Bristol

'Outstanding' student Stiven Bregu saved from deportation

Stiven Bregu Image copyright Stiven Bregu
Image caption Stiven Bregu was trafficked to the UK in 2015 aged 13 and dumped alone in Keynsham near Bristol

An "outstanding" student has won an appeal to stay in the UK after a petition to prevent his deportation got more than 90,000 signatures.

Stiven Bregu came to the UK alone from Albania when he was 13 to escape a violent home life.

Unable to speak English, he was placed into foster care in Bristol and has since achieved "extraordinary" GCSE results at school.

After his application for asylum was denied he made an immigration appeal.

Stiven's head of year at St Mary Redcliffe and Temple School, Rob Shaw, told the Bristol Post: "Stiven has now heard the result of his appeal and I am delighted to tell you that he has been successful and has the right to remain in the UK.

"The Home Office now has two weeks to appeal the decision, but assuming that they don't, Stiven will be able to start his apprenticeship."

The teenager recently competed his A-Levels in Biology, Chemistry and Maths and has secured an apprenticeship offer from a wealth management firm due to his "talent for mathematics".

'Huge asset'

Head teacher Elisabeth Gilpin described him as an "outstanding student and a huge asset to our school community".

He came to the attention of Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees when he was accepted on to his programme investing in gifted students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Mr Rees described the appeal hearing decision as "brilliant news".

"Stiven is a determined, kind and clever young man, and Bristol is lucky to have him," he said.

"I just hope that this case leads to broader reform of our asylum system, so that nobody else has to experience the trauma of what Stiven has been through."

The Home Office said: "We have received the judgment and are considering it carefully before proceeding."

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