Sheffield & South Yorkshire

Young people photograph their lives in Sheffield

Young boy with bag of crisps, old man in background Image copyright Sheffield Futures
Image caption The photos depict daily lives of young people in Sheffield's Roma Slovak, Pakistani and Somali communities

Photos taken by children to depict their daily lives have gone on show.

Children at youth clubs in Sheffield's Roma Slovak, Pakistani and Somali communities were given disposable cameras to photograph their pastimes.

While some took selfies, others took pictures at home, in the street or at their youth clubs.

Youth charity Sheffield Futures organised the experiment for the city's Migration Matters festival.

Image copyright Fozia Sultana
Image caption Spices and henna designs form part of daily life and special occasions in many Muslim homes

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Organiser Tash Bright said 40 children aged 10 to 17 in Page Hall, Pitsmoor and Tinsley took part in the project, which aimed to represent "the many diverse communities that make Sheffield great."

"They'd never used film before, they're so used to the lighting always being right on their smartphones," Ms Bright said.

"They use apps to create a vintage look but perhaps didn't know that light flares occur regularly in film photography."

She said there was also "confusion" about the lack of a screen, and why images did not appear instantly like a Polaroid.

Image copyright Sheffield Futures
Image caption Many of the young people people found did not realise light flares occur regularly in film photography

Fozia Sultana, 17, from Darnall, photographed spices and henna designs at home.

"My mum always taught us the base of Pakistani cooking is spices," she said.

"Whenever my family go back home, my maternal grandmother sends home-grown spices which my mum stores in special containers and only uses for special occasions."

Image copyright Sheffield Futures
Image caption The photos were taken by children as young as 10 on disposable cameras

Pragnya Alla, 17, from Crosspool, photographed herself in her bedroom mirror wearing an embroidered Indian dress.

"When I put on traditional clothes I feel most in touch with my heritage," she said.

"It reminds me of my grandparents and how happy they become when they see me wearing something which links us."

Image copyright Pragnya Alla
Image caption Pragnya Alla said traditional Indian dress reminds her of links with her grandparents
Image copyright Pragnya Alla
Image caption Pragnya Alla: "This photo represents Sheffield's diversity we're all from different parts of the world and yet we're the same in many ways"

Migration Matters runs from 14-22 June to coincide with National Refugee Week.

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