings.
  • the vehicle must be travelling below 5.6mph
  • no relevant moving cars, pedestrians or cyclists are detected near the intersection
  • all roads entering the intersection have a speed limit of 30 mph

In January, Tesla met with NHTSA to discuss the rolling-stop feature, and shortly afterwards decided on a voluntary recall.

It covers some 2016-2022 Model S and Model X, 2017-2022 Model 3, and 2020-2022 Model Y vehicles.

'No issues'

Tesla says it is not aware of any collisions, injuries or fatalities related to the feature.

Mr Musk tweeted: "There were no safety issues. The car simply slowed to -2mph and continued forward if clear view with no cars or pedestrians."

The news follows the announcement in December of a recall of 475,000 Tesla vehicles in the US for potential issues involving rear-view cameras and the boot.

And in August the NHTSA opened an official investigation into Tesla's "self-driving" Autopilot system.

The safety administration said it was acting, following 11 Tesla crashes since 2018 involving emergency vehicles.