Architecture

Hearing Architecture

The story of blind architect Chris Downey, told in his own words.
What does it mean to design buildings without sight and could blindness actually make someone a better architect?

Most people are used to experiencing architecture visually, but what happens when we start thinking about other properties of buildings, streets and cities? How do our buildings feel, how do they sound and why does it matter?

Blind architect Chris Downey tells the extraordinary story of his rehabilitation from his total mid career sight loss to an acclaimed practice as a multisensory designer of interiors and urban space.

Visiting buildings including San Francisco’s LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, which he both received support from and co-designed after his sight loss, Chris explores his personal design philosophy. In this radically inclusive approach to architecture, sound and touch, air flow and temperature all play their part. 

He explains why buildings which empathise with their inhabitants, considerate acoustics and design which reaches out a hand to its users should be the future. He also explores how the principles of Universal Design and the concept of delight can help create buildings and public spaces which can make us all healthier, happier and saner - whether we’ve found our disability or not.

Recorded on location in the Bay Area, California, we also hear from University of California, Berkley Professor of Architecture Professor Luisa Caldas, Los Angeles based sound artist and sculptor Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon and Shane Myrbeck, sound artist and acoustician at engineering firm Arup’s San Francisco Sound Lab.

Produced by Michael Umney
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4

Architects have designs on secondary pupils

People silhoutted on steps
Getty Images

A virtual work experience portal for secondary pupils who are missing out due to pandemic restrictions has been launched by a Scots architectural and planning practice.

Halliday Fraser Munro’s team created the resource as it could not host work experience in its Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow offices.

The portal will also feature a competition open to children of all ages to design a building or house, and an architect will create the winning design from each age group as a 3D model on screen.

The portal can be accessed at workexperience.hfm.co.uk.