Birmingham & Black Country

MiniBrum: The children’s city designed by school pupils

The mini city Image copyright Birmingham Museums Trust
Image caption The mini city includes a shop, clinic, static canal boat and workshop space

A shrunken-down version of a real-life city for children is opening its doors to the public.

MiniBrum is based at Birmingham's Thinktank Science Museum and is the culmination of a £2.1m, four-year project.

More than 800 children helped create the attraction, which opened on Saturday.

The city's canals, department store Selfridges and the Old Joe Clock Tower are all featured in the design.

It also includes a race track inspired by Birmingham's upcoming Commonwealth Games, a construction zone with a climbing tower and a slide, as well as a Post Office and a salon.

Thinktank manager Lauren Deere said: "Children are at the forefront of the design process.

"Their involvement helped us see everything from a child's perspective, which makes MiniBrum a truly unique space."

Pupils from Benson Community School in Hockley were involved in bringing it all to life, along with children from Henley Montessori School in Henley-in-Arden, who curated their own "mini museum" in the space.

Nine-year-old Daisy Wasley said being involved had been "really fun".

Asked how young visitors would react, she said: "I think they will think it's really excellent. You can work on a building site, or as a vet - it's like being a real working person."

Image copyright Birmingham Museums Trust
Image caption Pupils from Henley Montessori School in Henley-in-Arden were involved in bringing the city to life

Helen Everley, head of the Montessori school said seven of her pupils aged between six and nine had been involved in the design of the little city's museum.

"They had to choose what they wanted to feature and then come up with ideas of how they would exhibit them.

"They had ownership from the word 'go'.

"The respect the pupils had from the museum was second to none," she added.

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