Ocado

Ticker OCDO

Today's data summary

Market closed
% change
+4.73%
Price Pence
1194.50
Change
+54.00
As of 21:47 20 Jul 2019
Market cap. Pound sterling
8,337.18 million
As of 21:47 20 Jul 2019

Latest updates

Mixed trading on the FTSE

The FTSE 100 has tipped lower in afternoon trade, down at 7,522.88.

There was little movement at the top of the blue chip risers and fallers. Online grocery group Ocado's share price is down 4% at £11.66.

Shares in Barratt Developments are ahead 3.73% at 605.8p.

The FTSE 250 is still ahead but has trimmed gains to 0.18% at 19,454.35.

Barratt Developments top FTSE 100

Barratt Developments
Barratt Developments

Barratt Developments is the FTSE 100's biggest riser this morning after the housebuilder said full-year profits will beat forecasts.

The company said it has reduced the height of its houses to help cut costs and is reducing its exposure to the London market.

It share price is ahead 3.73% at 605.9p. Reckitt Benckiser is also ahead, up 2.75% at £66.03 following its US settlement over claims linked to its former company Indivior.

Ocado, on the other hand, dropped 2.47% to £11.84.

The FTSE 100 is up 0.24% at 7,548.78.

Ocado: We can't prepare for no-deal

Today Programme

BBC Radio 4

Ocado delivery person
Newscast

Ocado might have tech fixes for a lot of challenges in the grocery distribution business but a no-deal Brexit might prove a challenge too far.

Chief executive Tim Steiner says it isn't possible to prepare properly for even just a brief standstill at the border.

"You can’t take any precautions really," he told Radio 4's Today Programme.

"We run our business on around a week of inventory in total. So to buy a week of inventory we would have to double the size of our facilities and our facilities are full so we’d have to buy replica facilities for that one week. It's just not possible."

Ocado: Waitrose treated us like the junior

Today Programme

BBC Radio 4

Ocado van
AFP

If you bought Ocado shares two years ago when they were less than £3, you're laughing now they're up at £12.

Behind this is the metamorphosis from grocery distributor to software company. These days they're filing patents in areas from vertical farming to carparking and have signed a new deal with Marks and Spencer.

Chief executive Tim Steiner told BBC Radio 4's Today Programme they ditched their longstanding relationship with Waitrose because they wanted to be treated as an equal.

"We had a useful relationship with Waitrose for 19 years. But they treated us like the junior in the relationship and they didn't want our feedback. They didn't want our customers' feedback. They didn’t want to innovate or develop products specifically for our customers' tastes.

"The new relationship with M&S is different because they're a shareholder, because its their only foray online with food. They’re completely committed to it in a way that Waitrose weren’t"

Corporate-speak masterclass from Ocado

In its half-year report today Ocado published the following statement, an absolute masterclass of corporate-speak below (try saying it all in one breath!).

What are your favourite examples of corporate-speak? Do send them in to bizlivepage@bbc.co.uk

Over the last six months, the centre of gravity at Ocado Group has shifted from our heritage as an iconic and much-loved domestic pure-play online grocer to our future as a technology-driven global software and robotics platform business, providing a unique and proprietary end-to-end solution for online grocery, and an innovation factory, applying our technology expertise to adjacent markets and other verticals.

Ocado: 'No fire sale'

Ocado van
AFP

According to Neil Wilson, chief market analyst for Markets.com, despite taking a £100m hit and reporting a £43m pre-tax loss, Ocado has largely shrugged off the fire at its Andover warehouse to deliver a healthy bump in retail revenues.

Mr Wilson believes international partnerships will play a big role in bringing Ocado back into profitability, as the revenue stream, although small now, is expected to grow sharply.

"Bottom line – big hit from the Andover fire on group earnings this year but this is already baked into the share price and the fees from international deals are starting to come through.

"These will ratchet up significantly in the coming years. M&S deal provides necessary cash for investment whilst deleveraging the business from the UK retail market."

Ocado earnings slump 46% after fire

Ocado fire
HRFS

Ocado reported a 46% fall in first-half earnings, reflecting the loss of capacity after that February fire.

The company made adjusted earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) of £18.7m in the 26 weeks to 2 June compared to £34.8m in the same period last year.

Ocado is confident about its outlook. "We have never had as many opportunities to grow as we do today," it said.

Ocado fire cost £110.3m

Ocado fire warehouse
Reuters

The fire which destroyed Ocado's Andover warehouse in February cost the firm £110.3m.

The total was offset by £11.8m of insurance proceeds to bring the net cost to date down to £98.5m, the company said in its half-year report.

The company said the fire impacted 2% of sales in its first half year but retail revenue growth was still 9.7%.

Turning to its technology partnerships, fees invoiced from Solutions partners were £122.7m, up 36%, with fees from international partners almost doubling.