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Shoreham air crash: In pictures

A number of eyewitnesses and photographers captured the aftermath of the jet crash at Shoreham Airshow.

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On Monday a crane was brought in to remove the plane, which crashed on to the A27 on Saturday during a stunt display.

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The crane took away parts of the Hawker Hunter jet. Police have said the death toll is likely to rise after all the wreckage is removed.

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The vintage jet fell after failing to complete a loop-the-loop manoeuvre.

Image copyright Eddie Mitchell

The crash created a huge fireball. Ailish Southall, who was driving along the road with her children, said: "There were huge amounts of fire and we ran from the car to avoid the debris."

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Eyewitness Gairo Gomez, who was in a building nearby, told the BBC: "I saw the plane going down. I heard a huge bang and the glass was shaking and the doors were banging, the whole building was shaking."

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The A27 was shut in both directions as emergency services attended. Police have said the road will have to be repaired before it can be re-opened.

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The Civil Aviation Authority has announced significant restrictions on vintage jets in air shows, including a ban on aerobatics over land. Some have criticised how close the show was to the road.

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Floral tributes have been left near the scene of the crash, and families have named some of the victims.

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On top of the 11 people thought to have died, a further 14 people were injured in the crash.

The vintage plane was being flown by pilot Andy Hill.

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Mr Hill, pictured above before a flight at Silverstone race course in Northamptonshire in 2009, is in a critical condition in hospital.

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Ground staff from Brighton and Hove Albion FC arrived with tributes to one of the victims, Matt Grimstone, who worked at the club.

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West Sussex coroner Penny Schofield warned that work to identify the victims would be a "slow and painstaking operation".

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