Bristol

Residents 'misled' over The Wave surfing lake plan

Artists impression Image copyright The Wave
Image caption Planning permission for the venue was granted in 2014

People living near a surfing lake due to open in the autumn say they have been "misled" about the type of events it will host.

The Wave in Easter Compton near Bristol will boast an education centre, café bar, camping facilities and other short-stay accommodation.

However, residents have complained to the local authority about the intention to serve alcohol at the venue.

A The Wave spokesman said it had been "absolutely honest" about its plans.

An application to serve alcohol will be considered by South Gloucestershire Council on 20 August.

The Local Democracy Reporting Service (LDRS) said 41 objectors have had their names redacted by the council.

'Bitterly disappointed'

One said: "The proposal is completely alien to the original project. The prospect of noisy parties and outdoor music at the multiple leisure venues that currently exist will permeate the area and completely ruin the quiet greenbelt environment. We were misled."

Another said the licensing application was a "fundamental change" from what was originally proposed and they felt "bitterly disappointed and cheated".

The Wave chief executive Craig Stoddart said: "It has always been our intention to serve alcohol in our café, as happens in other sporting facilities such as the local golf club.

"However, this is very much secondary to the main experience on the site, which is surfing.

"We are aiming for a café culture on site, where people can enjoy a drink responsibly after their surf, not an alcohol-led culture focused on irresponsible drinking."

The £25m development straddles land at Washingpool Farm, Almondsbury, and Over Court Farm in Easter Compton.

Technology developed in Spain will be used to generate surfing waves of up to 1.5m (5ft) high for surfers of varying skill levels.

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