Nottingham

Raccoon dogs recaptured after four-day search

Raccoon dog Image copyright Mandy Marsh
Image caption One raccoon dog was photographed during a confrontation with farm animals

Two escaped raccoon dogs that were said to be "terrorising" residents have been caught and returned to their owner.

Nottinghamshire Police had described the animals as "potentially dangerous" and one woman said her goat and pony were attacked.

Mandy Marsh - who owns the pony and goat - said one of the raccoon dogs also confronted a dog walker.

However, the raccoon dogs' owner said they never posed a serious threat.

The male and female went missing from Big Lane, Clarborough, on Tuesday morning after digging their way out of their enclosure.

Police said they were found and recaptured in the local area late on Friday.


Are raccoon dogs dangerous?

Image copyright PA

Headlines about the escaped raccoon dogs suggested they were terrorising people and that the village was under siege from the "absolutely mad" animals.

However, their owner maintained they were terrified, which may have caused them to "do silly things when they are in that state".

They are part of the Canidae family, which includes dogs and foxes.

The RSPCA says they are wild animals, rather than pets, and should not be kept in houses.

"In these cases they often become aggressive and unmanageable," said Stephanie Jayson, senior exotics and wildlife trade officer from the RSPCA.

"And while they are too small to be dangerous, they can bite and scratch."

Raccoon dogs do not eat large animals such as goats, but they do eat small animals, insects, fish, birds, fruits, nuts and berries.

Raccoon dogs: What are they, where are they from?

The owner of the raccoon dogs did not want to comment after they were recaptured.

He previously told the BBC: "They have escaped and that is my mistake, but it's important people don't think these animals are especially dangerous.

"I have been up through the night, I've been really grateful for the help given and offered, and it's been hard work."

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