Conservation

The fishing technique "killing three ecosystems in one go"

The devastating impact of fish fences are just being understood
Fish fences are very large fishing nets which are commonly used in tropical seas. However, they are causing extensive social, ecological and economic damage and threatening marine biodiversity according to a new study. 

Dan Exton works with Operation Wallacea - an organisation that runs a conservation research programmes in remote locations around the world. He told Newsday's Karnie Sharp about their research.

(Photo: A fish-eye view of a fish fence. Credit: Benjamin Jones)
RSPB ask for photographs of puffins feeding to help work out why bird numbers are falling.
RSPB asks for photographs of puffins feeding to help work out why bird numbers are falling.

Why the declining number of vultures might affect epidemics

A conservationist explains why vultures are 'the sanitary workers of the bird world'
What images comes to your mind when you think about vultures? Ugly birds feasting on a carcasses in the wild perhaps? Conservationists on the other hand see them differently. They say that a healthy population of vultures can protect the African continent from epidemics. The problem is that many of the species are close to extinction. Newsday's Karnie Sharp spoke to Dr Muhtari Aminu Kano, a conservationist in Nigeria. 

(Photo: White-backed vulture in Serengeti National Park in Tanzania Credit: Godong/UIG via Getty Images)