FGM

  1. How crowdmapping is preventing FGM in Tanzania

    Video content

    Video caption: Thousands of girls in rural communities have escaped FGM thanks to crowdsourced mapping

    Thousands of girls in rural communities in Tanzania have escaped FGM thanks to crowdsourced mapping

  2. Video content

    Video caption: Sudan banned FGM - what happens next?

    FGM was outlawed by Sudan's new Sovereign Council, who have been in power since August 2019.

  3. Officers trained to help forced marriage victims

    Rebecca Curley

    Local Democracy Reporter

    Police officers are being trained to help victims of forced marriage, female genital mutilation (FGM) and honour-based abuse crimes.

    Surrey Police and Crime Commissioner David Munro said although the number of honour-based crimes is not high in Surrey he welcomed the move to crackdown on “harmful traditional practices”.

    Forty officers have been trained to guide and advise officers and staff when investigating crimes such as forced marriage and FGM, and more will be trained in April 2020, Surrey Police said.

  4. Video content

    Video caption: FGM victim urges others to seek help as new clinics open in England

    Patricia Mansaray says clinics opening across England will help victims of FGM speak out and explain what they are going through physically and mentally.

  5. FGM victim urges others to seek help

    Video content

    Video caption: FGM victim urges others to seek help as new clinics open in England

    Patricia Mansaray says clinics opening across England will help victims of FGM speak out and explain what they are going through physically and mentally.

  6. Croydon appoints first FGM support worker

    Local Democracy Reporting Service

    Croydon has appointed its first specialist social worker to help tackle Female Genital Mutilation and support those affected.

    It is thought about 3,000 women in the borough have been affected by the procedure whereby a women or girl's genitals have been deliberately cut, injured or changed without medical reason.

    In the UK it is illegal and carries a 14 year prison sentence for carrying it out or helping it take place.

    In the past two years Croydon's Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) received 122 referrals where FGM was the greatest concern.

    A study by City University in 2015 estimated that from 2005 to 2013 there were 827 girls born to women with FGM in Croydon and in 2011 there were 136 girls between the ages of 0-14 years with FGM living in Croydon.

    FGM graphic

    Councillor David Wood said: "I am pleased our FGM specialist will be embedding themselves into the local community where they will be best placed to build trust and offer help to those affected and at risk of this procedure, as well as assisting colleagues in health, the police, education, social care and other frontline services."

    The new post will be based in Croydon's Early Help team and will also support other social workers in responding appropriately to cases.

    It is jointly funded by the council and the National FGM Centre - a joint partnership between Barnardo's and the Local Government Association.

    The social worker will also develop preventative work for cases involving breast flattening where a pubescent girls' breasts are ironed, pounded or massaged to make the breasts disappear or delay their development.

  7. #GreaterLondoner: Hibo Wardere, 50

    BBC London

    Hibo Wardere

    I was butchered.

    I was six when I was mutilated in Somalia.

    You are held down by the people that you love and trust.

    There was no medication. There was no anaesthetic.

    They pulled my legs apart and chopped my labias off.

    Whatever skin you have left, they stitch it up.

    The pain was overwhelming. I felt death was better.

    Physically, you might heal, but emotionally it’s for life.

    I moved to the UK when I was 18 and it crept back up on me.

    I felt like the whole world was closing in on me. My pain, my despair.

    After a lot of therapy I accepted what had happened.

    Now I can look at myself and be at peace.

    I realised I can use the pain as a tool to fight back.

    I’ve accepted that I am not a freak of nature. I am not an incomplete human being.

    My femininity wasn’t taken away.

    This was part of my culture, my mum didn’t do it out of hatred.

    She was doing it out of protection, which took me years to understand.

    I’ve written a book and now I’m campaigning against female genital mutilation.

    My daughters give me the motivation to fight on.

    Hibo Wardere, 50, Waltham Forest

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  8. Ethiopia vows to root out child marriage and female genital mutilation

    Video content

    Video caption: The age-old practices destroy the life of millions of girls.

    The age-old practices destroy the life of millions of girls.

  9. Video content

    Video caption: FGM ‘no longer just an African problem’

    Former first lady of Somaliland Edna Adan Ismail looks at female genital mutilation among women in the UK.