Cycling

  1. Cycle plans under the microscope in York

    BBC Radio York

    City of York Council's deputy leader has defended delays to improving the area's walking and cycling network after being accused of "failing to get their act together" over the plans.

    Cycle lane

    The £3.3m Active Travel Programme is planned for the next two years.

    It includes a segregated cycle route on part of York's outer ring road and an off-road cycle route between Wheldrake and Heslington.

    Councillor Andy D'Agorne, who is responsible for transport, told BBC Radio York: "Engineers have been testing that the proposals are feasible, that the scheme that's been designed is going to be safe, before we can move forward and implement it."

    But Kate Ravilious, from the York Cycle Campaign, has accused the council of "failing to get its act together" over the proposals.

    She said most of the money had been sitting there for over a year and they were concerned the funding could end up being withdrawn because of strict conditions attached to it about when the work needs to be done.

    The plans are being debated at a council meeting today.

  2. Leeds United star opens new cycle route

    Tim Daley

    Journalist, BBC Radio Leeds

    Leeds United and England star Patrick Bamford has officially opened a new cycle route in the city.

    Patrick Bamford with pupils from Saint Luke's C of E Primary School.

    The player, who is a big supporter of tackling climate change, cut the ribbon on the Elland Road cycle route, with help from pupils from Saint Luke's CofE Primary School in Beeston.

    The route connects the park and ride site beside Leeds United's ground, to the city centre. The stretch, which is just under a mile in length, is part of Leeds's move towards becoming more pedestrian and cycle friendly.

    Bamford told BBC Radio Leeds: "I think over the last three or four years I've started being more involved and more aware of the environment and climate change.

    "I think these little changes are what end up making a big difference and you have to start somewhere."

    He added: "While getting people to cycle instead of driving their cars isn't all of a sudden going to save the world, it's one step at a time, and I think it's a really big thing."

  3. Cyclists hold 100th anniversary service

    Hundreds of bike riders from across the country rode to Meriden on Sunday for a service to remember cyclists who've died in combat.

    Cyclist memorial
    Cyclist memorial

    The ceremony, which was first held 100 years ago, usually takes place in May but has been delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    Meriden, near Coventry, is home to the UK's only known dedicated memorial to cyclists who've died serving their country.