Leicester City Council

Labour's Peter Soulsby was elected mayor after winning 61% of first preference votes. More on that election

Election results for 2019

    Elected in 2019
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    53
    53
    +1
    Elected in 2019
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    1
    1
    No results
    Elected in 2019
    Total
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    0
    0
    -1

Most Recent

  1. Leicester mayor welcomes end to 'daft' rule

    Amy Orton

    Local Democracy Reporter

    Leicester's mayor has said he will be "glad" to see "one of the daftest" lockdown rules imposed on the city lifted.

    The city already has the same restrictions as "tier two" measures announced by the government today, but people can now meet in gardens subject to the "rule of six".

    Sir Peter Soulsby told the Local Democracy Reporting Service: "The garden rule was one of the daftest things about the Leicester situation, so I'll be glad to see that lifted."

    He welcomed the new rules as clearer, but added it is unclear what puts an area in or out of a certain tier or alert level.

    Sir Peter Soulsby
  2. Marshals and closed roads to deal with school run

    David Pittam

    BBC News Online

    Marshals will be on hand at Leicester schools to take care of any potential crowding problems this morning as pupils return to classrooms.

    Leicester City Council said it has also stencilled social distancing reminders on pavements and will temporarily close roads outside some schools to encourage people to walk or cycle.

    Busy bus routes will also have extra vehicles to prevent overcrowding.

    School sign
    Quote Message: Returning to the routine of school life after such a long time away is quite a significant milestone for many families, and we want to ensure they get all the help they need to feel confident and safe in doing so." from Elly Cutkelvin Leicester city councillor
    Elly CutkelvinLeicester city councillor
  3. Coronavirus: Face coverings to be delivered to shielders

    Liam Barnes

    BBC News

    Face coverings will be delivered to people in Leicester who have been shielding during the coronavirus pandemic.

    Leicester City Council said it is sending two washable coverings to all 15,000 in the city classed as "clinically extremely vulnerable" to help them for when lockdown measures are relaxed.

    It comes ahead of the government's latest review of the lockdown conditions in Leicester, which is expected to be made on Friday.

    The coverings have been made by firms in the city and will feature the slogan #LeicesterTogether, with the estimated cost of £120,000 to make them provided by a grant given to battle coronavirus.

    Vulnerable people who were advised to shield themselves in March are still encouraged to do so until at least 17 August.

    Leicester face masks
    Quote Message: By providing everyone who's been shielding with two simple washable face coverings, we hope we'll help them get ready to take those first careful steps back into our city and its neighbourhoods, when the government guidance changes." from Sir Peter Soulsby Mayor of Leicester
    Sir Peter SoulsbyMayor of Leicester
  4. Housing wait for mum who carries disabled child up stairs

    Amy Orton

    Local Democracy Reporter

    A cancer nurse who has to carry her disabled daughter up four flights of stairs to the bathroom has not been added to a council’s housing register, despite applying six months ago.

    Janine Powell, from Beaumont Leys, Leicester, wants to move to a home with a ground floor bathroom to care for her nearly two-year-old daughter Amandla more easily.

    The mother-of-five said she is trying to get added to the register before it "becomes too much" as "it's getting harder and harder".

    "I've still not had my application processed. I've complained and still got nowhere," she said.

    Amandla has mobility issues and global development delays after she suffered a cardiac arrest as a baby and her brain was starved of oxygen.

    Ms Powell and Amandla sleep in the living room of the three-bedroom house which they adapted due to the long wait for four-bedroom properties.

    Council policy means that Amandla cannot be assessed by a council-appointed occupational therapist until she is three years old.

    Ms Powell has however arranged for an NHS assessment which states the family should be rehoused. The report has been forwarded to Leicester City Council for consideration.

    A city council spokesperson said: "Last year we had only 40 four-bedroom properties become available to let, and we currently have around 500 families on our housing register who are waiting for one.

    "We can confirm we've received the occupational health information recently provided by Ms Powell and are in the process of assessing her application."

  5. Man finds parents' ashes at garden removed decades ago

    Amy Orton

    Local Democracy Reporter

    A man who visited a remembrance garden for more than 40 years thinking his parents' ashes were there has discovered the soil and plants were replaced more than three decades ago.

    The man told the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman (LGO) he visited the remembrance garden, in a Leicester City Council cemetery, annually.

    In 2018, the man – named in an LGO report as Mr X – discovered the soil and plants were removed from the plot in 1986. His parents' ashes had been scattered there in 1976.

    When he complained to the city council, he was told "the scattering of ashes over time reduces the capacity of the soil to support plants" so it had to be replaced.

    Leicester City Council's City Hall

    The LGO's investigator said: "The council would not have been able to notify all relatives of its change of plants and soil in the gardens as many parties would be involved."

    The report concluded: "There is no requirement for a local authority to preserve scattered ashes on a site forever."

    A council spokesman said: "Depending on the location, scattered ashes are likely to completely break down within a few months. Ashes scattered on memorial gardens would also be exposed to normal horticultural practices such as digging and weeding which would further accelerate this breakdown of the ashes."