Bristol

Funds bid to stop war memorial in Stoke Gifford from sinking

Stoke Gifford war memorial
Image caption The cenotaph was erected on the green at Stoke Gifford around 90 years ago but in the last three years it has started sinking into the ground

Residents of a village near Bristol say their war memorial to the fallen of the two World Wars is sinking.

The cenotaph was erected on the green at Stoke Gifford around 90 years ago but in the last three years the "big lump of rock" has begun to subside.

The Parish Council has put up £2,000 but a further £3,500 is needed to stop the memorial "going down".

Brian Hewittt, from the Royal British Legion, said: "It's taller than me at the moment but it's catching me up."

The local stone pillar, set on a square plinth, was erected in 1927 to commemorate the 18 "men who fell" in World War One and World War Two.

But according to Mr Hewitt, the "tremendous amount of rain" over the past three winters has "washed the soil away from the foundations".

"The cenotaph is quite heavy - it's a big lump of rock - and because it's so heavy it's gradually going down," he said.

"We don't want to lose it because we're all very proud of it - so it will have to be lifted out so that they can rebuild the foundations."

Image caption The "big lump of rock" will need to be lifted out and the foundations rebuilt in order to stop it sinking into the ground

Built largely from public funds, the monument is now the responsibility of Stoke Gifford Parish Council.

Its clerk, David Shield, said they had "ringfenced a small amount of money towards the necessary repairs".

"We've also been in contact with the War Memorials Trust and we've very hopeful that there may well be some grant funding that can be allocated to the project," he said.

"But it would be wonderful if there were donations from either the public or local organisations."

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