Teenager jailed for Oxford screwdriver stabbing death

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Image caption,

Robin Williamson was attacked outside a row of shops in Wood Farm

A 17-year-old boy has been jailed for causing the death of a man he stabbed repeatedly with a screwdriver.

Robin Williamson, 43, from Oxford, was attacked in October 2019 following an argument outside a row of shops.

He died of his injuries four weeks later after failing to seek proper medical attention, prosecutors said.

The court heard treatment "would have prevented" the wound on his left thigh becoming infected.

His attacker, who cannot be named due to his age, pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was jailed for four years and four months.

Oxford Crown Court heard the teenager stabbed the older man repeatedly in Magdalen Wood, Wood Farm, on 27 October.

Mr Williamson died on 12 November after an abscess developed in one of his stab wounds.

'Devastating'

The judge was told Mr Williamson's "non-compliance" with a doctor's advice "had a material impact on the injury".

He also discharged himself from hospital on 4 November and missed an appointment, despite being in "considerable pain", on 11 November.

The court heard it was "very unlikely" Mr Williamson's injury would have resulted in death had it been treated.

Judge Ian Pringle QC said the teenager stabbed Mr Williamson "at least four if not more" times.

"The effect of your actions was devastating," he told the defendant.

Richard Christie QC, defending, said his client was "deeply sorry", showed remorse for his actions, and wanted to engage in restorative justice.

The teenager, from Milton Keynes, previously pleaded guilty to manslaughter in February.

He was due to go on trial for murder, but his plea was accepted by the Crown Prosecution Service with the support of Mr Williamson's family.

A 16-year-old boy from Banbury, Oxfordshire, who was also due to stand trial, had all charges against him dropped.

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