Norfolk

Deaf Havana return to King's Lynn for sell-out hometown gig

Chris Pennells, Tom Ogden, Matthew Veck-Gilodi, James Veck-Gilodi, Lee Wilson and Max Britton of Deaf Havana perform on the last night of their April 2013 acoustic tour on stage at the Albert Hall on 7 April, 2013 in Nottingham, England Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Deaf Havana performing on the last night of their April 2013 acoustic tour at the Albert Hall in Nottingham

A rock band who have had had three UK top 10 albums have admitted they are nervous about returning to their home town for a sell-out gig.

Deaf Havana formed at the College of West Anglia in King's Lynn, Norfolk, in 2005.

Drummer Tom Ogden said the group were excited to be playing the town for the first time in almost 10 years.

Ogden was "gobsmacked" their gig at the 900-capacity King's Lynn Corn Exchange on Thursday evening had sold out.

The band have sold more than 200,000 albums, and in over a decade of touring have played at Glastonbury, Download, Reading and Leeds festivals, but their last show in King's Lynn was at Bar Red in 2010.

Image caption The band have also written songs inspired by Norfolk, such as Hunstanton Pier

"I knew a few of our friends would be coming, and my wife and mum and dad, but didn't know it would sell out," he said.

"I am a little bit nervous about it, to be honest."

He said growing up in King's Lynn helped the band to develop as "in this area there was not a lot to do apart from spending time with friends and playing music".

The band have also written songs inspired by the region, such as Hunstanton Pier.

They have had three top 10 albums in the UK: Old Souls (2013) which reached number nine, All These Countless Nights (2017) which hit number five and last year's Rituals which reached number eight.

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Drummer Tom Ogden said the group were excited to be playing the town for the first time in almost 10 years

The band moved to London in their formative years.

"London is the big place for record labels and getting people to come to your shows," he said.

Ogden, who now lives in a village near Long Sutton, 14 miles (22km) from King's Lynn, said the band were pleased to help local bands The Extons and the Eluders by offering them support slots at the Corn Exchange.

"It's nice to give other bands from our town the opportunity to perform," he said.

Image copyright Deaf Havana
Image caption Ogden, who lives near King's Lynn, said the band were pleased to help local acts by offering them support slots at the King's Lynn gig

His advice to people starting bands now is to "keep playing until you get really tight as a unit".

He said keeping a band together could be "hard as you live in each other's pockets".

"We are lucky we've been very good friends. That is the key for us. That is what has kept us going."

Image caption Ogden said growing up in King's Lynn helped the band to develop as "in this area there was not a lot to do apart from spending time with friends and playing music"

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