Hartlepool Borough Council

Labour has lost control of the council but no other party has a majority of seats. NOC stands for 'No Overall Control'. Find out more about these results.

Election results for 2019

    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    6
    16
    +4
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    3
    13
    -5
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    1
    3
    No results
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    1
    1
    +1

Most Recent

Before and after door prompts planning row

Local Democracy Reporting Service

Nic Marko

It all started with a car smashing into a door.

Evolution Training on Scarborough Street in Hartlepool had a uPVC replacement installed and applied for retrospective permission.

Hartlepool Borough Council issued an enforcement notice to restore the traditional features of its previous door but the company appealed.

Now the council is going to contest the appeal and take it to the government's Planning Inspectorate.

The planning committee has previously said the new door was "out of character" with the Church Street Conservation Area though the company disputes that and says it looks nicer and is more secure.

Evolution Training's door, before and after
Google/BBC

'Last night’s losses are likely to continue'

Richard Moss

Political Editor, BBC Look North

Labour had a lot to lose in the North East & Cumbria. It is the party that dominates its town halls - but it took some heavy hits overnight.

Sunderland’s voters delivered the early blows - 12 councillors gone.

Then Hartlepool was lost; losses in Allerdale hit double figures and, to add insult to injury, there was a by-election defeat in a usually reliable part of County Durham.

And the party’s problems in northern Mayoral races continue as their candidates trailed in a distant second to Independents in Middlesbrough and Copeland.

Local leaders were quick to point to Brexit confusion. But that just highlights the party’s dilemma. While their leader in Sunderland claims flirting with a new referendum cost him councillors, Newcastle’s Labour leader says a failure to fully back one backfired.

And it just seems voters wanted anyone but Labour in some places. How else to explain gains for UKIP, Greens, Lib Dems, Independents and Conservatives?

As the establishment in the region, perhaps some sort of kicking for Labour was inevitable. But do not discount local factors.

It may be convenient - and partly justified - for council leaders to blame events in Westminster, but anyone who has talked to voters in the region will know that some Labour regimes here are far from loved.

And last night’s losses are likely to continue in other parts of the patch as more results come in.

Labour loses control of Hartlepool

Local Democracy Reporting Service

Nic Marco

Labour has lost control of Hartlepool Council, and while it remains the largest party the council now has no over all control.

The party lost five seats, which went to Independents, the Independent Union, the For Britain Movement, UKIP, Local Conservatives and the Veterans’ and People’s Party.

Council leader Christopher Akers-Belcher, said he was "devastated" at the result and said it showed the "impact of a fractured party".

Hartlepool election count
BBC

BreakingLabour lose control of Hartlepool

Labour lose Hartlepool Council to no overall control.

Plans to build a retail unit in a supermarket car park rejected

Local Democracy Reporting Service

Nic Marko

Plans to create a retail unit in a supermarket car park on Clarence Road in Hartlepool have been rejected.

Last year the proposals from Morrisons to create a Timpson's store in its car park were rejected by the council because they said it "would have a detrimental impact on the general character of the area".

Morrisons in Hartlepool
BBC

An appeal was lodged against the council decision to refuse the plans by Morrisons, but the national Planning Inspectorate moved to dismiss the appeal.

John Dowsett from the Planning Inspectorate ruled the planning committee was right to refuse the proposals, adding: "The appellant recognises that the proposed building would be visible from all directions when entering the car park and approaching the store’s entrance.

“As a consequence, the proposed development, despite its modest scale, would be harmful to the character and appearance of the area."