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The Queen leads remembrance events in London

The Queen lays a wreath at Wellington Barracks Image copyright PA
Image caption The Queen lays a wreath at Wellington Barracks

The Queen and other members of the Royal Family have taken part in remembrance events in London.

The monarch was joined by the Duke of Edinburgh, King Philippe of Belgium and the Duke of Cambridge at the opening of a memorial garden in central London.

The Queen laid a wreath of poppies at the memorial at Wellington Barracks.

The garden was made with soil collected by children from 70 battlefields and war cemeteries in Flanders, where millions died in World War One.

On Armistice Day last year, Prince Philip was present for the soil gathering ceremony in Ypres in his role as senior colonel of the Household Division and colonel of the Grenadier Guards.

Image copyright Sky
Image caption Members of HM Household Division attended the opening of the Flanders Field Memorial Garden

Curator Andrew Wallis said: "This project is about honouring the fallen of the Great War.

"The design of the garden is full of meaningful features. It is a wonderful fusion of Belgo-Anglo craftsmanship."

Belgian architect Piet Blanckaert designed the garden, inspired by the design of First World War memorials.

It includes a circular grass bed which holds the "sacred" soil collected from Flanders, which is inscribed with the words of John McCrae's famous wartime poem In Flanders' Fields.

The garden also has a bench made from Flemish bluestone and trees indigenous to the battlefields

Image copyright Poppy Appeal
Image caption Prince Philip, the Queen, King Philippe of Belgium and the Duke of Cambridge at the opening of the Flanders Field Memorial Garden

Earlier, Prince Harry took part in another remembrance event, visiting the field of remembrance at Westminster Abbey.

He met the president of the Royal British Legion Poppy Factory and workers from the factory, as well as the dean of Westminster and clergy from St Margaret's Church.

The prince laid a cross of remembrance in front of two wooden crosses from the graves of unknown British soldiers from the World War One and World War Two.

The Last Post was played and attendees observed two minutes' silence.

On his visit, the prince spoke to Lisa McKinlay whose husband, L/Cpl Jonathan McKinlay, was killed in Afghanistan in September 2011.

Mrs McKinlay said: "It's nice to speak to someone who knows what the processes are.

"When you are talking to him, you know that he knows."

Image copyright Sky
Image caption Prince Harry lays a cross at the field of remembrance, Westminster Abbey
Image copyright Sky
Image caption The Last Post was played before two minutes' silence

It was his second visit to the field of remembrance at Westminster Abbey - he accompanied Prince Philip to the site last year.

The field of remembrance was opened in the grounds of the abbey in November 1928, when two tribute crosses were planted.

Since then, the tradition has grown and the field is home to thousands of remembrance tributes every year, each cross carrying a personal message to someone who lost his or her life.

D-Day veteran Don Sheppard, 94, who served in the Royal Engineers, said remembrance events are "very important".

He said they are crucial so that "the younger generations can see what we have done".

Prince William and Prince Harry are due to meet medical staff responsible for the care and recovery of British service personnel and veterans at Buckingham Palace later.

The field of remembrance at Westminster Abbey will be open to the public until Sunday November 16, one week after Remembrance Sunday.

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