Brighton and Hove City Council

Election results for 2019

    Elected in 2019
    Total
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    20
    20
    -3
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    19
    19
    +8
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    14
    14
    -6
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    1
    1
    +1

Most Recent

School holiday lunch club success

Sarah Booker-Lewis

Local Democracy Reporter

Chomp volunteers Mitchie Alexander and Marissa Mennella with project lead Vanessa O'Shea
BBC
Chomp volunteers Mitchie Alexander and Marissa Mennella with project lead Vanessa O'Shea

A school holiday lunch club has seen more children through its doors than expected this summer.

Chomp provides a meal for children, most of whom have free school meals, and their parents during their school holidays at eight locations across Brighton and Hove.

It is funded by Brighton and Hove City Council, the National Lottery, Children In Need and donations.

This year the project is serving 300 meals a week.

At its session on Tuesday 13 August 35 parents and children enjoyed a hot lunch of meaty or vegetarian shepherd’s pie and broccoli at the One Church in Gloucester Place, Brighton.

Chomp project lead Vanessa O’Shea said: “I was very surprised by the number of working parents, mothers with jobs, that are coming along for lunch... Summer holidays are expensive times.”

As well as lunch, Chomp has an hour of craft activities and cooking classes running every day at various venues across the city.

Mrs O’Shea said: “A big part of Chomp is nutrition. We really want to be able to use good-quality meat and veg from local suppliers.

“We use lots of veg from Rock Farm, which is linked to One Church. We’ve had day trips up there before where families pick the food and cook lunch."

Developer withdraws from 1.8 hectare King Alfred site

Lizzie Massey

BBC Live reporter

The King Alfred leisure centre
Google
The King Alfred leisure centre

Developer Crest Nicholson has withdrawn from the King Alfred development in Hove.

The council has been working with Crest Nicholson Regeneration since 2016, when it won the bid to redevelop the 1.8 hectare site.

Plans involved replacing the ageing King Alfred Leisure Centre with modern sports facilities, and building new housing, including affordable homes.

Chris Tinker, Interim CEO of Crest Nicholson, said: “It is with disappointment that Crest Nicholson has taken the difficult decision to withdraw from the King Alfred development in Hove.

“The ambition of the scheme in these uncertain times is too great... it has become a more complicated project than originally envisaged in terms of both planning and delivery."

A total of £23m of public money - £15m from the Housing Infrastructure Fund (HIF) and £8m from Brighton and Hove City Council - was approved to assist the developer in building a new sports centre and 565 homes.

Council leader Nancy Platts said: “We appreciate the difficulties and complexities of the project, and appreciate too the efforts made by Crest Nicholson, but the council makes no apologies for pressing the developer to deliver the scheme it selected in 2016.

“Finding a viable alternative will be our utmost priority and this will include consulting with the local community who have been so patiently awaiting this development."

Brighton match-day parking scheme under review

Sarah Booker-Lewis

Local Democracy Reporter

People living near Brighton's Amex stadium are being consulted about possible changes to the match-day residents' parking-permit scheme.

Those living in the Coldean and Moulsecoomb districts are entitled to free permits on days when Brighton and Hove Albion are playing at the stadium and parking restrictions are in force.

Visitor permits are also available for residents to buy.

But councillors say people living in those areas are also affected on non-match days by overflow parking from people attending the University of Brighton.

Tracey Hill, who represents Hollingdean and Stanmer, said: “The main things that come up are not to do with match days themselves but university-related issues.

"In Coldean, students living at Varley Park are not supposed to bring cars to the city, but many seem to do so and park in residential streets, although these cars do disappear on match days - which is quite mysterious.

“If there were a way of enforcing the no-car rule, things could be a lot better. I have been asking if the council and the University of Brighton could work together on this."

She said people in other wards had raised other issues, all of which could be considered in the review.

The Brighton and Hove City Council consultation closes on 13 September, and the council's environment, transport and sustainability committee will consider the findings in November.

Pink Floyd guitarist to remain cool

New Medina House
Brighton and Hove City Council

Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour can start to feel comfortable during heatwaves as his bid for air conditioning units has been approved.

The rock star and his novelist wife Polly Sansom are building a three-storey home on the site of Medina House in King’s Esplanade on Hove seafront.

The home is currently under construction after receiving planning permission in 2017 but the couple sought to amend their plans.

The changes approved by Brighton and Hove City Council Planning Committee include different windows, minor changes to the walls, metal cladding and alterations to the roof by adding air conditioning units, removing solar panels and adding a satellite dish.

Seven councillors voted for the application with Green councillor Martin Osborne voting against it.

Guidance to help councillors avoid 'fake news'

Sarah Booker-Lewis

Local Democracy Reporter

Up-to-date social media advice for councillors in Brighton and Hove warns them to be alert to fake news and “bots”.

Social media protocols were last agreed in 2017, a long time in the ever-changing online world.

The new protocol takes out outdated terms and also includes guidelines for WhatsApp.

Phone in hand
Creative Commons

A draft of the new guidance goes before the Audit and Standards Committee at Portslade Town Hall on 23 July.

It states the guidance will help councillors “avoid legal and reputational risks inherent in the use of social media”.

Poems not prayers before council meetings

Sarah Booker-Lewis

Local Democracy Reporter

Alex Phillips
Brighton and Hove City Council

The mayor of Brighton and Hove is to drop the tradition of prayers being said before council meetings, replacing them with poems read by children.

Alex Phillips, 34, the youngest ever mayor of Brighton and Hove, said: “As a young mayor, I see the importance in opening the world of local politics up for our school children to experience.

“It’s vital that there is some sort of moment’s attunement ahead of full council meetings because they are quite long and they can become very heated.

“However, I felt that giving young people the opportunity to showcase their talents in the council chamber, while simultaneously focusing councillors’ minds on the decisions and interactions they are about to make, was the best way to go about it."

Full council meetings are held every six to eight weeks after a cycle of committee meetings.

In January 2012 the High Court ruled that councils lacked legal power to hold prayers as part of a meeting.

But it was legal before the start of a meeting provided councillors were not summoned to attend.