Stoke & Staffordshire

Stoke-on-Trent man let dog suffer with 'worst skin condition'

Daisy Image copyright RSPCA
Image caption An RSPCA inspector said Daisy was suffering with a chronic skin condition and had lost most of her fur

A man has been banned from keeping animals for a decade after a dog was left with the "worst skin condition" an RSPCA inspector had ever seen.

The charity said when it found the Staffordshire bull terrier type at the home of Daniel Tomlinson, she had lost most of her fur.

Tomlinson, 49, of Oxford Street, Stoke-on-Trent, admitted causing unnecessary suffering to an animal.

The RSPCA said the dog - Daisy - was recovering.

Tomlinson, it said, had failed over months to get veterinary treatment for the animal's chronic skin complaint.

According to the charity, its officers investigated in March having been called by police who had attended Tomlinson's address on an unrelated matter.

At sentencing at North Staffordshire Justice Centre on 15 July, he was also given a 14-week suspended prison sentence and ordered to complete 200 hours of unpaid work.

On Monday, the RSPCA revealed the extent of the condition in which Tomlinson had left the dog.

Inspector Charlotte Melvin said: "It was the worst skin complaint I have seen on a dog during my six years as an RSPCA inspector.

"It was obvious she was in a suffering state and had been for months."

Image copyright RSPCA
Image caption Daisy's fur has grown back since her ordeal

Ms Melvin said Tomlinson claimed to have taken Daisy for veterinary treatment previously but never went back for a follow-up appointment so she was left in this "awful condition".

Daisy is now doing well in RSPCA care and will soon be ready for a new home, according to the charity.

"Her fur has grown back and she looks like a different dog - she looks so happy and healthy," said Ms Melvin.

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