RHS Chatsworth Flower Show: First look at 'inspiring' gardens

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image copyrightRHS
image captionThe showground for the RHS Chatsworth show covers 43 acres

The first new Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) show in a decade is set to open to the public.

The show at Chatsworth, a Derbyshire stately home, features eight display gardens.

Organisers are expecting almost 90,000 people to visit the event, officially opened by Alan Titchmarsh and Mary Berry, over five days.

Anna Skibniewski-Ball, assistant manager, said she hoped it would be "truly wonderful and inspiring".

The show, which opens to the public on Wednesday, runs until Sunday at the Duke of Devonshire's Chatsworth estate.

Some of the judging has been postponed until later in the week because of rain and high winds.

image copyrightRHS
image captionAlan Titchmarsh and Mary Berry opened the show

Alan Titchmarsh, a vice president of the RHS, said he was pleased Chatsworth had got its own show.

He said: "It's immensely exciting, we come to the county fair every year and love the Derbyshire Dales, the folk of Derbyshire are friendly, it's great for it to get its own RHS show."

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image captionChef Raymond Blanc was among the first people to get a look at Chatsworth's displays
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image captionA number of the gardens sit in the shadow of Chatsworth House

The RHS, which famously runs the Chelsea Flower Show, said the theme for Chatsworth was "design revolutionaries."

image copyrightRHS
image captionA number of hand-painted cows form part of the Experience Peak District and Derbyshire Garden

The showground at Chatsworth, which covers 43 acres, will feature more than 350 exhibitors from across the UK.

Three temporary bridges, the longest of which is over 40m in length, have been installed to allow people to explore gardens on both sides of the River Derwent.

image copyrightRHS
image captionEarlier, dancers from the London Contemporary Ballet Theatre braved the wet weather to perform in one of the gardens

The show's largest garden, a modernist quarry plot, features more than 7,000 bedding plants, a 10-metre tall oak tree and more than 20 slate monoliths.

image copyrightRHS
image captionJackie Knight has aimed to create a "natural and calming space in which to relax" in her Just Add Water garden
image copyrightRHS
image captionThe show celebrates all aspects of Derbyshire life
image copyrightRHS
image captionQuarry Garden, designed by Paul Hervey-Brookes, is the largest on the site
image copyrightRHS
image captionPlants and flowers on show come in all different shapes and sizes
image copyrightRHS
image captionNeil Sutcliffe's creation will take visitors on "a personal and shared family experience of the journey of terminal illness and death"
image copyrightRHS
image captionA gorilla statue is one of the more unusual exhibits
image copyrightRHS
image captionAnyone for tennis?

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