Cornwall

Locomotive restored in Cornwall to transport passengers

Dorothea
Image caption The Hunslet locomotive, called Dorothea, was considered to be beyond repair

A locomotive which has undergone 12 years of restoration work will transport passengers for the first time in Cornwall.

The Hunslet locomotive, called Dorothea, was considered to be beyond repair after many parts were removed during the 1960s by enthusiasts.

Kay Bowman, from the Launceston Steam Railway company, has restored the engine to its former glory.

Until the start of the 1940s it was used in a Welsh slate quarry.

Nigel Bowman, the managing director of Launceston Steam Railway, said: "Kay set about restoring Dorothea to working order from an incomplete set of parts.

"It was a task considered impossible by many experts."

Dorothea, which was built by the Hunslet Engine Company of Leeds in 1901, will be making its debut pulling passenger carriages during the October half term week until 2 November.

The narrow gauge locomotive will be travelling along the Launceston line, which goes through the Kensey Valley, to the hamlet of Newmills.

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