Essex

Canvey teenager jailed for crashing BMW into five men

Max Maxwell Image copyright Essex Police
Image caption Max Maxwell had passed his driving test three days before the crash

A teenager has been jailed for three years and three months after he "ploughed into" five men while driving his father's BMW.

Max Maxwell, 18, was sentenced at Basildon Crown Court over the collision on Furtherwick Road, Canvey Island on 14 April.

He initially fled the crash scene, but handed himself in the following day.

His lawyer said Maxwell, of Smallgains Avenue, Canvey, was "extremely sorry" and wanted to meet the injured men.

He had passed his test three days before when he decided to take his father's car so he could place a bet, the court heard.

'War zone'

However, after seeing a police car in the rear-view window he panicked and attempted to overtake a van on a corner - crashing into the young men at about 16:15 BST.

The victims, all in their 20s, had been walking to a pub to watch the Grand National and were left bleeding and with open fractures in a scene described in court as looking like a "war zone".

Image copyright Chris Kidman
Image caption The BMW was abandoned at the scene of the crash, police said

Maxwell's mother Sarah Maxwell said her son was "devastated" by his actions that day.

She said: "If he could take the whole day back he would and wouldn't have gone out, I don't think he would be getting in a car.

"He is just really sorry, he never meant to have that happen, he is just in shock."

Image copyright Nigel Futter
Image caption Those injured were taken to hospitals in London and Essex

Maxwell, who will serve his sentence in a young offenders institution, has also been banned from driving for nearly six years.

Sgt Steve Holmes said it was a miracle none of the victims had died.

"Max Maxwell took his father's car without permission then drove it in such a manner that he endangered the lives of the public," he said.

"He ploughed into the five men, causing some horrific life-changing injuries and ongoing emotional and psychological trauma."

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